(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Recreation"

HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 



OF THE 



1 



MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY 

Bequest oe 
WILLIAM BREWSTER 



DjbOyyJ^- H-, 1*1*0 . ■ 



m 



& 



■>i 




j=* 




WILLIAM BREWSTER 






DEC 4 1920 



... V 



J U N ^04 



VOLUME XXI. 
NUMBER i 



JULY, 1904 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




PVBLl 



A GOOD PLACE FOR A 4TH OF JULY PICNIC 



Published by G. 0. Shields (Coquina), 23 west 24m street, new york 



Z 



Question of Identification ; 



An Unique Story of a Pet Sandhill Crane, by LOUIS 
T. McKin ; with full page drawing by J. O. NUGENT 






- ' - ' ',• 



***mt«.mn->"1 



iS^ 



uminer 



ROYAL MUSKOKA' HOTEL, 

fcl US KOKA LAKES. CANADA 



— for your vacation 

Come to "beautiful Canada" — among the Muskoka 
Lakes — to the loveliest spot you have ever seen. 

New scenes, new sports arid new associations — a new 
sense of life in the cool, bracing air. 

All the charm of primeval pine forests, rugged rocks attd 
sparkling waters — with the luxury and comfort of the best 
American hotel. 

Muskoka is easy of access from all American points, via 
Niagara Falls, Detroit and Chicago. 

HAY FEVER UNKNOWN 

Handsomely illustrated descriptive matter free. Apply to 



G. T. BELL, 

Gen'l Pass'r & Ticket Agt., 

Grand Trunk Railway System, 

Montreal, Canada. 



ALAN F. CAMPBELL, 

OR Mgr. "Royal Muskoka" Hotel, 

Muskoka Navigation Co., 

Gravenhurst, Ont. 



"The land of lakes and islands— the Killarney of America. 1 




RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1903, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



fi.oo a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER page. 

Scattered Over the Yard Were Scores of Cranes.- Frontispiece 2 

A Question of Identification Louis T . McKim 3 

The Personnel of the Pack Train. Illustrated G. O. Shields 7 

The Scoters. Illustrated Allan Brooks 13 

A Night in a Pigeon Boost. Illustrated Wm. A. Crawley 17 

Apostrophe to a Trout. Poem J. B. Currie 18 

Camping at Culver's Lake. Illustrated J. H. Uhle 19 

When the Ptarmigan Changes Color. Illustrated A. H. Dunham 23 

A Canadian Trouting Trip B. Kelley 25 

Brer Johnsing's Soliloqy Poem R. Davis 26 

Fishing in Southern Washington - M. F. Jamar, Jr 27 

Among the Selkirks and Canadian Rockies W. C. W. Gieger 29 

Peaks and Passes of Colorado. H. A. Crafts 31 

The Otter's Highway M.S. H. 35 

Hunting for Honey C. Jurgenson 34 

Little Things in Nature Arthur Phelps 35 

Cruelty to Country Neighbors Mrs. H. P. Piper 36 

Nightfall. Poem A.N. Killgore 36 

Seen by the Great Horned Owl Sherman A. Paddock 62 

From the Game Fields 37 

Fish and Fishing 40 

Guns and Ammunition 44 

Natural History 49 

The League of American Sportsmen 52 

Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17, 1 



Pure and Impure Foods 54 

Publisher's Notes 56 

Editor's Corner ; 59 

Amateur Photography 64 









me®! 






\. 



iru i 



One-Third 

of a 

Century 

Standard of the World 

A delicious beautlfler, preserver and cleanser of 
the teeth; makes the breath sweet and the gums 
less tender. The metal box Is a handy pack- 
age for toilet table and traveling; no powder to 
litter, no liquid to spill or stain. 

25 cents, at all druggists. 
C. H. STRONG & CO., Props., Chicago, U.S.A. 



SUNBURN 

quickly relieved and surely cured by 




It acts like magic and is abso- 
lutely harmless. A Trial Bottle 
Free which will absolutely prove 
this statement sent for ioc. to 
pay postage. Don't Wait until 
you have a bad case but get it 
now and have it at hand when 
needed. 

Sold by leading druggists. 

None genuine without my signature. 



% 




UtdOJuJuUuE* 



F— 59 Prince St.. New York. 

Send for free Booklet "How to treat dis- 
eases." containing- hundreds of unsolicited 
testimonials of wonderful cures. 



ii RECREATION. 



Everything the 



Camper Needs 



SEND ioc for our new cata- 
logue "R," 240 pages of infor- 
mation useful to the Camper, ] 
Hunter, Fisherman, Canoeist, 
and all those who live out-of- 
doors, also to those who use 
Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, 
Canoes,Tents> Clothing, Cooking 
Outfits, Sleeping Bags, Stoves, 
Pack-saddles, Pneumatic Beds 
and Cushions, etc., etc. 



T+Yfif* with every purchase 
to the amount of ten 




dollars, we will include a repro- 
duction of this picture, 11x18 
inches, drawn by Thomas Fo- 

garty, for "The Forest/' by Stewart Edward White. Every 
lover of nature should make this book a part of his outfit. 
Price, $1.50. Mention Recreation. 

ABERCROMBIE & FITCH 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

COMPLETE OUTFITS for 

EXPLORERS, CAMPERS AND PROSPECTORS 
314-316 Broadway, New York 



RECREATION. 



in 




IV 



RECREATION. 



An Ideal Sea Trip 



Offered by the 



RED CROSS LINE 




A CHARMING daylight sail through Long 
Island, Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds. 
Fine view of picturesque Nova Scotia and 
of the bold, rugged Newfoundland Coast. 

A two weeks' cruise at one-quarter the cost of 
going to Europe and a greater change of air 
and scene. Steamers sail weekly, making the round 
trip from New York to St. Johns and return in thir- 
teen days and there can be no more delightful ocean 
voyage for those who want rest and sea air. The steamers 
remain in Halifax one day, going and returning, and two 
days in St. Johns, thus giving passengers an opportunity to 
visit these beautiful and interesting cities and surrounding 
country. The cost is low and the accommodation and ser- 
vices the very best. (Stop-over privileges allowed.) For 
sailing dates and full information apply to 

Bowring & Company, statist. New York 

Mention Recreation. 



RECREATION. 



RACINE BOAT MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN ===== 




Our Turbine Motor Hunting Boat, as shown above, is 16 feet long, draws loaded only 
lOinchesof water, is fitted with our 3 H.P. motor and underwater exhaust. No springs, no 
valves, no clicks — as noiseless as a Row Boat. Speed 6 miles per hour. Operation and 
satisfaction guaranteed for $275. Cheaper ones if you want them. 




Our Canvas Cedar Paddling Canoe, as shown above, is 14 feet long, will carry four in 
a pinch and is built for service. A comfortable and easy paddler. Price, F. 0. B., $30— 
no extras. 




Our Still Hunter, as shown, 1 1 % feet long, 
36 inches wide, built of White Cedar, will 
carry 600 lbs., weight only 80 lbs. Ample 
room under deck for decoys. Light weight, 
light draught, very stiff, very still and very 
cheap. Price, complete with paddle $20, 
F.O.B. 



Our 15 foot Fishing Motor Boat is the 
"limit." Has 4 foot beam, draws 12 inches, 
speed 6 miles per hour, seats four to 
five, will carry 1,000 lbs. 1 H. P. motor, 
operation guaranteed. Built of Cedar, nat- 
ural finish, brass trimmed, a good troller, a 
good guide to the fishing grounds and a sure 
returner. We have them in stock at our 
various warehouses — price $165. Money refunded if not satisfied. 

Send 10c. for our 64 page catalog describing the others, and we will tell you the 
address of our nearest showrooms. If you haven't the stamps handy drop a postal. 

Mention Recreation. 

Address: RACINE BOAT MFG. CO., (Riverside) MUSKEGON, MICH. 




VI 



RECREATION. 



m 



BETTY ZANE 

Uhe Heroine of Wheeling 




A 



N historical romance — 
thrillingly interesting 
from beginning to 
end. A true story of the 
struggle for independence and 
the siege of Fort Henry, 
September 11, 1782, told by 
a descendant of the Zanes who 
bore such an important part 
in the events of that period. 



BETTY 



A TRUE STORY 

Illustrated in India. Tint 



$ 



1.50 



-By 

P. ZANE GREY 



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS 

New York Sun — "The incidents of pioneer life 
would excite interest even if they were less well 
handled." 

New York Times — "Entertaining reading." 

Syracuse Herald — "Has handled his subject well." 

Southern Star (Atlanta) — "It has the life, the col- 
oring, the very breath of those pioneer" days." 

Recreation — "Recounts vividly the perils, the hard- 
ships and the privations of the sturdy pioneers." 

Public Opinion — "Written primarily for the benefit 
of the Revolutionary Daughters Societies, will 
interest others equally." 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle — "One welcomes most cor- 
dially the appearance of a Fenimore Cooper fron- 
tier story which is told without melodramatic 
exaggeration, without tiresome prolixity (Cooper's 
fatal fault), and with a just and well poised ad- 
mixture of history and romance." 

Zanesville Daily Courier — "Every school girl knows 
and loves Betty Zane, the heroine of the be- 
leaguered garrison at Wheeling, long, long ago. 
Dr. Grey has portrayed the real Betty Zane; and 
has given us the real thing in pioneer life." 








PUBLISHED BY 








c 


harles Francis 


P 


RESS 


30-' 


*2 WEST 


THIRTEENTH STREET, NEW YORK 


CITY 



SPECIAL * r ° r ^® days we -will mail you prepaid one copy of <C1 ^ C 
. Betty Zane and give you "Recreation for 1 year for 



Betty 



RECREATION. 



VII 



*« A Great Natural History." — New York Sun. 




By W. T. HORNADAY 

Director of the New York Zoological Park ; 
Author of ** Two Years in the Jungle ** 

With 343 illustrations, picturing 375 animals, besides charts and maps 



The Outlook S'ays: 

"Mr. Hornaday is a 
practical man and he has 
written a practical book. 
The descriptions 
are clear and avoid over- 
technicality, while they are 
accompanied by readable 
accounts of animal traits 
and incidents of wild life. 
It is refreshing to have a 
book that is thoroughly de- 
pendable as regards fact 
and scientific spirit, yet 
written with liveliness and 
freshness of manner." 



THE 

AMERICAN 
NATURAL 
HISTORY 



v/.t.hornaday 



Royal 8vo, $3.50 net. 

(Carriage extra.) 



Ernest Ingersoll 
says : 
"The author has suc- 
ceeded remarkably well 
from the popular as well as 
from the professional point 
of view. The result is a 
book which a farm- boy may 
study without a teacher and 
get a proper idea of the 
animals about him ; and a 
book which a teacher may 
truthfully follow in the 
class-room and not mislead 
the pupils he is endeavor- 
ing to instruct." 



"Not only a book packed with information which can be depended on, but one of 
absorbing interest. . . . The best thing in its field that has been published in this 
country." — Nashville American. 

" Here are the beasts of the field, the birds of the air, the fishes of the deep, described 
in clear, simple language, with no ambiguity, and pictured in many cases by photographs 
from life, in others by drawings of well-known animal painters. We suspect that Mr. 
Hornaday's book will be the popular natural history for a long time to come. " — New 
York Sun. 

" It is safe to predict for this lavishly illustrated work wide and enduring popularity ; 
there is so human a note in it, it is so markedly well designed to attract and hold the 
attention of older as well as younger readers." — New York Evening Mail. 

"The manner of treatment throughout is not merely interesting, it is exceedingly 
Witty and uniformly readable. ... It would seem that every effort had been made 
by the author to secure accuracy and modernity of treatment, and his book is altogether 
one to be prized on every account." — The Dial 



CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS 



153-157 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK CITY 



—.m 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 



(U 



'>_; 



§*v 










h**-*** 









BRIEFLY 

HipO find Chautauqua Lake go west 
from New York or east from 
Chicago, about five hundred miles via the 
Erie Railroad — a night's ride. 

Summer excursion tickets are now 
available. Special excursions July8 and 29. 

Illustrated descriptive folder may be 
had upon application to ticket agents 
or by addressing D. W. Cooke, 
General Passenger Agent, Erie Rail- 
road Company, New York. 



RECREATION. 



IX 



O'er Foam-Flecked Floods 




TUNNEL FALLS, MISSISSAGA RIVER 

July is the month of the canoe. The days are long, the nights 
warm, and the balmy air calls young and old out of doors. 

Through the dark northern forest runs the MISSISSAGA, 
its pools full of fish; its shores tracked by the most stately game 
of the continent. 

It is reached most easily from Bisco or Winnebago on the 
main line of the 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

For further information apply to any of the Company's agents 
Robert Kerr, Passenger Traffic Manager, MontreaJ 



RECREATION. 



Summer 






Are you going on a camping tour? 
Do you seek the best place for Trout fishing, 
Bass or Muskallonge? 
Are you looking for a quiet farm house or village 
■where your family can spend the Summer, or for more 
elaborate hotel service at points where fine golf links, 
tennis courts, bathing beaches and yachting fleets provide 
recreation ? 

Do you desire information as to the hundreds of cool and 
charming lake resorts and fishing and hunting grounds of Wis- 
consin, Minnesota and Northern Michigan? 

Are you interested in the trip to the mountain resorts of Colorado, 
Utah, the Black Hills, the Yellowstone, the Yosemite, Alaska, 
or the many delightful places on the Pacific Coast? 
If so, you can obtain hundreds of helpful facts by application to 
the ticket offices of the 

CHICAGO 8 NORTH WESTERN RY. 

We publish numerous maps, extensive hotel lists and interest- 
ing booklets which are at your disposal. Our representa- 
tives will answer your inquiries and give you all possible 

assistance in arranging your Sum- 
mer Outing. 

If you cannot call, write, advising 
lit I what subject you are interested 
in, and printed matter will be 
sent you free of charge. 



All agents sell tickets via this line. 
NW301 W. B. KNISKERN, 

Passenger Traffic Manager, 
CHICAGO. 











MbS 








tst'i 


Wnjfc BM 












L ntM 




m ( ^ 






wA 




pfe^ 




^Bft - 


w^ 






fkM 










PsH 






u2 



mm 



RECREATION. xi 



" In all the land, range up, range down, 
Is there ever a place so pleasant and sweet ? 



THE 
1000 
ISLAND S 



There may be somewhere on the earth a more 
delightful region than that of the Thousand Islands 
but if there is, it has not been discovered. It is 
as fine as the Bay of Naples, with no danger of 
being buried in hot ashes. There are 2,000 pic- 
turesque Islands scattered along the twenty-five 
miles of one of the most beautiful rivers in the 
world. You can find out a great deal regarding 
it in No. 10 of the " Four Track Series," "The 
Thousand Islands/' of the St. Lawrence River 
issued by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL 



A copy will be mailed free, upon receipt of a two-cent stamp, by George H. 
Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New York Central & Hudson River Rail- 
road, Grand Central Station, New York. ' 



Xll 



RECREATION. 




IN THE ADIRONDACKS— The New Hermitage 

At Lake Bonaparte, New York, 

Once the property of King Joseph Bonaparte, and named in his honor. 

The hotel has all the modern improvements and accessories. Broad verandas, wide, 
roomy halls, large open fire-places, reading rooms, billiard rooms, telephone, daily mail. 

Guests have the opportunity of enjoying delightful rowing, canoeing, bathing. The 
finest fishing in the Adirondacks, Croquet, Tennis. 

House open from June 1st to December 1st. 

A park containing 800 acres; beautiful walks and drives. 

Handsomely illustrated book, giving full information, sent on request 

Mention Eecreation. 

DAVID SCANLIN, Proprietor, Bonaparte, New York. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



The Land of 
Evangeline. 




The Ideal Vacation Country with 
All the charms of Foreign Lands. 

A Direct Weekly Service Between 

New York, Ymoifli and Halifax 

By the DOMINION ATLANTIC RY'S 
SUPERB TWIN SCREW 19-KNOT 

S. S. PRINCE ARTHUR 

Sailing from Munson Line S. S. Pier 14, East River, N. Y., 11 a. m., every Saturday 

This offers tourists an opportunity of visiting- the most beautiful of the 
Maritime Provinces and the far-famed "Land of Evangeline" under the best and 
most delightful conditions as the Prince Arthur is one of the stanchest, fastest and 
most luxurious steamships in the Atlantic trade. 

HALIFAX 



EVANGELINE 



_\ YARMOUTH! NEW f* 

Round Trip, $25.00 ) YORK (. Round Trip, $32.00 

Including Meals and Cabin Berth 

* OPTION — PRIVILEGE OF RAIL TRIP EITHER GOING OR RE- 
TURNING, BETWEEN YARMOUTH AND HALIFAX 

Individual State Rooms and Rooms de Luxe, from $2.00 

For literature and tickets apply to Frank Whitcomb, 1404 Broadway; Thos- 
Cook & Son, 1185 and 261 Broadway; Raymond and Whitcomb, 25 Union Square 
West; R. H. Crunden & Co., 149 Broadway; Frank C. Clark, 113 Broadway, and 
all general tourist agencies, or to 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Gen'l Agts., ,02 lt:Z™& New York 



RECREATION. 



xin 



-\ 



m Pi SI &$ 



ill « III p'*"* **'» 8S 5S H H H II* 

- l5 ,"*|iiiHTjiir 



hi ? m MsO# § sg jgr 4;,. 



v 






CHAMPLAIN 



Known Everywhere as One of the Most 
Magnificent Summer Hotels in America 

Located on a bold eminence on the shore of Lake Champlain 
in the center of a natural forest park of 450 acres. 

Superb views of the Lake and Green Mountains of Vermont 
to the East, and the highest peaks and ranges of the Adiron- 
dacks to the West. 

r*r\i rj on full-length 18-hole course, kept in pink of con- 
vJULf dition. Attractive club-house with all TpPNlVIQ 
conveniences. Finest courts in the Adirondacks for 1 El 1 1 1 lo 

BOATING, FISHING, and fine fresh-water bathing. IDEAL 
SOCIAL LIFE for Young People. Splendid roads for 
automobiling. 

HOTEL CHAMPLAIN is three miles from Plattsburg, N. Y., 
on main line Delaware & Hudson R. R., and is reached in 
through Pullmans. 

A beautiful booklet of illustrations sent upon request. 



E. L. BROWN, Mgr, 

Hotel Champlain 

Clinton Co. 

N.Y. 



XIV 



RECREATION. 




B HUling 



fl>iano 



is a joy in any household. You can get a strictly high- 
grade piano by writing us direct and can save$ioo 
to $200 on it. Sent on trial. We pay freight. Easy 
monthly payments. No money required in advance. 
In 36 years we have sold 33,000 pianos and refer to 
over 33,000 satisfied purchasers. Wing Pianos are 
guaranteed for 12 years. "Book of Information about 
Pianos" sent free on request. Mention Recreation. 

Wiling &, Son 

350 to 356 UL 13ib St. flew Vork 




RECREATION. 



xv 



ALEXANDRA ' ' t fr A 
$T. LAWRtNC^ * 



=\* 



NEW YORK. 



L. 




STAPLES &DEWITT, Propfc. 



looo island Bouse 

In the midst of the "Thousand Islands," 
the so-called "Venice of America," and 
really the most charming and delight- 
ful Summer Resort on the Continent. 

Send us two 2-cent stamps and we will send you a beautifully 
illustrated guide book. Mention Recreation. 

STAPLES & DEWITT, Proprietors. 

Alexandria Bay, It V. 



XVI 



RECREATION. 




EMILIO DE OJEDA SAYS: 

Spanish Legation, "Washington, D. C. 
I have used HAYNER WHISKEY in the legation for medicinal 
and table purposes and I consider it so exception- -^f^cc© 
ally good that I will serve it to my guests in fature. 




Spanish Minister to U. S. 



THE ONLY WHISKEY WITH A NATIONAL REPUTATION FOR 
HIGHEST QUALITY AND PERFECT PURITY. 

Government statistics show that the famous Miami Valley produces better grain and 
has purer water than any other section of this country. It is Nature's garden. Right in 
the heart of this favored spot is our distillery. We have at our very door the two essen- 
tials for producing the finest whiskey in the world--the best grain and the purest water. 
Add to these one of the most completely equipped distilleries ever operated and an ex- 
perience of 38 years in distilling whiskey and you have a combination that is unequaled 
anywhere. That's why HAYNER WHISKEY is the best for medicinal and other uses. That's 
why we have over half a million satisfied customers. That's why YOU should try it. 
Don't forget that it goes direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, 
richness and flavor, carries a UNITED STATES REGISTERED DISTILLER'S GUARANTEE of PURITY and 
AGE and saves the dealers' enormous profits. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

FULL QUARTS $ 

EXPRESS CHARGES PAID BY US. 

MID AEEED We wil1 send y° u F0UR FUL| - Q uar t bottles of hayner seven- 

Ulin UrrCIl YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20. and we will pay the express charges. 
Try it and if you don't find it all right and as good as you ever used or can buy 
from anybody else at any price, then send it back at our expense and your 
$3.20 will be returned to you by next mail. Just think that offer over. How 
could it be fairer? If you are not perfectly satisfied you are not out a cent. 
We ship in a plain sealed case, no marks to show what's inside. 

Orders for Ariz., Cal., Col., Idaho, Mont., Nev..N.Mex.. Ore., Utah., Wash., or Wyo. 
must be on the basis of 4 QUARTS for $4.00 by EXPRESS PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by 
FREIGHT PREPAID. V 3 




ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY 
TROY, OHIO. 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO., ST. PAUL, MINN., ATLANTA, GA., 





SCATTERED OVER THE YARD WERE SCORES OF CRANES. 



RECREATION. 



Volume XXI. 



JULY, 1904 
G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager 



Number 1 



A QUESTION OF IDENTIFICATION. 



LOUIS T. MCKIM. 



Jack stood on one leg in about 2 
inches of warm water which covered 
the bottom of the tub. It was the 
only damp spot on the premises, 
and the day was sultry. He in- 
tended to sleep there until the horses 
came home from work and then he 
could take a fresh water bath after 
they had finished drinking. He slept 
quite undisturbed, for the children 
found it too hot to play with him and 
the pig, lacking the energy necessary 
for a spirited fight, had been van- 
quished by a few sturdy blows and 
now lay on the shady side of the tub 
grunting lazily. The afternoon wore 
slowly away with no change any- 
where, except as Jack changed feet or 
his companion turned from one side 
to the other. 

Jack was a 5-year-old sandhill 
crane, and was the pet of the family. 
He had been captured when a wee, 
fuzzy fellow. After a few days he 
had been contented to cast in his lot 
with the hens and ducks and had never 
shown any inclination to change. 
When a year old his owner, John 
Knolton, had cruelly suspected him, 
and had clipped his wings. John was, 
however, thoroughly ashamed of his 
lack of confidence, and never again re- 
peated the operation. When any of 
Jack's friends flew by he would 
stretch his long neck and utter a few 
calls. On several occasions he had 
even visited them as they lit on the 
surrounding fields ; but farther than 
this he never seemed to show any in- 



terest in wild life. He was good 
company to John Knolton in the fields 
as he followed the plow or harrow and 
picked bugs from the freshly turned 
earth. The children loved Jack, and 
he pecked them all quite impartially 
and ran away from them when he 
grew tired. Even Mrs. Knolton her- 
self, busy with her work, liked to see 
him about the yard, and though she 
threatened him direfully when he 
walked across her clean floors with 
muddy feet, she forgot it all when he 
went with her after the cows. 

Mr. Knolton at last came home, and 
Jack got out of the barrel, flopped his 
wings, struck a blow or 2 at the pig, 
and stuck his head into the cool fresh 
water as it fell from the pail. 

"Well, Jack," said his master, "I 
saw lots of big fellows like you to- 
day. If I had had my gun we should 
have crane for supper." 

Jack was busy with his toilet, and 
paid no attention to this bloodthirsty 
remark. 

"I say, Jack, old fellow," went on 
Knolton, hitting Jack a friendly slap 
on the head. "Do you hear that, you 
rascal? Crane for supper, Jack." 

Jack paid not the least heed but in- 
terrupted his bath to catch a grass- 
hopper and then went on with his 
work as if crane 3 times a day did 
not affect him. His master put away 
his team and went in to tea. 

At the supper table Mr. Knolton 
told of the great number of cranes 
about, and the bacon seemed twice as 



RECREATION. 



dry and salty, as the family thought of 
a juicy fat crane done to a delicious 
brown. The little Knoltons went to 
bed with visions of drumsticks and 
soft dressing that would be almost 
like Christmas. 

Early in the morning Knolton was 
awakened by a great noise in the barn 
yard. He got up at once and ran to 
the window. Raising the blind he 
saw a sight that made his nerves tin- 
gle. Scattered over the yard, by the 
well and even on the stable, were 
scores of cranes. He understood it 
in a moment. A late flock had decided 
to pass the night on the fresh fields, 
but attracted by calls from Jack, had 
come right into the yard. They were 
quite at ease, flapping their wings and 
beginning to move about as it grew 
daylight. 

All feverish with excitement Knol- 
ton loaded his old gun, pounding down 
the powder with muffled strokes and 
spilling some shot, which sounded on 
the floor like hail. When all was 
ready he went quietly to the window 
and opened it. The flock were grad- 
ually moving away from the house, 
showing signs of restlessness. Knol- 
ton hesitated a moment. What if he 
should kill Jack? Not likely among 
so many. Still he hesitated. They 
were getting farther ofT. Soon his 
gun would not reach them. Then 
with joy he noticed one leave the 
flock and turn back. That must be 
Jack. Knolton raised his gun and 
fired into the flock. 

With a mighty clamor and flopping, 
fully ioo blue cranes rose into the 
air and sailed away, leaving one of 
their number dead on the ground. 
Knolton rushed on the game and 
started in triumph with it to the house. 
Suddenly he turned in alarm. Where 
was Jack? He was nowhere to be 
seen and considerable hunting and 
calling only assured Knolton that 
Jack was gone. Thoroughly fright- 
ened, Knolton returned to his game. 
This then must be Jack. His master 



felt like a murderer. Lifting the dead 
bird tenderly he bore him to the house. 
His wife and children were up and 
received the news woefully. The chil- 
dren recognized Jack by a thousand 
little marks and both their parents 
could now identify him. 

A sad party took breakfast that 
morning at Knolton's. The children 
looked with tearful, reproaching eyes 
at their father, and Mrs. Knolton shed 
silent tears. Knolton ate little, feel- 
ing too much like a criminal, and he 
would have given his best cow if 
he could have put life into that poor 
bird. 

After breakfast the whole family 
went to the garden, where Mr. Knol- 
ton dug a drave in the corner of the 
plot and Jack was buried, wrapped in 
white and enclosed in a soap box. 
Many tears were shed over his grave 
and a small wooden slab was placed 
to mark his resting place. The chil- 
dren planted flower seeds around it 
and great gloom settled over the 
family. 

With heavy heart Mr. Knolton 
went to his work that day. He 
plowed till noon and then unhitched 
and turned his horses' head toward 
home. As he went slowly along he 
heard in the distance the familiar cry 
of the lone crane. It made him shiver. 
Nearer and nearer it came until it 
seemed so close that he wondered at 
its boldness. Looking up he saw it 
coming straight for him. It lit a 
few paces from him and walked 
across to him in quite the same old 
way. Filled with joy Knowlton hur- 
ried home while the mild horses won- 
dered at his haste. The children 
ran out to meet him, clasped the bird 
round the neck and kissed him. 
Even the pig squealed gleefully and 
at once renewed his attacks. 

As for Jack's double, the little 
Knoltons say that Pa dug in the 
garden that afternoon and that there 
was crane on the bill of fare at sup- 
per time. 




AMATEUR FHOTO BY JAMES H. MILLE«- 



NEST AND EGGS OF VIRGINIA RAIL. 
One of the 17th Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 




EVERY TIME HE TOUCHED THE GROUND HE WENT INTO THE AIR AS IF HE HAD 

HIT A LIVE WIRE. 
6 



THE PERSONNEL OF THE PACK TRAIN. 



G. 0. SHIELDS. 
Photos by the Author. 



Horses have their individuality, as well 
as people, and though the horse can not 
talk, he manages to make characteristics 
known to those about him in actions 
which often are more forcible than words. 

Some horses are vicious, others gentle, 
others wild, others tame, etc. ; but few people 
who have not handled or studied horses 
are aware that 2 gentle horses may be as 
totally different in their mental make up 
as any 2 good natured people are. Two 
vicious horses may be entirely opposite in 
their methods of showing it. 

There is no better place to study the per- 
sonal peculiarities, whims, eccentricities, or 
general cussedness of a number of horses 
than at the tail end of a pack train. 
Did you ever ride behind one? If not, you 
have a great treat in store for the future 
and should not fail to avail of it at some 
time. Such an experience is a never end- 
ing source of fun, worry, amusement and 
provocation by turns ; and you will some- 
times experience all these emotions within 
5 minutes. 

The pack train is pre-eminently a West- 
ern institution. In fact, it is the only way 
of getting over the wild mountain trails 
with any comfort. The West is a country 
of magnificent distances, and a man who 
undertakes to walk and carry his luggage, 
or have it carried by other men, as is the 
custom in the Adirondacks or Maine, is in 
hard luck. There are few streams in the 
mountain regions of the West that can 
be safely run with canoe or boat, as can 
most of the streams in the East. So for 
a long tour in the mountains the sad- 
dle horse is the passenger car and the pack 
horse is the freight car. An outfit of sad- 
dle and pack horses is, therefore, called a 
pack train. 

I rode thousands of miles with 
such trains, and I always choose the posi- 
tion of rear guard because the horses or 
mules are such a never ending source of 
amusement. Furthermore, I have always 
had a good deal of valuable property in the 
loads and naturally wished to be where 
I could keep an eye on it, to see if any- 
thing fell off or was damaged in transit. 

During the past summer we traveled 
about 300 miles in the saddle. By "we" I 
mean my old hunting companion, W. H. 
Wright, Tom, our packer, and your Uncle 
Eli. 

' We had 6 pack horses, named, respec- 
tively, Buck, Billy, Nitchie, Brownie, 



Darkey and Maude. All were good, faith- 
ful critters, but some were better than oth- 
ers. All had good traits about them and 
some of them had mighty bad ones. Some 
were brimful of general cussedness and 
some so faithful and attentive to duty that 
1 became warmly attached to them. 

These horses were all raised and broken 
by Indians. Some of them came from the 
Stonies and some from the Blood Indians. 
The Stonies live in the mountains and the 
Bloods on the prairies, and the horses 
showed, in their work, the results of their 
early training. Those that came from the 
Stony camp were typical mountain climb- 
ers, and nothing was too steep or too diffi- 
cult for them. The Blood ponies were 
at a disadvantage in the rough country, but 
could distance the others when we struck 
a bit of prairie trail. 

Old Buckskin was a big, stocky, squarely 
built, flat backed horse with a leg under 
each corner, as the boy said, and always 
attended strictly to business. He had his 
own way of doing his work, which was not 
always our way,, but he usually got through 
it safely. 

The packer always rides at the head of 
the train, and Buckskin's place was next to 
him. When we finished packing in the 
morning and Tom mounted his horse and 
said, "Come on, Buck," that veteran lined 
in behind Foxy and would be found close 
behind him when we reached the next 
camp. 

I said Buckskin was a flat backed horse. 
That was partly due to the fact that we 
kept him fat all summer. His back was so 
flat that the pack lay on it as it would lie 
on a table. One day he was loitering by 
the wayside. Wright picked up a bit of 
shale and shied it at him. It struck the 
pack, dropped on Buck's rump and lay 
there until we had gone half a mile. If 
one should pour water on Buck's back only 
a part of it would run off. 

Buck is a faithful old horse, but he has 
a beastly way of going out of the trail 
when he should stay in it. He always 
thinks he knows a better way of getting 
around a hole or a log than the one the 
packer selects, and whenever the leader 
struck a bad place, Buck, instead of fol- 
lowing his file leader as he should, would 
undertake a flank movement. In many 
cases he would get in trouble and Wright 
and I would have to help him out. The trail 
is always supposed to be made in the best 



8 



RECREATION. 



place, and the best pack horses follow their 
leaders through thick and thin. If a Smart 
Aleck undertakes to go around a bog, gets 
in up to his neck and you have to get off, 
wade in and help him out, you are tempted 
to say things that would not sound well in 
Sunday school. 

Buck scared me stiff half a dozen times 
when fording big creeks and rivers. If he 
saw Tom's saddle horse go in up to his 
belly, Buck would straightway conclude he 
could find a shallower place, and he often 
came near going in up to his neck before 
we could head him off. We always tried 
to make up the packs so they would stand 
dumping in the river without getting wet ; 
but this is sometimes impossible. If you 
have a valuable camera and a lot of still 
more valuable exposed plates in a pack 
which is not thoroughly waterproof, and 
see the horse that carries them heading for 
a deep hole, the chills are apt to chase one 
another up and down your spine mighty 
fast. We finally learned to put packs on 
Buck with which he could swim, if he 
wanted to, and we put the cameras, the 
sugar, the cigars, the cereals, and other 
perishable goods on a more obedient horse. 

Old Buck gave us the only genuine ex- 
hibition of Wild West rough bucking we 
had on the trip. On our way to Banff, 
after we had broken our last camp, we 
were going through a patch of burnt tim- 
ber when Darkey jammed one of his side 
packs against a dead tree, about 4 inches 
in diameter and 30 feet high. The tree 
went down with a wild sweep, and hit old 
Buck across the hind quarters, just as he 
was reaching for a bite of grass. The dead 
branches crashed over the poor creature 
with a racket that would have wakened a 
dead horse ; and Buck was not dead, by a 
long way. He quit the outfit, struck into 
a meadow near and started to run in a 
circle, hitting only the high places. Every 
time he touched the ground he went into 
the air as if he had hit a live wire. He 
doubled, and turned, and bent his back ac- 
cording to the most approved methods of 
thoroughbred bucking. The load was on 
to stay, but it could not stay through such 
a siege, and Buck never quit until he 
dumped the whole outfit and had wrapped 
the lash rope several times around both 
hind legs. If he had not succeeded in do- 
ing himself up that way he might have been 
bucking yet, for all I know ; for he went at 
it with an apparent determination to stay 
until he got through. 

Later in the day another horse ran 
against a dead limb, which broke with a 
loud report, and Buck's head was in the 
air in an instant, to see if the tree was 
coming his way. He was ready to unload 
again, if need be, but it wasn't. 

Buck does not tolerate any undue famili- 



arity on the part of his traveling compan- 
ions, or of strange horses. When we 
turned out the bunch at night Buck always 
stayed near the others, but did not care 
to be too near them, nor to have them 
come too near him. If any one of them 
came rubbering around, trying to be 
chummy with Buck, he was likely to get a 
gentle reminder in the shape of an im- 
pression of Buck's teeth, or one of his hind 
feet, whichever happened to be nearest to 
the intruder at the time. We were pass- 
ing through a little mining town and an 
old horse was picketed near the main street. 
He offered to greet the visitors warmly, and 
walked up to Buck, trying to touch noses 
and be friendly. Buck made a dive for 
him with his mouth open like that of a big 
alligator, and it looked as if he was going 
to bite the old horse's neck off. The re- 
ception committee changed its mind sud- 
denly, and made a dash to the rear. He 
stood looking at us until we were out of 
sight, and seemed to be saying to himself, 
"Well, that's the surliest old cuss I ever 
saw." 

With all his faults, Buck is one of the 
most powerful and enduring brutes I ever 
knew, and if I were making up a pack 
train for a summer tour I would gladly 
give $100 for him, though good pack horses 
sell in that country at $30 to $40. 

Billy is a large, long legged, lanky bay 
horse and attends to his own business 
about as well as any in the train. He is 
slow of motion and usually drifts to the 
tail end of the procession early in the day. 
A quirt has no terrors for him, so I had 
plenty of chance to develop the muscles in 
my right arm, in order to keep him in 
sight of the outfit. He has a coming appe- 
tite and an ungovernable fondness for 
dropping out of the trail to nab a tempt- 
ing bunch of grass or brush; but barring 
these little digressions he stays in line 
and saws wood, from morning till night. 
He cares not how big a load is put on 
him, nor how much tinware, how many 
kettles, or anything else it contains, or how 
much racket they make. All is freight that 
comes his way and whatever is put on him 
in the morning will be there at night, when 
camp is struck. 

Brownie is made up much like Buck, 
both mentally and physically, excepting 
that he is wholly contented to stay in the 
trail. Only occasionally does he leave it, 
when passing an unusually tempting bit 
of grass, and a warning from the driver 
sends him on a jump into his proper place. 
He is as brawny as an ox and will not 
rebel if 500 pounds are put on him. For- 
tunately, we did not have to load any of 
our horses above 250 pounds, and most of 
the time the heaviest loads did not weigh 
200 pounds. Old Brownie was so faithful 



THE PERSONNEL OF THE PACK TRAIN. 



and attentive to business that after the first 
few days he was chosen to carry the cam- 
eras and the photo supplies, and always 
landed them in camp safe. His one failing 
was that he was not willing to have any 
other horse than his regular file leader go 
ahead of him in the trail, and if one under- 
took to intrude, Brownie would go for him 
with his mouth open as if he were going 
to bite him in 2. If the interloper did not 
take the hint and make himself scarce he 
was liable to get severely chewed. Brownie 
posed as a cannibal. One would think to 
see him go for an unwelcome neighbor, that 
he was going to bite out a chunk and eat 
it raw ; but he did more bluffing than real 
biting. 

Darkey was so named because he was 
blacker than Brownie, and because his own- 
er liked him too well to call him Nigger- 
Darkey is a jet black, plump, shining, hand- 
some little cayuse, and weighs about 650 
pounds. He is as wild as the famous horses 
of Tartary, yet means to be as gentle 
as a kitten. He always acted as if he 
thought he was going to be basted with a 
club every time we started to pack him. 
When any of us picked up a bundle and 
started to put it on him he would jump 
as if he thought it was full of hornets. 
By treating him with the utmost kindness 
and gentleness, we tamed him a good deal, 
during the 3 months we had him, but still 
he showed his shy and retiring disposition 
to the last. I imagine he had been shame- 
fully abused when being broken for the 
pack, but I believe if we had worked him 
another 2 months he would have been en- 
tirely cured of his early impressions. 

When once the load was put on Darkey, 
and he was turned loose, there was no 
more trouble with him. He never devel- 
oped a bad trait on the trail, but always 
attended strictly to business, stayed in his 
place and if, in any kind of a mixup, he 
lost his file leader a moment, Darkey took 
advantage of the first opportunity to get 
back to his proper place. 

We had a lot of fun with Darkey about 
yellow jackets. We stirred up about 50 of 
their nests in or close to the trail, during 
the trip, and Darkey never seemed to get 
on to their curves. The other horses, when 
they saw trouble of this kind ahead, would 
leave the trail, and shy around the storm 
center ; but poor little Darkey would go on 
about his business. When he reached the 
yellow jackets' nest the first one or 2 would 
hit him on the fore leg. Darkey always 
seemed to think they were horse flies, and 
would stop to fight them off. By that time 
half a dozen others would land on him at 
various points, wake him up to the real 
situation, and he would stampede. Then 
the other horses must get out of his way, 



or be run over. He would knock down 
dead trees, or live horses, or men, or any- 
thing else that got in his way until he 
placed several acres of land between him 
and the scene of trouble. 

Maude was one of the most interesting 
studies in the whole train. She was wild, 
uncontrollable and reckless. She had no 
fixed place in the line of march, and if we 
put her in a certain file when leaving camp, 
she would not stay there 10 minutes. She 
would break out and in and would follow 
every horse in the train, by turns. She 
never stayed in the trail a mile at a time, 
if there was any possible chance of getting 
out without breaking her blooming neck. 
No matter how good the trail might be, 
how deep the mud, how thick the brush 
or intricate the barricade of fallen trees, 
how dangerous the slide rocks on both 
sides of the trail, Maude would sail out to 
one side and get in trouble if possible. If 
we were traveling in an open country she 
was constantly on the wing, on either side 
of the trail, like a high strung pointer hunt- 
ing birds. She caused more profanity than 
all the other horses together. I wore out 
my quirt and my vocal organs, day after 
day, trying to break her of this pernicious, 
habit, but all to no avail. She was as su- 
premely pestiferous the last day of the trip 
as the first. 

We called her all kinds of names. For 
instance, the Lamp Shade Girl, on account 
of the peculiar shape which her load as- 
sumed one day. At other times we 
dubbed her Maude the Ranger. Some- 
times when she was gentle and lovable a 
few minutes we called her Maude Adams. 
Again, when she gave us an exhibi- 
tion of her uncontrollable spirits, we called 
her Maude Byron. When, after a hard 
day's work, she began to show the effects 
of old age, we called her Maude Granger. 
When she was especially kind and affec- 
tionate, we called her Maude Brock- 
way. Again, when we went out to look 
for her in the morning and could not find 
her,_ we called her Maude Gonne. 
Wright and Tom sometimes called her 
other names, that would not do to print, 
so I skip them. 

We asked Brewster what he ever bought 
such an intractable creature for, anyway. 
He said he did not buy her ; that an Indian 
came along one day leading her, and want- 
ed to trade her for some other horse, 
any old horse he .could get. Brewster had 
in the corral at the time a big, vicious 
bronco that no one had ever been able to 
ride or pack without getting killed or his 
outfit kicked into the next province. 

"And," said Billy, "I told the Indian to 
turn the mare into the corral and take the 
horse. He did so, and I never heard what 



10 



RECREATION. 



became of him. In fact, I don't want to 
hear, for I have no doubt the bronco killed 
him." 

Last and least of the pack horses was 
little Nitchie, another pestiferous nuisance. 
He is even smaller than Darkey, and is a 
general all around fake. When there was 
any work to do he always pretended to be 
lame in his right fore leg ; but when we 
would strike camp, and turn the bunch out, 
he was as frisky as any of them, and never 
limped from that time until packing time 
came again. 

I don't know where they found his name, 
but he was probably called after Nitchie 
Novgorod, a city in Russia, or Siberia, or 
Rhode Island, I have forgotten which. 

Nitchie always made more protests 
against being packed than any other horse 
in the gang. When we put up the first 
bundle, no matter if it did not weigh more 
than 15 pounds, he would sway to the 
other side, and groan, and stagger, and 
make faces, as if it were breaking his back 
When the opposite pack was put up, he 
would lean against the fellow on this side 
and put up similar bluffs. When the top 
pack went on, he would pretend this was 
indeed the last straw, the one that was 
really going to kill him, and we could 
scarcely keep him from lying down. 

He never carried more than 125 pounds 
any time during the summer ; but one 
would think from the desperate pretenses 
he made when being loaded, that we were 
putting 400 pounds on him. 

When we came to cinching the load, 
Nitchie would spread himself all over the 
camp, grunt and fall about as if he were 
being cut in 2, though we were always care- 
ful not to cinch him so tightly as the other 
horses. 

When we got on the trail Nitchie seemed 
to forget all about having anything to carry, 
and was the first to drop out of the ranks 
and graze. He had an appetite like that of 
an ostrich. No matter if he had been in 
grass knee high all the afternoon and 
night, he never seemed to get enough, and 
10 minutes out of camp he could not pass 
a tempting bite without making a dive 
for it. We showed him a good deal of 
mercy on account of his being the runt of 
the outfit, and on account of his being, or 
pretending to be, lame. He was so persist- 
ent in his grazing habit that about once 
every half hour it became necessary to wake 
him up and set him going. He would even 
go 30 or 40 feet from the trail to get into 
a good bunch of grass. At such times I 
would spur my horse and run up on him 
before he knew I was coming, and I would 
land a hot one on his rump with the whip, 
following it with 2 or 3 more before he 
could get out of reach. When he would 
get back into the train he would stop and 



look back at me as much as to say, "How 
the devil did you ever get up there without 
letting me know it?" 

Nitchie was by all odds the clown of the 
bunch, and afforded us more fun than all 
the other horses combined. 

The saddle horses have their own private 
opinions and tastes, and their own ways of 




NELLIE. 

doing things, as well as the pack horses. 

Foxy, otherwise called the Red Fox, be- 
cause of his wearing the color of that ani- 
mal, was Tom's saddle horse. He was the 
dude of the outfit, the handsomest pony 
of the lot, with the possible exception of 
Darkey. These 2 would have tied for first 
place in a beauty show. Foxy was fat, 
sleek and his red coat glistened in the sun 
light like a newly painted automobile. 

Wright's saddle horse bears the homely, 
commonplace name of Nellie. She is a 
little buckskin, and is so woefully awk- 
ward, yet so anxious to be -good, that she 
enlisted the sympathy of the entire party. 
'She was always stumbling or staggering, or 
getting into trouble of some kind. Her spe- 
cialty was going on the other side of every 
tree she came to. Wright liked to walk 
and lead his horse, and Nellie would leave 
a good trail any time to go on the other 
side of a tree from that on which Wright 
had gone. Then Wright would say things. 
Meantime he would have to back up and 
pull the mare around on his side, or else 
go on her side of the tree. I never knew 
a horse that could do so many things in a 
given time to provoke uncomplimentary re- 
marks on the part of a master as Nellie 
could. She didn't mean it. She was sim- 
ply built that way, and could not help it. 

Last and largest is Baldy ; true, faithful, 
kind, untiring old Baldy. That was what 
his owners called him, because he has a 
clean face ; but he is deserving of a better 
name, and after a month of intimate ac- 
quaintance with him I christened him Old 
Surefoot. He carried me about 300 miles 



THE PERSONNEL OF THE PACK TRAIN. 



ii 



in the course of the summer, and at least 
290 of that distance was over the most in- 
famous trails that could be found on the 
earth. As I have before intimated, we had 
down timber, criscrossed and piled in 
every shape that Satan could ever invent. 
We had rocks scrambled and jumbled in 
every way an earthquake, or a volcano, or 
any possible shaking up of the earth could 
ever place them. We had muskeags with 
bottoms 3 feet below the surface, and oth- 



little good trail there was, and only 
fell with me once. Not once did he 
make a misstep, and no matter how steep 
the hill, if I saw fit to ride up or down he 
always landed me at the top or the bottom, 
as the case might be, right end up with 
care. He fell with me just once, but I do 
not blame him for that. We were crossing 
a big bog through which ran a brook, about 
4 feet wide and 3 feet deep. Old Surefoot 
went in all right, and would have gone out 




OLD SUREFOOT. 



ers without bottom. We forded creeks 
running white over big boulders, and rivers 
of innumerable channels, that ran through 
serpentine ways over beds of quicksand. 
We climbed hills that were so straight up 
they leaned back, and we descended others 
that were a little more than straight down. 
Of course, I always dismount and lead my 
horse up and down the steep places, and 
over as many of the other bad places as 
possible, but in some cases you must ride 
or stay where you are. Old Surefoot took 
me over all such bad spots and over what 



properly on the other side if he had had a 
decent show ; but when he undertook to 
mount the opposite bank one foot went 
through the overhanging sod clear up to 
his breast, and his hind foot being in the 
middle of the creek, deep in the mud, the 
situation was a little too much for him 
and he took a header. Any horse would 
have done likewise in his place. If I had 
been carrying a big man I would have 
dumped him in the creek, too. 

Old Surefoot was as strong as an ox, 
yet as kind and as gentle as a kitten. I 



12 



RECREATION. 



don't believe he knew how to buck, 
but he had one peculiarity; he seemed 
to have bad dreams at night. Every 
few minutes, during the first 3 or 4 
miles out from camp, he would seem to 
imagine that some beast was springing at 
him from behind, and he would make a 
desperate leap to get away from it. At 
first he came near going out from under 
me, but I remembered his trick from that 
on, and was always careful to keep a good 
seat in the saddle. Surefoot must have 
killed some Indian in his younger days, 
who probably had beaten or abused him in 
some way, and possibly the ghost of the 
red man came back and haunted the old 
horse. Whether this was so or not, there 
was something on his mind, and it affected 
him mostly at night. 

Naturally, I became warmly attached to 
the dear old beast, and one of the most 
trying experiences of my life was parting 



with him when I came away. I would have 
brought him home, if I could have done so 
reasonably, but I knew he would not shine 
among the fine haired horses of the East. 
I got stuck on another cayuse years ago, 
and brought him all the way from Spokane 
to Chicago, where I lived at the time. He 
had carried me over hundreds of miles of 
mountain trails, and through all kinds of 
difficulties ; but he could not sabe the city 
streets. I lent him to a friend to ride one 
day, and the poor little cayuse slipped on 
a street car rail, broke his fetlock joint, 
and we had to kill him. That is why I did 
not think it best to negotiate for permission 
to bring Surefoot to New York. How- 
ever, I made Brewster promise me, with 
his hand on his heart, that he would never 
allow Surefoot to carry a pack, and that 
he would kill any man at sight who might 
ever undertake to abuse the horse in any 
way. 



Cheerful Widow — Why so dismal? 

Future Husband — I am afraid our wed- 
ding trip will take all the cash I have 
saved. 

Cheerful Widow — What of it? A wed- 
ding trip only happens once in 5 or 6 years. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. P. HAMBLY. 

THE BLUE HERON IN HIS FAVORITE HAUNT. 



Winner of 33rd Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



THE SCOTERS. 



ALLAN BROOKS. 



Scoters, those large black ducks more 
generally known as sea coots in America, 
are found throughout the Northern hemi- 
sphere. Except the eiders, they are the 
most maritime of ducks, being most abun- 
dant on the sea coasts, and are frequently 
seen far out of sight of land. They also 
occur more or less commonly on the larger 
lakes, and sometimes on smaller bodies of 
water, especially where these are of a sal- 
ine nature. Even when killed on fresh 
water the flesh of scoters is rank and fishy, 



move noiselessly, but on alighting again 
they make a few more whistling strokes and 
hold their wings pointed high up over the 
back until their impetus is exhausted. 

In diving, scoters open their wings slight- 
ly and plunge abruptly forward; but I do 
not think, from my own observations, that 
they use the^ wings when under water, pro- 
pelling themselves solely with their feet — 
huge webbed paddles, larger than those of 
any other duck. 

There are 6 species of scoters known to 






s#?«5:'.: 



5r 




WHITE WINGED SCOTER, OIDEMIA DEGLANDI. 



but numbers are eaten, when better ducks 
are not available, by masking their strong 
flavor with various condiments. 

Scoters are among the hardest of all 
waterfowl to kill. Not only are they most 
expert divers, but the quantity of shot they 
can carry is astonishing. They rise with 
difficulty, throwing great spouts of water 
up with each stroke of their powerful feet, 
which they use to help them clear the sur- 
face. Once clear their feet are spread wide 
apart until they are well on the wing. When 
rising they make a deep, whistling noise 
with their wings, especially noticeable in the 
water.. When in full flight their wings 



science. Of these, 3 are common to Amer- 
ica : the white winged, the surf and the 
American. The white winged scoter, Oide- 
mia deglandi, more commonly called white 
winged coot, is found from Atlantic to Pa- 
cific. In Europe and Northern Asia it is 
replaced by the velvet scoter, O. fusca, and 
in Northeast Asia by the Kamchatkan sco- 
ter, 0. stegneri, both of which are closely 
allied species, with the same general char- 
acter. 

The white winged scoter is the most num- 
erous and generally distributed of the genus 
in America, and is the species most fre- 
quently found on inland waters. From the 



13 



14 



RECREATION. 



other American species it can always be told 
by the broad white patch on the wing, which 
is present in both sexes. It is a large duck, 
large males weighing about 5 pounds. 

The note of the male is a high pitched, 
grating quack, seldom heard, as they are 
usually silent. 

When courting, the males chase one an- 
other along the surface of the water. 
Every now and then one will dive and come 
up underneath another male, which then af- 
fects great terror and immediately dives it- 
self, this play being repeated for hours. 

On the coast of Southern British Colum- 
bia great numbers of these birds can be 



red on inner and rose pink on outer sur- 
faces. In the female the iris is brown, bill 
blackish, and feet dusky reddish with black 
webs. 

The surf scoter, Oidemia perspicillata, the 
smallest of the genus, can always be told by 
the absence of white from the wing and the 
presence of a white patch on the nape in 
both sexes. In range and habits it nearly 
resembles the white winged species, but 
seems to prefer shallower water, feeding 
close in shore, often among the tumbling 
surf from which it derives its name. The 
note of the male is a curious liquid "puk," 
resembling a drop of water falling in some 




SURF SCOTER, OIDEMIA PERSPICILLATA. 



seen in summer, nearly all old males ; but 
none of the scoters breed there. The white 
winged species breeds in the Northern por- 
tion of the Province, East of the Rockies 
also, and even South of the 49th parallel. 
About the 1st of October great flights of fe- 
males and young arrive on the coasts. 
String follows string in rapid succession, 
flying in lines abreast, and not one behind 
the other. 

The male white winged scoter is a hand- 
some bird, his velvety, dead black plumage 
being relieved by the broad white wing 
patch, and small white mark behind the 
eyes. The iris in the male is white; bill 
orange red and white, with the knob and 
base black ; feet black, blotched with orange 



cavernous pool. This note is generally 
heard when the males are courting, 6 or 8 
of them whirling around like whirligig 
beetles, with their heads high in the air. 

The iris in the male is pearly white, bill 
vividly colored with red, orange, and Chi- 
nese white, the 2 hard bosses at the base 
black; feet red, the joints and webs dusky 
black. In the female the iris is grayish 
brown, bill blackish and feet dull red with 
webs blackish. 

The American scoter, Oidemia Ameri- 
cana, is nearly as large as the white winged. 
In the male American the plumage is en- 
tirely black. The female is lighter in color 
than either of the other species ; the light 
colored throat and cheeks and absence of a 








•Sililiisf- 



AMERICAN SCOTER, OIDEMIA AMERICANA. 



white wing bar being sufficient to distin- 
guish her from other female scoters of 
America. 

In the old world the American scoter is 
replaced by a closely allied species, Oidemia 
nigra. 

The American scoter is by far the most 
maritime of the 3 species found on this con- 
tinent, and I have never seen it inland, 
though it occurs on the great lakes. It 
loves to frequent the wild, open shores, sel- 
dom venturing into the land-locked harbors 
where the other species swarm ; in this re- 
spect resembling the harlequin duck, with 
which it often associates. 

Like the harlequin, small flocks of Amer- 
ican scoters, composed of half a dozen males 
and a female or 2, are constantly on the 
wing in fine, calm weather. A female leads, 
the males bunched in behind her, all utter- 
ing their plaintive call. After ascending 
some 50 feet from the water they swing 
around and alight a quarter of a mile away, 
when another flock will rise and go through 
the same performance. The cry is a sweet 
and mournful whistle, pitched in a low key. 
Once heard it will always conjure up vis- 
ions of the opal tinted, glassy reaches of the 
Pacific sounds, with their horizon of violet 
peaks in jagged outline against the saffron 
sky, the water studded with floating sea 
fowl and the air resonant with the mourn- 
ful cadence of the scoter's cries. The males 
also have another note, a hoarse, guttural 
chuckle, exactly like that of a small Eastern 
frog, When uttering it, the scoters shoot 



flat along the water, just as the frogs do. 
The American scoters rise with much less 
exertion than other scoters, and when on 
the wing the under side of the primaries 
looks conspicuously light colored. The iris 
is brown in both sexes. The bill in the male 
is black with an orange yellow knob at the 
base ; in the female, blackish with a trace 
of yellow toward base. The feet are brown- 
ish olive in both male and female. 




AMATEUR PHOTO EV J- B- PARKER- 
FEEDING THE BABY. 

Winner of 41st Prize in Recreation's 8th An- 
nual Photo Competition. 



IS 




A MIGHTY RIVER OF PIGEONS. 
16 



A NIGHT IN A PIGEON ROOST. 



WM. A. CRAWLEY. 



When a boy in my frontier home, I had 
netted, trapped or ensnared almost every 
species of game, but the wild pigeon was 
easily my favorite ; I can hardly tell why. 
Perhaps it was their singular beauty, their 
swiftness of flight, their sudden appearance 
in great numbers, and their recklessness, 
which almost invited capture. 

At that time I heard wonderful stories 
about wild pigeon roosts, which I could 
scarcely believe ; but these roosts were in 
the wilderness, so remote from civilization 
that I hardly expected ever to see one. I 
was, therefore, overjoyed when, at the age 
of 19. I unexpectedly had an opportunity 
of visiting the great pigeon roosts in Ar- 
kansas. 

I was a trooper, and we were construct- 
ing winter quarters near Brownsville, in. a 
woodland at the edge of a beautiful prairie, 
which lay to the East and North of us. 
Flocks of pigeons flew over our camp every 
day, going North, and I learned from an 
old citizen that they roosted only 8 miles 
distant, a little East of North of where we 
were then quartered. He said that if we 
would go to the roost at night with a lan- 
tern and a club we could in a short 
time kill all the pigeons we could carry 
away. I explained to him the scarcity of 
lanterns, and he suggested that a small wire 
basket in which we could carry burning 
pine knots would answer the purpose. 

I found some old telegranh wire and 
made 2 pear shaped baskets, with wire bales, 
each holding, perhaps, half a peck. As we 
were in a pine country, I soon gathered a 
supply of pine knots which made a bright 
light and were not easily extinguished. 

The old man had also suggested that we 
carry a bag at the left side, suspended from 
the shoulders, shot-pouch fashion. 

I decided to go at once, and soon found a 
comrade who was as anxious to visit tfoe 
roost as I was. It was necessary to start 
in daylight to reach the roost by dark, so 
we had to run the picket, but were not dis- 
covered. Our road lay across 4 miles of 
prairie and 4 miles of timber. Near the 
edge of the timber on the farther side of the 
prairie was a solitary tree known as the 
Lone Tree, and at that point the roads 
forked. The old settler had instructed me 
to take the road to the right. When we 
reached the tree, although we were 4 miles 
from the roost, we heard a dull, roaring 
sound, as of a heavy freight train, which 
made our hearts beat faster and caused us 
to quicken the pace of our horses. Enter- 
ing the woods at the farther edge of the 



prairie, we soon came into a creek bottom, 
and after crossing the creek we began to 
notice feathers in the road. The roaring 
sound had become so loud that we could 
hardly hear each other speak, and soon we 
came to a sight not easily forgotten. Even 
now I can liken it to nothing so much as a 
mighty river of pigeons rushing to the 
East, half a mile in width and 50 feet in 
depth. The bottom of this great river 
passed through the tree tops, and we were 
afterward told that no matter from what 
direction a flock of pigeons arrived at the 
roost, they always circled around and 
joined this mighty flight, moving to the 
East with the majesty of a great army. 

We could not resist the temptation to 
dismount and throw clubs among the 
pigeons. We also stood a long pole on end 
and by making it sway violently at the top 
tried to bring some of them down ; but 
they were experts at dodging and we had 
poor success at this. 

Our road led us to an elevated plateau 
where the pigeons were beginning to alight. 
Along this road we came to a small log 
dwelling. The proprietor, a typical Arkan- 
sas pioneer, stood in front of the house and 
to our inquiry as to how long the pigeons 
had been roosting there, he replied, 

"You cain't prove it by me. I hev bin 
here 30 year, and they was here when I 
come." 

We made camp in a clump of bushes and 
decided to get supper before making an as- 
sault on the roost. Gathering dry brush 
and wood, we soon had our coffee, bacon 
and hard bread, winding up with a smoke, 
during which we were able to take a survey 
of the roost. It covered more than 1,000 
acres of soil that was naturally poor, but 
which has been enriched by the dropoings 
of these birds for probably 50 years that it 
had grown up into a wilderness of almost 
every variety of tree and briar and shrub ; 
and the sheer weight of these birds had 
bent and twisted this tree growth into near- 
ly every shape and direction. Under every 
tree of any size were mounds formed by 
these droppings, often 3 feet in height. 
This jungle was well nigh impenetrable 
but for the paths made by fierce looking 
hogs in their hunt for dead and crippled 
pigeons. 

These birds would alight on a tree until 
every available space was occupied and then 
alight on each other until the tree became a 
quivering mass of pigeons. Often the 
breaking of a branch would cause this 
great mass to arise suddenly and the sound 



17 



18 



RECREATION. 



was like that of a discharge of a cannon. 
This was repeated every moment or 2 
throughout the roost during the entire 
night, causing such excitement and noise 
as one could witness nowhere else and 
which it is difficult to describe. Poor crea- 
tures ! After flying hundreds of miles to 
seek repose it was more like going to battle 
than to bed ! 

With our baskets filled with blazing pine 
knots, and our clubs, not over 15 inches in 
length and an inch in thickness, we began 
the assault on the feathered legions. The 
light so blinded their eyes that we went 
right among them, and from the low limbs 
and bushes we swiped them right and left. 
Sometimes on a low limb there were a 
dozen sitting in a row, and with a long, 
swinging stroke at their necks we brought 
down several. We noticed that unless we. 
hit their head or broke their wings, they 
would nearly always escape ; and a hard 
blow on the back, knocking the bird 10 or 
12 feet, almost always resulted in his flying 
away. 

Sometimes they were so tame and so un- 
conscious of danger that we plucked them 
from the low limbs and bushes as you 
would pluck apples, and pushed them into 
our sacks. When exhausted from the ex- 
citement and labor of wielding our clubs, 



we rested, as there was no danger of the 
birds' leaving until morning. 

Long after midnight, exhausted but filled 
with pleasant excitement, and with 2 bushel 
bags full of pigeons, we withdrew to find 
our horses and get some needed rest. This 
was more difficult than we had expected, 
for we had been so absorbed in the exciting 
sport that we did not bear in mind how far 
or in what direction we Went. After reach- 
ing our little camp, I concluded to empty 
one of the bags of pigeons and count them. 
From the heap one of them quietly flew 
away. He had merely been stunned and 
had recovered. 

We slept soundly, notwithstanding the 
great commotion around us, and were up 
soon after daylight. Just at sunrise I saw 
this feathered host arise in one vast cloud 
that darkened the sun, circle around the 
great roost, and rest a moment on the top- 
most branches. With the sun shining on 
them they resembled a great purple sea ! 
Then, breaking up into small detachments, 
they began to depart for the great grain 
fields of the Northwest. 

Soon we were on our way to camp, smok- 
ing our pipes, discussing our wonderful ex- 
perience, and speculating on pigeon pic, 
which we had in abundance for the next 
few days. 



APOSTROPHE TO A TROUT. 



J. B. CURRIE. 



Ho, ho ! my lusty trout ! 

At last I've hauled you out ! 

Ten times across your track 

I threw my Spanish Black ! 

Ten times against the wind 

I threw my Jenny Lind ! 

Drake, Moth, and Midge did duty, 

To tempt my speckled beauty ; 

But all, alas ! in vain ! 

You snubbed them with disdain ; 

Scarce sniffed them, as you rose, 

With piscatorial nose. 

Your tastes were animal, 

Nay, somewhat cannibal ; 

You fancied cleric bait, 

Determined to await 

My Parson's gorgeous gown, 

Which soon came floating down 



Toward that whirling eddy, 

Where you were making ready 

To curve your sinuous back, 

And make a fierce attack ! 

It came ; you saw, and took 

That Parson, with a hook ! 

You rose, you seized him quick ! 

That Parson did the trick ! 

Nay, gently ! Do not squirm, 

I hold you safe and firm. 

Lor ! How the boys will stare 

At you, my bonnie fare ! 

Nay, softly now, be still ! 

My hook is in your gill. 

You'll weigh, I trow, six pounds ! 

You'll measure twenty. . . . Zounds 

He's gone ! Oh, for my gaff ! 

Lor ! How the boys will chaff ! 



Skinflint — If anything should happen to 
me, dearest, you will be all right. I've just 
insured my life. 

Young Bride — But suppose nothing does 
happen to you? — Life. 



CAMPING AT CULVER'S LAKE. 



J. H. UHLE. 

Photos by the Author. 



In July, 1902, my brother and a friend and 
I went to Culver's lake, Sussex county, New 
Jersey. This lake lies at the foot of a 
spur of the Blue mountains, through 
which the Delaware river runs at the 
Water Gap, 35 miles away. It is one of 
several lakes which find their way to the 
Delaware river through the Paulius Kill. 
The lake is 3 miles wide, 2 miles long and 
has a shore line of 8 miles. A ride of 3 
hours on the D., L. & W railroad will take 
one to Branchville, the end of the line. 
From there it is a drive of 2 miles to 
Lyons' boat house, at the foot of the lake, 
where boats, bait, refreshments, etc., can 
be obtained; and visitors will find Frank, 
as Mr. Lyons is known to his friends, 
most accommodating. 

The shores of Culver's lake are rocky, 
with the exception of the inlet, which is 
shallow and filled with moss and lily pads. 
This inlet is one of the finest spots I 
have ever seen for pickerel and we had 
some grand sport there, just before dark, 
casting live bait and getting a strike al- 
most every time. 

Along the Eastern shore are many good 
fishing spots. The best of these is near 
the old pine tree on the point about half 
way up the lake. The knowing ones anchor 
on the bar running out from Savage Point. 
On one side of the boat the water will be 
10 feet deep and on the other it will be 
25. In fact, the fishing is good all around 
the lake. There are any number of fish, 
but they change their feeding grounds. 
Small mouth bass, perch and pickerel are 
large and the catfish are the finest I have 
ever tasted. The fishing while I was 
there was far below the average. There 
was so much rain washing bait from the 
shore that the fish had all the food they 
wanted. The largest fish taken was 5^ 
pounds. 

The best way to enjoy life at Culver's 
is under canvas. I had a delightful spot 
for my camp and in my odd moments 
made it homelike and comfortable by 
building rustic seats, etc. I had many 
callers to see the camp and try my Mor- 
ris chair. 

My cooking range attracted much at- 
tention. At first I made the regular camp 
range, with logs, and as usual it worked 
well except that I had to renew the logs 
every other day. I then made the same 
kind of a range using flat stones instead 
of the logs, and it was much better, but I 



found it hard to bend over so far to cook. 
My eyes got full of smoke and it was gen- 
erally inconvenient ; so I decided to try 
again. 

I cut 4 heavy stakes with a crotch near 
the. top and drove them in the ground till 




THE CAMP COOKING RANGE. 

they stood firm and strong. On the 
crotches I placed 2 long sticks, one on 
each side, 3 inches in diameter. Then 
several one inch sticks were placed across, 
forming sort of a grate. The large flat 
stones I had used on the ground I then 
placed on each side, directly over the 3 
inch logs to hold the weight. These 
stones were 8 inches high when placed in 
position. I covered the entire bottom, be- 
tween the rows of flat stones, with small 
flat stones which covered the cross sticks. 
This allowed a good draft, no matter which 
way the wind blew, which was not always 
possible when the fire was on the ground. 
I drove 2 long crotched sticks in the 
ground, one at each end; a green stick 
over the fire to hang the pots and kettles 
on ; and the range was complete. Two 
green sticks placed from one row of stones 
to the other hold the smaller cooking pans 
and can be as close together as is desired. 
The range can be made any size. Mine 
was 5 feet long, 2 feet wide and 3 feet 
high. It worked to perfection, the stones 
holding the heat a long while. 

With the first range I made I had sev- 
eral accidents, one of which was rather 
amusing. I was in a hurry one morning 
to get down the lake to keep an appoint- 



19 



20 



RECREATION. 



ment and as I had neglected to waken ear- 
ly I had to rush my breakfast. I made 
the canoe ready while the fire was getting 
up; then put the oat meal to cook on 
the crossbars, with the coffee pot hanging 
over it. I had a small fire but it was 
burning well and was hot. All was ready 
but as I took the coffee pot from the 
hook it slipped from the end, made one 
half turn and landed top side down in the 
oatmeal pan, w T hich also turned over, put- 
ting out the fire. I was 20 minutes late 
keeping my appointment, but I had my 
breakfast. 

Almost every day someone would pass 
the camp and ask, "Are you not lone- 
some here?" I became so tired of the 
question that I made a sign on a strip of 
birch bark, "I am not," to which I pointed 
when the question was asked. 

August 30th the farmers held their an- 
nual picnic, and as I was on the edge of 
the picnic grounds my camp was one of 
the attractions. I knew I would be both- 
ered by the farmers' questions, so I built a 
fence of grape vine around the camp, and 
along the top of the fence I twined some 
running thorn vines. It was amusing to 
see the people come up to the fence, start 
to lean on the top and then find it was 
heavy. 

I had some friends at camp that day, 
for a dinner of roast corn and flapjacks. 
While I was cooking the dinner a crowd 
lined up along the fence. They had never 
before seen the flapjacks flip, and were 
greatly interested. 

One day I had Mr. and Mrs. Lyons, 
from the boat house, with some friends, 
at camp for a fish dinner. They had never 
eaten fish baked in mud in a camp fire. 
They pronounced the fish and roasted corn 
"the best ever." 

I had several campfire parties, and every 
one greatly enjoyed them. I built the 
• regular camp fires with the back log 8 
feet long and 5 feet high ; and the fire was 
grand when well under way. During the 
evening I served roasted corn, hot choco- 
late and watermelon. There was always 
a rush for the Morris chair, and it was 
seldom unoccupied. 

To make that chair I cut 2 birch sap- 
lings 2 inches in diameter and 8 feet long 
and sharpened one end to drive in the 
ground at an angle of 25 degrees, or at 
any angle the chair is to be placed. Then 
I drove 2 crotched sticks well in the 
ground 3 feet, on the ground, from the 
long saplings, and slanting out, the ends 
of the crotches extending 4 inches above 
the long saplings. I placed a strong stick 
across the top of the extending crotches to 
support the seat. 
I made the seat by twining strong grape 



vine in and out from side to side. I held 
each end in place by the next vine I put 
on. The vines soon shape themselves to 
the body and are exceedingly comfortable. 
A blanket thrown over the chair softens 
sharp edges and points. I made a foot 




THE MORRIS CHAIR. 

rest by driving a crotch in the ground on 
each side and placing a heavy stick on the 
top. 

Just before I left the lake, a number of 
my friends from the city came up one 
Friday to spend Sunday and took a fur- 
nished cottage on the other side of the 
lake. Saturday morning it rained, so we 
all had to come in from fishing and enjoy 
ourselves as best we could. One of the 
boys had 2 reed poles out from the dock 
baited with frogs, while he sat on the 
porch out of the rain and watched the 
lines. He was talking and forgot all 
about fishing, until someone said: 

"Great Scott ! Look at that pole !" 

There it was, going out toward the 
middle of the lake, against the wind. The 
way that fellow went down the path to 
the dock was marvelous. He jumped into 
a boat, nearly falling out he was so excited, 
tried to get the oar in the oarlock, but 
could not ; so he took the oar and pad- 
dled, half the time the wrong way, till he 
was up to the pole. 

In the meanwhile the fish had jumped 
nearly 2 feet out of the water, in plain 
view of the people in the 2 cottages, and 
its weight was estimated at 4 to 8 pounds. 

As the man put down the oar and walked 



CAMPING AT CULVER'S LAKE. 



21 



toward the bow of the boat to grasp the 
pole, the boat went backward. The pole 
was 4 or 5 feet away and he could not 
reach it, so he sat down and used his 
hands as paddles. At last he was near 
enough to get hold of the pole, and the 
sport began. 

With one grand effort he tried to lift 
that fish from the water, but could not 
do it. The pole bent as if it was fast 
to a "rock fish." He got hold of the 
line and started to pull in as if he had 
hold of the anchor rope. As a result, we 
all had one more view of the bass, as he 
broke the snell, which was a wire one, 
for pickerel. The fish landed on the side 
of the boat and flopped back into the 
water. It was over 4 pounds if it was an 
ounce. Talk about the air being blue ! 
Then some one said: 

"Forget it." 

Within 10 minutes every one had on a 



storm coat and was out on the lake after 
that fish, but there was nothing doing. 

The view to be obtained at Culver's, 
from the top of the mountain on the 
Northwest, is beautiful. New York, Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey can be seen dis- 
tinctly. To the right is Lake Owassa, 
and the road winding through the trees 
like a long silver thread. On the other 
side of the mountain is the remains of 
another lake, now only a small pond, 
while in the distance is the hill that forms 
the Jersey side of the Delaware. 

The walk to the mountain is popular, 
and parties go up every day, rowing to the 
landing on the other side of the lake near 
the inlet, walking back to the main road 
past 2 of the best springs in the State, 
whose water is only 2 degrees colder in the 
winter than in the summer, and then taking 
the path up the side of the mountain. The 
view is well worth the climb. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. D. GAY. 



HONEYSUCKLE CAMP. 

Winner of 37th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 
Made with a Cycle Poco Camera. 




ROUND THE CAMP FIRE. 

Winner of 48th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY L. F WESTON. 




A WOODCHUCK SUNNING HIMSELF. 

Winner of 42nd Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 

Made with a Korona Camera. Velox Paper. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY F. S. ANDRUS 



WHEN THE PTARMIGAN CHANGES COLOR. 



I spent the fall and a winter of '97 about 
Log Cabin, Lake Bennett, and at Lake 
Toochi, and between September and April 
I killed many grouse. There seemed to be 
3 different kinds of grouse, yet they looked 
much alike during that time ; that is, there 
was scarcely any difference in the plu- 
mage. 

In the early winter we found in the open 
country near Log Cabin a grouse that was 
almost white, having a few black feathers 



hard hunting when I wanted fresh meat. 
J. H. Ferryman, Omaha, Neb. 

I referred Mr. Ferryman's letter to Dr. 
A. K. Fisher, of the U. S. Agricultural De- 
partment, who writes as follows : 

Three forms of ptarmigan may occur in 
the general vicinity of White Pass. The 
white tailed ptarmigan, a rather small, 
mountain dwelling species which occurs 
from Alaska Southward to Mount Tacoma 




A GROUP OF CHANGELINGS. 



in the wings and tail. This bird was of 
fairly good size. Between Log Cabin and 
Lake Toochi I killed a number of grouse 
much like the fool hen we find in the 
Cascade mountains in Washington. Then 
I found a snow white grouse near the 
lake, but much smaller than those we got 
earlier around Log Cabin. These latter 
were about the size of a pigeon. I hunted 
these, as well as the brown grouse, until 
the following April. 

Can you explain the difference in size of 
the white grouse, or ptarmigan, and what 
change takes place in the plumage, if any? 

I was over the trail many times before 
the railroad was built, indeed, when there 
was scarcely a trail, and I had to do some 



and in the Rocky mountains to New Mexi- 
co, is smaller than either the rock ptarmi- 
gan or the willow ptarmigan, 2 species 
which inhabit the greater part of Alaska 
and Northern Canada. The larger birds, 
which Mr. Ferryman mentions, undoubtedly 
belong to one or other of these species. 
During the summer all ptarmigan lose their 
white plumage, and thus become inconspicu- 
ous. 

Mr. A. H. Dunham, Chief Warden of the 
Alaskan Division of the L. A. S., sends me 
the following important contribution to the 
life history of this interesting bird : 

I have made a careful study of the 
ptarmigan and have found it one of the 



23 



24 



RECREATION. 



most interesting game birds in this country. 
In April, when the snow begins to melt, a 
change is noticed in the pure white of the 
winter plumage and brown feathers begin 
to appear about the head. During the spring 
and early summer the brown gradually 
grows, and by the ist of August a com- 
plete metamorphosis has taken place. The 
bird is then c'.ad in delicately penciled 
shades of beautiful brown, and by the ist 
of September it begins to turn white again. 
By November ist it is again entirely white, 
with the exception of its tail, and the feet 
and legs are completely covered with fine 
fur-like feathers. The bird is then ready 
for the most severe Alaskan winter and 
seems entirely impervious to the arctic 
blasts. 

It is interesting to note that the change 
from white to brown begins at the head 
and goes down and that the change from 
brown to white begins at the tail and grows 
upward. At no time when the change is 
taking place does the ptarmigan exhibit the 
rough and ragged appearance of moulting, 
which is common to most other species of 
birds. When one feather is about to fall 
from a ptarmigan another is ready to take 
its place, and the plumage presents a neat, 
dressy appearance at all times. If, when 
the bird is ready to nest in spring, the 



ground is still covered with snow the eggs 
will be found white, but eggs deposited 
after the snow disappears are of a mottled 
brown color. Thus the scheme of protec- 
tive coloration is admirably carried out in 
nesting as well as in plumage. 

I have captured and domesticated a num- 
ber of ptarmigan. They have taken kindly 
to their new homes and have bred well in 
confinement. I brought several of these 
birds to the States alive and as far as I 
know, these are the only specimens thus far 
imported alive. 

I collected and mounted the specimens 
illustrated herewith, for the purpose of 
showing the transition from white to brown 
and from brown to white. The picture 
shows the average coloring of plumage that 
prevails nearly every month in the year. 

The ptarmigan is the. only game bird 
known that one can eat every day in the 
year without tiring of it. Perhaps the 
vigorous appetite developed by the strenu- 
ous Alaskan life may account for this fact. 
However, I should not wish anyone to think 
I have eaten these birds every day or that 
I would approve of such a course, for no 
one realizes more thoroughly than I the ne- 
cessity of protecting our Alaskan birds and 
animals. 

A. H. Dunham, Nome, Alaska. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY B T. BO cS. 

CAUGHT ONCE MORE. 

Winner of 22nd Prize in Recreation's 8th An- 
nual Photo Competition. 



"What is your idea of happiness?" was 
asked. 

Said the millionaire: 1 I should be happy 
if I could spend my money where it would 
be of some real benefit. This, and a good 
digestion. 

Said the poor man : Happiness is having 
enough money to spend without anxiety. 

Said the society woman : Happiness is 
rest. 

Said the washwoman : To be able to 
dance all night, and lie abed as long as I 
wanted to the next morning. 

Said the soldier : To live peaceably all 
the rest of my life. 

The sailor: To feel the solid earth un- 
der my feet for the rest of my days. 

The artist : To paint a picture to please 
myself, and not the public. 

The author : To have time enough to 
think. 

The diplomat : To be myself. 

The journalist : To tell the truth. 

The wise man : To be a fool. 

The fool : To be a wise man. 

—Life. 



A CANADIAN TROUTING TRIP. 



B. KELLY. 



The brook trout in the aquarium at Bat- 
tery park did it. , 

As I watched them lazily flashing to and 
fro, their pink spots but faintly showing in 
the uncertain light, my spirit floated miles 
and miles away to a pool that lay, calm and 
serene, in the heart of the Northumberland 
hills ; a pool whose clear waters were fed 
by a rollicking stream brawling through 
miles of green meadows, tangled thickets of 
birch and cedar and somber clusters of pine 
and hemlock. 

I felt sorry for the imprisoned trout that 
afternoon in early May. They had an un- 
healthy look; the backs and sides of some 
were scarred and bruised by rough hand- 
ling and transferring. I wondered if they 
were thinking, as I was, of a cool stream, 
now rippling over flat, smooth stones, now 
plunging down a miniature precipice, then 
rushing madly through tortuous windings 
where green alders kissed the foam-flecked 
water. 

The occupants of the other tanks in 
the aquarium received scant attention from 
me that afternoon. The muskalonge star- 
ing with meaningless eyes through the glass, 
the slimy, motionless catfish, the brilliant 
tribe from Bermuda waters, the sportive, 
water-spouting seal ; all were passed with a 
hasty glance, for the woods and streams 
were calling me and I would fain be with 
them. 

The trees in the park were clad in bril- 
liant green, the waters sparkled in the 
sunlight, while overhead the skies were 
hung with clouds that looked like the 
fleecy drapery of a bride ; but Broadway 
was pulsing with fretful life. Street hawk- 
ers cried their wares with raucous voices, 
trolley cars passed with clanging bells, and 
overhead the elevated trains rumbled in- 
cessantly. Dirt, dust and disorder were 
everywhere this spring afternoon. On 
other days I saw but the usual accompani- 
ment of a busy street in a great city. 

The brook trout did it. 

The evening of the next day found me at 
the station of a small town in Canada, and 
15 minutes after my arrival I was shaking 
hands with Adolphe, the worthy host of the 
Royal and my erstwhile trusty hunting com- 
panion. On Adolphe's head the seasons of 
nearly 60 years rested lightly. He saw my 
rod in its covering, the bulge of a fly-book 
in my pocket, then, looking into my eager 
face, he understood it all. "I got t'ree 
dozen beauties yesterday," he said, "an' the 
biggest she weigh one, 2 poun'." 

After a hearty meal we lighted our pipes, 



and throwing our fishing gear into a wait- 
ing buckboard, started for the pond, with a 
small tent firmly strapped to the back of the 
vehicle. 

Night was falling, but soon a full moon 
rolled above the horizon, flooding the land- 
scape with light and bringing into bold re- 
lief the objects around us. Bars rattled as 
the cows were driven into pastures, ankle 
deep in luxuriant grass. Lights were gleam- 
ing in farmhouses by the roadside, where 
weary laborers were resting after a long 
day in the fields. A tired looking man 
stood on a high stand by the side of a farm 
gate, one hand holding a milk pail, the 
other the uplifted cover of a tall, shining 
can. He looked after us wistfully, seeing 
our rods and baskets in the rig. 

Presently we labored up a steep hill, on 
the other side of which lay the pond. 
The moon, well up in the heavens, 
shone on its polished surface so that 
it resembled a gigantic mirror lying be- 
tween the hills. Its edges were bordered 
with white birch and cedar, and by listening 
we could hear the water falling over the 
edge of the dam. There was a sweet, lus- 
cious smell of something undefinable in the 
air. The earth seemed teeming with fresh- 
ness. The home of my boyhood had been 
a few miles from here, and I knew that in 
a circle, the extreme edge of which in any 
direction was not more than 5 miles from 
the hill on which we stood, there nestled 
7 such ponds. The sides of the hills and 
the bottoms of the valleys were wet and 
sappy with live springs. One could feel 
their delicious coolness from afar. It was 
literally the home of the brook trout. Many 
a time, when a small boy, I had trudged 
wearily homeward beneath the weight of a 
mighty string of royal trout from these 
ponds. 

Meanwhile, we descended the other side 
of the hill, let down a snake fence, or a por- 
tion of it, and drove through a pasture 
field ; then, driving the length of a shady 
lane we penetrated a fringe of cedars and 
drew up at the grass bordered edge of the 
pool. 

In a few minutes the horse was tied to a 
tree, the tent in position, a brisk fire 
sparkling in front of it, and, over the fire, 
a spluttering pan of bacon, whose appetizing 
odor, aided by the spicy, aromatic fra- 
grance of the evergreens, made us raven- 
ously hungry. 

Have you ever fished for trout by moon- 
light when the shadows of logs and bushes 
make deep, trouty looking holes, so that 



25 



26 



RECREATION. 



your heart fairly teeters with anticipation ; 
and when, your nerves all thrilling, you 
threw your line well out and let the feath- 
ery bait kiss the water were you rewarded 
by a lunging rise that started the blood 
mantling to your forehead? 

I have. I fished that night with my 
friend Adolphe, and when midnight stole on 
us we were fain to ease our shoulders of the 
weighty baskets, for behold, they were al- 
most full. 

There is a fascination about moonlight 
fishing that almost dulls the lustre of day- 
light sport. You get your pipe well started, 
you pull on your waders and step into the 
pool. The water ripples away from your 
feet in a thousand sparkles of light. The 
moon's image is distorted, and the ripples 
are carried on until they lap the great 
moss-covered log that stretches half way 
across the pool. 

We fished with worms that night, as I had 
found by experience that the trout in this 
locality rarely rose to the fly after nightfall. 
I baited a small hook with an angle 
worm, and, throwing it well out, let it sink 
slowly to the bottom. Instantly there was 
a quick, saucy tug ; not the wavering, un- 
mistakable yank of the nerch, the surging 
pull of the black bass, or the dull, heavy 
strain of the pickerel ; but the soul-stirring, 
gladsome tug of the Brook trout. I knew 
just what the gentleman had done. He had 
seen the succulent morsel descending 
through the clear waters. He had dashed 
at it instantly, seized it, turned his body 
with a lightning flirt of his tail and 



dashed for home ; but before he reached 
the shelter of the big log the hook had been 
sent home and the gallant veteran was bat- 
tling for his life and freedom. Now mak- 
ing frantic endeavors to shake himself free 
from the keen barbed hook, now heavily 
surging from one side of the pool to the 
other. He struggled bravely. But gradu- 
ally I worked him toward me and soon 
had the satisfaction of seeing him within 
arms' length, his silvery contour show- 
ing plainly in the bright moonlight, and 
each drop of water scattered by his 
threshing movements reflecting the yellow 
rays in a thousand sparkles of light. A 
final swoop of the net, and he was mine. 

Nor was my friend Adolphe less success- 
ful at his end of the pond. We had no 
lack of sport, and when tired of it, we hung 
our treasures in a tree, away from prowling 
mink and weasel, and lay down beside the 
glowing fire, not so much for the sake of 
warmth as for the delightful feeling of 
comfort it afforded us. It was with feel- 
ings of satisfaction we reviewed the even- 
ing's events. 

I will not dwell on the sport of the 
following day, as it was but a repetition of 
the previous evening. In all we secured 
about 4 score trout, many single ones 
weighing upward of a pound. 

It is a fair spot to me, that little pond be- 
tween the Northumberland hills, and I shall 
always turn to it as an oasis in the desert 
of my daily toil ; longing for the day when 
again I shall wet my line in its limpid 
waters. 



BRER JOHNSING'S SOLILOQUY. 



R. DAVIS. 



I don s'pose we orter grumble 

Caze we have so tough a lot, 
But t'ings could be heap sight handier 

If dey wa'n't so drefful sot; 
If de coon dat's in de swamp fiel' 

Would come up close to de aige, 
It would save us loads o' trouble, 

An' not so much time engage. 

If de fishes in de ribber 

Would des hurry up an' bite, 
We could ketch a mess lots quicker, 

An' git home befo' 'twas night ; 
If de co'n would grow 'thout plantin', 

An' no hoein' need be done, 
We'd have longer time fo' sleepin', 

Which would be most monst'ous fun. 



If de juicy watermillion 

Would grow big on de weeds, 
An' when we went to eat 'em 

Dey wa'n't never any seeds, 
What a worl' 'twould be to live in ! 

Weeds an' sich for million vines — 
Gosh ! I guess 'twould make t'ings easier 

If dey wa'n't no pesky rinds. 

But t'ings ain't built right fo' changin', 

We can't fix 'em up a mite ; 
An' if we don' go to kickin', 

Guess we'll git along all right. 
Soon we'll cross de shinin' ribber, 

Soon we'll land on t'other shore; 
Where we'll live in joy an' comfort, 

Sittin' 'round forever more. 



FISHING IN SOUTHERN WASHINGTON. 



M. F. JAMAR, JR. 



One of the most enjoyable trips I ever 
had was in company with J , an old col- 
lege chum and an ardent angler. We had 

determined to make the trip from V , 

on the North bank of the Columbia, to 
Lewis river, a distance of 40 miles on our 
wheels. 

One April morning we set out ; our blank- 
ets strapped to our handle bars, our rods 
to the frame, and our provisions to our 
backs. For a few miles the road was ex- 
cellent, but after entering the dense forest, 
with which all Southern Washington is cov- 
ered, it became quite muddy, and we could 
make only about 6 miles an hour. After 
10 miles of this hard pedaling, we again 
emerged into the open country. Here and 
there along the road we passed a log house, 
occasionally a frame one, surrounded by 
blooming apple, peach and prune trees. 

We then began the ascent of the water- 
shed between the Columbia river and Lewis 
river. The latter finally breaks through 
the range and joins the Columbia. An 
hour's hard riding took us to the sum- 
mit, and we were soon spinning across the 
bridge which spans Lewis river at Louis- 
ville. 

We followed the road up the river for a 
mile, and taking a wood road, soon found 
ourselves on the bank of the Lewis ; a 
river in name only, where we were, for 
there it was but a mountain stream. Be- 
fore fishing we ate our lunch and prepared 
everything, so that on our return at dark 
we would be in readiness for supper, and 
would not have to grope in the dark for 
wood and bedding. 

After putting on our wading togs and 
gathering a supply of periwinkles, the best 
bait for trout in early spring, we began 
fishing. With varying success we worked 
our way down stream, taking alternate 
ripples ; each succeeding in catching about 10 
trout to the ripple, varying in length from 8 
to 19 inches. We stopped 2 miles down 
stream to compare catches. I found, to my 
delight, that I had the most fish, as well 
as the largest. I had 27 ; my companion, 29. 

It was then 5 o'clock, and having as many 
fish as we cared to clean that evening, we 
decided to go a little farther down to a 
large deep pool, and have a swim. As we 
came out from our last plunge, J — sud- 
denly exclaimed : "What a whopper !" 
Turning, I got a glimpse of a silvery flash 
near a clump of overhanging bushes, a 
little down stream from where we were, 
on the other side of the pool. A big trout 
evidently lay in hiding there. It was, how- 
ever, impossible to drop a fly near the 



clump from our side of the stream. Trust- 
ing to find a ledge projecting into the water 
from the cliff on the other side, J — seized 
his pole and swam across. Cautiously feel- 
ing his way, he proceeded down stream to 
the place where the trout had risen. Luck- 
ily he found a footing when about 30 feet 
from the clump ; and, grasping a bunch of 
ferns on the side of the cliff, he made a cast. 
The bait had not yet touched the water 
when, with a bright gleam and loud splash, 
the trout jumped to meet it. Then began 
a lively battle. Holding the rod in one hand, 
and grasping the frail support with the 
other, J — was at considerable disadvan- 
tage. Had he not been provided with an 
automatic reel, the fish would have never 
been added to his catch. As it was, after 
repeated rushes it became completely 
wearied. Still keeping the line taut J — 
swam back to where I was standing, and 
landed his prize. It was one of the largest 
trout I have ever seen, measuring 23 inches. 

Returning to camp, well satisfied with 
our day's sport, we cooked some of the 
smaller fish for supper ; the larger ones we 
salted and packed in wet fern leaves. Then 
placing 2 big logs on the fire, we sought our 
blankets and fell asleep. 

On awakening the next morning we 
hastily prepared breakfast, and putting up 
a lunch, set out. We regained the road and 
followed it 5 miles, then cut through the 
woods back to the stream, intending to fish 
down the stream to camp. In a sheet of 
still water we gathered a good supply of 
periwinkles. 

The trout were fairly ravenous, 6 or 8 
'sometimes striking at the flies at the same 
time. It was a frequent occurrence to hook 
2 at one cast ; and now and then we 
would find 3, one on each hook. When we 
stopped for lunch at noon our baskets were 
nearly filled. To make room for more, We 
cleaned our catch, and found we had be- 
tween us 55 trout, from 8 to 16 inches in 
length. 

On resuming our fishing we found the 
trout were not biting so well as in the 
morning, but still we had fair luck. As 
we neared camp, my hopes for a bigger fish 
than my friend had captured began to 
dwindle. It happened, however, the last 
ripple fell to me. J — sat on the bank 
Svatching. At that point the stream was 
exceedingly swift, and it was difficult to 
get a firm footing. The channel was al- 
most choked with large boulders, between 
which the water flowed as in a mill race. 

Standing on one of the smaller rocks I 
dropped my line in the eddy formed in the 



27 



28 



RECREATION. 



lee of a large boulder. The back current 
whirled the line under the rock. At first 
I thought the line had caught, but w.as 
soon undeceived. With almost a shriek the 
line flew from the reel ; 2 bright bodies 
sprang from the water, showing I had in 
truth a full line. In that swift water even 
a small trout could pull well ; and those 2 
big ones were a team. Three times my 
spirits sank as the trout went down stream, 
taking all but a few yards of the line, and 



again rose as they tried to gain slack in up- 
stream rushes. Gradually the fierceness of 
the battle subsided ; and, wading back to the 
bank, I landed the 2 in a few minutes. As 
I think of them now, I wonder how the 
leader held them, one being 14 inches, the 
other 20. 

With well filled baskets, we returned to 
camp, gathered our outfit together and set 
out on the return trip. 



A NEW YORK FREAK. 

I enclose a photo of a deer's head with a 
set of remarkably formed, or rather de- 
formed, horns. The deer was shot by my 
guide and me November 10th, near Sevey, 
St. Lawrence county. It was evidently an 
old timer, and had either met with an acci- 
dent when the horns were soft or had been 
afflicted with some disease. 




I am a constant reader of Recreation, 
and find much of interest therein. I heart- 
ily endorse your efforts for the better pro- 
tection of the game of our land, and the 
discouragement of the game hog. 

F. B. Petrie, Oneida, N. Y. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY H. W. SQUIER. 
COON. 

Winner of 45th Prize in Recreation's 8th An- 
nual Photo Competition. 



A dozen operations 

A day was not such fun. 
The doctor didn't stop to eat,— 

He could only cut and run. 

—Life. 



" If you find yourself a-feelin' 

That you'd like to pick a fight, 
If you find you're not a-sleepin', 

An' you hardly eat a bite, 
If your head just keeps a-throbbin', 

At a mile-a-minute rate, 
You have got it ; quit your workin', 
An' begin a-diggin' bait." 

— Pawtucket Gazette. 






AMONG THE SELKIRKS AND CANADIAN ROCKIES. 



W. C. W. GIEGER. 



1 had often heard of the grandeur of the 
scenery in the Selkirks and Rockies along 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, My imagi- 
nation had painted well, but the reality is 
far better. 

From Portland, Oregon, North to Ta- 
coma and Seattle, Washington, and to Mis- 
sion Junction, British Columbia, there is 
almost continuous forest. Lumber camps 
and saw mills appear all along the line of 
railway; but their inroads in the great 
pine forests are as yet scarcely perceptible. 
In some places the logs are shot down the 
mountain side, and then again the lum- 
ber is floated down in flumes. In other 
places the great trees have been cut away 
for a small space and dragged to the mills, 
leaving the ground covered with great fal- 
len trunks that have gone down before the 
winds. More rarely there is a forest of dead 
and blackened trees. Fire often runs from 
the bottom to the top of a tree and then goes 
out, leaving the charred trunk to frown 
down for years on the new growth. 

Thick undergrowth, grass and flowers 
grow close to the track and brush the sides 
of the coaches, relieving us of the dust that 
is often so disagreeable in travel. At Hunt- 
ingdon we glided over the boundary line 
between Washington and British Columbia, 
and at Mission Junction I caught the Im- 
perial Limited for the East. 

There is but one good train each way a 
day, so it is necessary to take the sleeper. 
Canadian sleepers are differently arranged 
from our Pullmans. In the center 4 sec- 
tions, 2 on either side, are sofas which run 
lengthwise of the car and have rolls for 
pillows. At either end of these sections 
are arches coming out so as to leave the 
usual width of the aisle. This gives a 
pretty drawing room in the center of the 
coach, and when you are tired you can lie 
down to pleasant dreams. In the rear, back 
of the lavatory, is the smoking room, which 
makes a good observation compartment. 
Back of this again is the vestibuled plat- 
form where, if it is the rear car, you may 
sit and view the scenery. They sell you a 
ticket through to St. Paul, and permit you 
to stop off wherever you choose, and then 
give you the best berth available when you 
resume your journey. 

Soon the Fraser river is reached and we 
follow its winding course with great tower- 
ing mountains on either side. To the right 
and high over all is Mount Cheam, its cone 
shaped top far above timber line. Hanging 
to its sides are large snow fields that glitter 
in the sunshine, and along its flanks hang 



thick clouds, through which the peak pierces 
the line of the sky. As we advance more 
snow fields appear. The river runs through 
a narrow gorge with mountains rising from 
its edge. Often the cliffs have been cut 
away to make room for the road bed, and 
spurs of the mountains have been tunneled. 
Scarcely is one tunnel passed before an- 
other is plunged into. The canyon of the 
river grows deeper until you look far down 
on a surging, boiling cauldron of waters 
hedged in by granite walls. Down the 
mountains come torrents of water from the 
snow fields above to the river below. 

From the Fraser river the road runs up 
the canyon of the Illicilliwaet. The climb 
is hard and the river in almost continuous 
foam rolls far below, while the mountains 
rise so far above that at times you can not 
see their summits from the train. An obser- 
vation car is run just ahead of the sleeper 
through the mountains, and you get a fine 
view from it. Glacier house is 2 miles from 
the Illicilliwaet glacier at the head of the 
river. The hotel is a good one though open 
only a few months in the year. From the 
hotel there is a good view of the glacier as 
it rises from the gorge in swell after swell 
of ice. The glass brings out great crevasses 
in its surface. The railway company has 
guides who are skilled glacier and moun- 
tain climbers from Switzerland. No charge 
is made for their services, but I suppose 
everybody pays them, all the same. 

With one of them we started one morning 
for the ice fields that seemed near but 
were far away. He could speak little En- 
glish and I little German, but between the 
2 languages we managed to talk. We each 
carried an alpenstock, steel pointed at one 
end of the handle and with a double headed 
pick and adz on the other. The guide 
carried a long rope. From the foot of the 
glacier the waters were pouring out every- 
where. Great chasms and fissures extended 
far back in the ice. Into some of these it 
is possible to walk a considerable distance 
on rocks, with the water rolling around the 
feet and the ice walls rising far above. At 
the water's edge the ice is a clear, pretty 
blue, fading into white as you look up the 
walls. At the foot and sides of the gla- 
cier the moraine is piled high. 

There the guide tied the rope around his 
waist and about 10 feet down it wound me 
in, and at about the same distance further 
a New York man. We went up over the 
snow until it was too steep to tread with 
safety and the surface had grown into ice. 
The guide cut steps in the ice with his pick 



29 



30 



RECREATION. 



and by the aid of these we climbed up. It 
became steeper all the time. When we came 
to an almost perpendicular ice wall the 
guide would cut deeper steps, and, driving 
our picks into the ice above, we would pull 
ourselves up after him, step by step. At 
last the rear man was high enough, and we 
untied him on a small level place. Then 
the guide cut steps out over a narrow ledge 
of ice to a point where we looked down 
into a yawning chasm 700 feet deep to water 
rushing over the rocks at the bottom of the 
glacier. Stroke after stroke of the guide's 
adz sent splinters of the ice down over me. 
Step by step we went up the ice cliffs. Each 
one scaled brought still others into view. I 
had said we would go to the top, but now 
I could not see the top ; it was in fact miles 
away. 

I recalled that it is much easier to climb 
a mountain than to descend from it. I 
looked down. That was fatal. I said I 
had abandoned the idea of reaching the top 
and was ready to go down. The guide 
smiled and said we would better go to the 
top of the wall on the side of which we were 
hanging. But my decision was irrevocable. 
He told me how to set the pick and how to 
go down ; to turn my face out into space 
and hanging to ' the pick to put one foot 
down into the step below and then bring 
the other foot down and so on. Never was 
first step harder. When a gust of wind 
came I had to strain every muscle to re- 
tain my balance. On the level we step to 
balance ; there you must balance to step. 
To lean back against the cliff would throw 
the feet out of the step, and land you in 
some unreachable chasm. The weight of 
the body must be borne by the arms with a 
firm grasp of the pick during part of each 
step. A little experience brings some skill 
and confidence and makes glacier climbing 
almost delightful. Without accident we 
reached the rocks below with blistered hands 
and muscles that gave premonition of sore- 
ness to appear next day. 

Illicilliwaet glacier is said to cover 200 
square miles. From there the railroad runs 
up the Beaver river and then parallels Col- 
umbia river until it runs out from the Sel- 
kirk mountains into the Rockies. From the 
Columbia the railway carries us up the can- 
yon of Kicking Horse river. This is the 
wildest of all the canyons on the line. A 
heavy engine in front and an equally heavy 
one behind, pull and push us up the steep 
grade. With all their great power and ef- 
fort they are sometimes almost brought to 



a halt by the heavy train. So narrow is the 
canyon that at places its granite sides have 
been blasted away, and the rocks above 
overhang the coaches. One rail is some- 
times supported by outstanding timbers and 
the coach seems to be hanging over the 
foaming water hundreds of feet below. 
Now you look down on great pine forests 
waving in the winds ; then the walls almost 
meet and you hear the river below dashing 
over rocks and falls, with a roar that 
drowns the noise of the train. 

At the continental divide a sparkling 
stream separates right at the railway track, 
one branch flowing to the Pacific ocean, 
the other to Hudson's bay. Up on the 
mountain side at one place hangs a glacier 
with a perpendicular wall of ice 800 feet, 
thick that is slowly creeping down and 
overhangs the deep chasm below. Vast 
stretches of that region are unexplored and 
unknown. Banff, the great Canadian sum- 
mer resort in the Rockies, is surrounded 
on all sides by great jagged mountains. Hot 
sulphur springs that afford good bathing, 
lakes, rivers and waterfalls, are the chief 
attractions, The Canadian government has 
reserved a large tract there, and on part of 
it has in an enclosure of many acres, a 
herd of buffalo that are fine specimens of 
this almost extinct animal. 

You would not notice but what you were 
at an American hotel, except when you 
pay your bill. They give you an item- 
ized statement and a receipt. Most of 
the guests are Americans. The air is like 
a tonic, and you glow with pleasant excite- 
ment as you climb the mountains or plunge 
into the waters, row on the lakes or drive 
over the well graded highways. The Cana- 
dians, as far as I have met them, are a 
quiet, polite and kindly people. 

Waving adieu to the hoary headed mon- 
archs of the ranges we turn from the prov- 
ince of Alberta to look out over the wind 
swept bosom of Assiniboia, a vast level ex- 
panse, covered with a stunted growth of 
grass. With the exception of an occasional 
Indian village it is uninhabited. The noble 
red man, his squaw and the papoose come 
to the stations in considerable numbers to 
see the train in and to beg. Farther East 
you now and then see the house of a white 
man. The summer is so short and the win- 
ter so cold that even stock raising is haz- 
ardous and water is hard to get. At Portal 
the customs official goes through our lug- 
gage before we enter the land of Uncle 
Sam. 



Photographer's Assistant — Mrs. Van Per- 
kins complains that her portraits don't look 
like her. 

Photographer — -Complains, does she? She 
ought to be grateful. — Exchange. 



PEAKS AND PASSES OF COLORADO. 



H. A. CRAFTS. 



My preconceived idea of Cameron pass, 
Colorado, was that it was abrupt, steep and 
barren ; something rather awesome, like the 
Alpine pass in "Excelsior." I was sur- 
prised and delighted when I saw that, on 
the contrary, its grades are moderate al- 
most to gentleness, its length is continuous 
and its borders are heavily timbered. From 
Chambers lake, which lies at the Eastern 
terminus of the pass, to North Park, where 
the pass ends, is about 20 miles. Going 
into North Park the pass has a general 
Southwesterly trend ; yet winds between the 
wooded slopes of the Medicine Bow range 
on the North and West, and those of the 
nearer Rocky mountain range on the South 
and East, in long and graceful curves. 
There is no bareness nor desolation, save 
for a short distance up the pass from Cham- 
bers lake, where at some time a fire swept 
through the forest. There, indeed, the 
heart of the beholder is made sad at so 
great a destruction of valuable timber and 
so cruel a disfigurement to the bright face 
of Nature. Thousands of acres of once fine 
timber lands now lie almost as blackened 
and barren as they did the day following 
their devastation, so hard does Nature find 
it to renew herself after one of these fires 
has done its deadly work. It is one of the 
aims of our general government to devise 
means of restoring these denuded lands to 
their former condition of vigorous foresta- 
tion. 

All over these burnt lands stand the 
skeletons of the former noble forest trees 
that clothed them. These make excellent 
material for fuel, fencing, building, etc., and 
they are utilized for those purposes to some 
extent ; but their remoteness from industrial 
centers and the lack of railroad transpor- 
tation render them unimportant as articles 
of commerce. 

Beyond the burnt districts are the virgin 
forests, dense, dark and beautiful. They 
mount grandly aloft on either hand until 
they end at timber line. Beyond that, and 
visible from the bed of the pass, rise the 
bare mountain slopes and the crowning 
peaks of snow. The pass is traversed by a 
wagon road, in good condition for the 
greater part of its length, but with here 
and there a slough, a washout or a collec- 
tion of dead trees hurled across it by some 
snow slide. 

An interesting feature of Cameron pass 
is the divide, or the parting of the waters. 
This noisy stream, that has made music for 
us all the way up from Chambers lake, is 
Joe Wright creek. It flows Eastward and 



empties into Chambers lake, which is tribu- 
tary to the Cache la Poudre river, and this 
in turn is tributary to the South Platte 
river. At the summit of the pass, Joe 
Wright creek ends, and the Michigan creek 
begins, only the latter flows in an opposite 
direction, that is, to the Westward, down 
into North Park, there joining the waters 
of the North Platte river. All the way 
over the pass the traveler does not lose 
company of one or the other of these so- 
ciable streams. 

Occasionally we see the footprints of the 
advance guard of modern industry. To one 
side of the road, in a steep embankment, is 
a freshly dug prospect hole. At the sum- 
mit of the pass is an irrigating ditch, a 
strange anomaly; for this is at an altitude 
of 10,000 feet above tidewater and there is 
not a farm within a radius of 75 miles. 
Nevertheless, the ditch is of some general 
utility. The Cache la Poudre watershed 
being short of irrigation water, an irrigat- 
ing company concluded to take some from 
the North Platte watershed. They have 
turned a portion of the water of the Michi- 
gan back into the Joe Wright and thus 
added to the flow of that stream, also of the 
Cache la Poudre. This provides some 
extra cubic feet of water per second to 
the main irrigating canal down on the 
plains. 

At least twice in our journey over the 
pass our way was obstructed by fallen trees. 
These are so large, and it is so evident they 
were all smitten by the same blow, that 
the traveler intuitively glances to one side 
to see whence such a gigantic force could 
have originated. He is surprised if not awe- 
stricken to behold a vast opening through 
the forest above, to the upper limit of tim- 
ber line, and a view opened to the summit 
of the range. This is the effect of a snow- 
slide. A vast body of snow, having accu- 
mulated in some gulch above timber line, 
and having become dislodged, started down- 
ward, gathering force and momentum at 
each foot traversed, until it became irresist- 
ible and swept down through the mighty 
forest, cutting a swath like the scythe of 
some Titanic mower. Imagine the terrible 
onward rush of such a destroyer; the crash, 
the groan, the thunder of the avalanche ! 

One day we made an excursion to Finger, 
or Sawtooth, mountain, Lake Agnes and 
Mount Richthoven, 8 miles from Camp 
Zimmerman. The point of destination was 
the summit of Richthoven, one of the high- 
est peaks in Colorado, supposed to be at 
least 15,000 feet above sea level. We 



3 1 



32 



RECREATION. 



climbed within 1,000 feet of the summit, 
when we were overtaken by a storm and 
had to return ; yet the memory of that climb 
is like a page from the Walpurgis Night. 

We went on horseback. Three miles of 
the journey were through thick timber, up 
a steep mountain trail. Beyond that are 
3 miles which can not be traversed by even 
the surest footed saddle .horse, but must be 
taken on foot, with an ascent in the mean- 
time of a sheer 5,000 feet. The scene 
is wild, terrible, beautiful ! What dizzy 
heights, what awful precipices ! We look 
aloft and sicken at the thought of defying 
their terrors. How cruel, how merciless if 
once they should get us at a disadvantage ! 
Inch by inch, step by step, we pressed on- 
• yard and upward, though physically ex- 
hausted. After every few steps we were 
compelled to stop, panting, almost gasping, 
for breath. The exertion of ascent is 
enough ; but the rarity of the atmosphere 
makes it doubly difficult. Somehow we 
overcame our weakness. We measured each 
footstep and planted one foot beyond the 
other with studied care and deliberation. 
When we reached a convenient rock we 



sat down a few moments. Heavens ! How 
the heart throbs and the lungs labor ! Can 
physical frailty endure it? Possibly, if it is 
not below the average. Then the heart 
might stop ! 

We looked back over the trail below. 
Not so steep, after all ; but then, upward ! 
Ah, those cold, merciless steeps ; black and 
gray, reeking with moisture, the clinging 
mists and melting snows ! 

For an hour we climbed over craggy beds 
of broken rocks and prehistoric snow, to 
the saddle. A storm descended on us and 
the wind blew a gale, spitting rain, hail and 
snow. Strangely enough, at that stupen- 
dous height we come across a prospect hole. 
The prospector had not been long gone, for 
in the bottom of the hole were his pick and 
shovel. The wind was pitiless, and all 5 
of us got down into the prospect hole for 
shelter. The storm did not abate, and with 
the wind blowing 60 miles an hour it was 
not safe to continue the ascent. So we re- 
luctantly retraced our steps and after an 
hour of careful work arrived safe at the 
foot of the mountain and found our horses 
anxiously awaiting us. 



A LARGE ADDITION TO THE PEN. 

Here is a reproduction of a photograph of this picture don't look like train rob- 
that comes to me bearing the following bers, then I am no judge of mugs, 
legend : The dog shown in the lower left corner 

"Caught by Mr. and Mrs. Burmeister of the picture evidently had more sense ot 




and daughter, Guy Burnside, William Ar- 
thur and Russel Klein. Five hours of sport 
on Spirit lake among the pike and silver 
bass. June 5, 1903. Spirit Lake, la." 

If the 2 men on the right and the left 



decency than any of the men, for he hung 
his head so low that the lens cut it off. 

Burmeister's number in the fish hog book 
is 1,015 ! Burnside's is 1,016, Arthur Klein's 
is 1 1,017, an d Russel Klein's is 1,018. — 
Editor. 



THE OTTER'S HIGHWAY. 

M. S. H. 



From boyhood the trapping of fur bearing 
animals had an indescribable charm for me. 
The hunting for signs, the careful setting of 
iraps, and the pleasant anticipations, not 
always realized, when going over the line, 
make it one of the most fascinating of out- 
door pursuits. It also brings one in close 
communion with nature and is a constant 
challenge to skill, caution and the practical 
knowledge of the wild creatures. 

More than 20 years ago, late in Oc- 
tober, I secured a boarding place among the 
foothills of the White mountains. It was a 
good place for trapping. Several ponds, 
with connecting streams and feeders, and 
one medium sized lake gave promise that 
mink and coon could be found. During the 
several weeks of my stay, I did not meet a 
trapper; and a few rotting deadfalls were 
the only signs of the mink and coon hunter. 
At that time my opportunities for trapping 
had been limited, and my knowledge of the 
art was correspondingly slight. I had read 
with avidity everything pertaining to it, in- 
cluding one or 2 "Trappers' Guides." Could 
I have had the information found in the 
articles written by J. A. Newton and pub- 
lished in Recreation, my catch would have 
been much larger. 

Having plenty of Newhouse traps Nos. 

1 and \%, I commenced the campaign with 
much enthusiasm, setting some of the traps 
in places that a more experienced trapper 
would not have looked at. I wished to 
trap foxes, and I tried the simple method 
of setting traps in paths made by cattle in 
the mountain pastures. Finding a place 
where a root grew across the path, I placed 
a weather beaten chunk of wood a short 
distance from the root, set the trap between 
the 2 and covered it with leaves. I caught 

2 foxes by this simple plan. If rain or 
snow came after setting the trap, to destroy 
the human scent, the chances were much 
more favorable. The deadly water set I 
knew nothing about. 

Nearly all the fur was caught without 
bait. The traps were set in the little feed- 
ers which ran into the streams or ponds. 
One trap was set in a stream connecting a 
swamp with a lake. The first time I went 
to the place I found a large raccoon in the 
trap, dead and partly eaten. The coon was 
caught by its hind foot, leaving fore legs 
and head free, giving him a good fighting 
chance. I_ could only conjecture that a 
Canada lynx had probably killed him. 

One day I started on an exploring trip, 
looking for signs of coon and mink. I 
skirted one pond and followed up the 
stream running into it until I came to a 



small pond far up among the hills. Just 
above that pond, I found a small meadow. 
The wild grass grew thick and tall. A 
well defined, much used path ran through 
the meadow in the direction of a wooded 
knoll at the upper end. Supposing that 
the trail was made and used by coons trav- 
eling from the pond to the woods beyond, 
I set in the path a No. 1^2 trap, driving a 
stout piece of wood through the ring in the 
chain for a clog. The next day a severe 
rain storm set in, lasting several days. 

As soon as the storm was over I followed 
the same route, finding one coon in a trap 
set on the shore of the lower pond. When 
I came 'in sight of the meadow I found it 
covered with water to the depth of a foe 
or more. Skirting the edges of the 
meadow, I was passing a thick clump of 
bushes, when an angry snarl and the rattle 
of the chain showed my catch to be a splen- 
did male otter. Its beautiful coat shone in 
the sun as it tugged at the entangled clog. 

I was surprised and delighted. Making 
a thorough examination of the surround- 
ings, I found a trail leading from the pond 
below the meadow, faint compared with 
that through the tall, wild grasses where the 
trap was set, but easily seen. At the upper 
end of the meadow, up the wooded knoll, 

1 followed the trail, over the crest of the 
hill, and on the farther side I found a deep, 
dark spring, the head waters of a stream 
running North. This stream flowed into a 
large pond and thence into the Saco river. 
Two trees standing close together on the 
brink of the spring were worn smooth by 
the otters' passing through them to the 
spring, while the pile of droppings, glisten- 
ing with fish scales, showed that this was 
a much used resting place. Looking the 
evidence over, I came to the conclusion 
that trapping otter was easy, so I dug up the 
pine needles between the 2 trees and there 
set the trap. I even neglected the precau- 
tion of sprinkling the ground, to destroy as 
much as possible the human scent. Per- 
haps it is needless to say" that I did not 
catch another otter. If I had set my trap 
in the brook my chances would have been 
much better. 

The trapping of the otter caused much 
talk among the farmers in the vicinity; 
more than the capture of a bear, for they 
were trapped occasionally, while I could not 
hear that an otter had been seen or caught 
in that locality for many years. 

My catch that fall was 3 minks, 3 coons, 

2 foxes and the otter. I also caught some 
muskrats ; have forgotten how many. The 
distance from the pond below the meadow 



33 



34 



RECREATION. 



to the spring was not more than 200 yards, 
the only land the otter had to travel for 
many miles. Following the stream from 
the spring through the pond and a small 
river, they could reach the Saco, going 
down that river to the ocean. Returning, 
they could come up the Saco to the Ossipee 
river, and follow by lake, pond and stream 
to the meadow. Thus passed their busy 
life until the hunter's bullet or the relent- 
less trap closed it forever. 



The lake on whose shore I caught the big 
coon has changed. Summer cottages dot 
its cove-indented shores, while the summer 
hotel is much in evidence and the naphtha 
launch glides over its placid waters, scaring 
the wild ducks, on a brief visit to their for- 
mer nesting place. The meadow remains 
as when I saw it, the wild grasses undis- 
turbed by the scythe of the farmer and the 
otters' highway clear and distinct from the 
pond to the spring. 



HUNTING FOR HONEY. 



C. JURGENSON. 



Some years ago I spent my vacation on 
'my farm in the foot hills of the Santa 
Cruz mountains and as the locality is ideal 
for hunting and fishing, I invited a brother 
sportsman to visit me. One day old man 
Smith, a neighbor, and a party of boys who 
were camping on his place, invited us to 
help them cut a bee tree. Armed with a 
saw, an ax and a rawhide lasso we set out, 
Smith being the leader of the party, as 
he claimed to have cut hundreds of bee 
trees without having been stung. 

When we reached the tree we found the 
bees were in a limb about 60 feet from 
the ground. The diameter of the tree was 
such that climbing was impossible, so I 
volunteered to be hoisted by the lasso. 
This was promptly done, sailor fashion, 
feet first sometimes, until I landed safe on 
a limb 40 feet from the ground. I then 
discarded my shoes and left them stand- 
ing on a limb, as climbing was easier with- 
out them. I found I needed some one to 
help me cut off the limb. The city boys 
would not allow themselves to be hoisted 
so my friend Percy volunteered to go up. 

The lasso was then used for hoisting 
the tools and one end was tied around a 
limb as a kino of fire escape. The limb 
was soon cut nearly off when Major Smith 
suggvsteo tying one end of the lasso around 
the limb so he and the boys on the ground 
could lower the limb gently in order not 
to mash the honey. I did not think the 
lasso was strong enough, but Smith was 
confident it was, so I did as he directed. 

No sooner was the limb cut than the 
lasso snapped like a piece of cotton twine. 
One end flew back and struck me in the 
face almost knocking me out of the tree. 
I had hardly recovered from the shock 
W-hen I saw about a million bees coming 



back to where I was sitting. In about 2 
minutes they made it so hot for me I com- 
menced to look for the lasso, but it was 
not there. I yelled to the boys below to 
throw the lasso up to me. but the boys 
were gone. I could just see Major Smith's 
coat tail disappearing in the brush. I 
begged and yelled for someone to come 
back and throw the lasso, but a 4-horse 
team could not have pulled the bravest of 
them back. 

Then I saw Percy lying on a limb a few 
feet below me with his face covered by 
his arms and about a thousand bees taking 
turns in making life miserable for him. 
Something desperate had to be done. I 
could not endure the situation any longer 
so I ran out on the tip of the limb Percy 
laid on, took one deep breath and jumped 
into space. 1 landed in the top of a small 
oak below and fortunately caught a limb. 
From there I soon reached the ground. 
Percy at once followed my example and 
was equally successful. 

I then made for the brush where the 
other boys were hiding. There I had my 
revenge. Smith's dog went to the tree 
and the bees took after him. He gave one 
howl and ran to his master for protection. 
The bees promptly followed the dog and 
on discovering his master's hiding place 
they gaily attacked him also. Smith dashed 
through the brush, hitting first his left 
ear, then his right, cursing the dog at every 
jump and coaxing him to stay away; but 
the dog stayed with him and the bees with 
both of them. 

My shoes were still in the tree, but I did 
not care to call on the bees again. As I 
had no oiher way to get the shoes down 
I left them, for the bees to take revenge on, 
and plodded home without them, wiser but 
in no good humor. 



LITTLE THINGS IN NATURE. 



ARTHUR PHELPS. 



Men write about hunts they have had 
after moose, and how they nearly got killed 
while after a bear, and all that sort of thing, 
which makes good stories for the man who 
can get to the wild woods and can under- 
stand what is talked about. The town man 
reads those stories and is envious of the 
other man, wishing that he, too, could see 
and study nature. He can, in his own 
home. Of course, it will only be the little 
things in nature, but they are as interest- 
ing as the big things. The little things 
easiest to study at this time of the year are 
the birds. A man can get many hours of 
recreation and pleasure watching them. 

To hear a bird in winter always makes 
me want to stop and hunt up the little sing- 
er. I want to get a closer acquaintance, 
and it always repays me even when I have 
to walk through 2 feet of snow. The chick- 
adees are the most interesting little neigh- 
bors we have. Of course, they don't exact- 
ly sing, but their pleasant "stic-a-dee-dee" 
can be heard in almost any locality, and at 
almost any time of the day. 

The first one I saw last winter came and 
feasted off a meaty bone I had nailed up in 
our back yard. He preferred to pull a piece 
of meat off the bone and fly with it to an 
overhanging branch. There he would place 
one foot on the bone and while balancing 
himself with the other would pick the meat 
to pieces. I don't know why he chose this 
manner of eating. Perhaps it was because 
he was afraid of the downy woodpecker 
that had been there before him. The chic- 
a-dee flew away before I had seen nearly 
enough of him, and he had given me so 
much pleasure in watching him that I re- 
solved to keep my eyes open in the future. 

The next afternoon when I took my walk 
I was on the lookout, and because I kept 
my ears open I heard a chickadee call from 
some trees at the end of a small lane. I 
crept up to see what was going on. There 
were 2 birds, one in each tree, and from all 
appearances they seemed to be carrying on 
a conversation. They kept calling to one 
another in turn with variations at the end 
of the call. When one of them was about 
to give a call I made a step forward and 
was seen. Both birds flew at once, seem- 
ing to see me at the same time. I hadn't 
learned anything much about them except 
to take more particular note of their plum- 
age, but it pleased me to know that I had 
little winter neighbors so close. I could 



get a new pleasure from my walks, and 
their only purpose would no longer be for 
exercise. 

The other day when some odds and ends 
were thrown out I had a chance to see the 
chickadee at his best. Among other things 
thrown out were 2 or 3 small pieces of 
meat. Almost as soon as they touched the 
ground a chickadee flew down from some- 
where and began picking about. He either 
was not hungry just then and was going 
to cache his food, or he was not going to 
let me see him eat it, for he selected the 
smallest of the pieces of meat and tried to 
fly away with it. It was too heavy for him, 
however, and he dropped it. Then he 
hopped away from it a few inches and 
cocked his head on one side- and looked at 
it. He looked so much like a man esti- 
mating with his eye the weight of anything, 
that I laughed and frightened him away; 
but in a few minutes he was back again. 
After a few more unsuccessful attempts to 
carry the meat off he evidently decided that 
the best way was to eat what he could not 
carry and cache the rest. 

The chickadee has many calls and notes 
besides the one after which he is named. 
When running up and down a limb looking 
for grubs or other food, he gives a peculiar 
little whistle or series of whistles with a 
soft undertone. I think this is his most 
pleasing note, and well worth hearing. I 
only mention this one note out of perhaps 
a dozen I have heard him utter. I leave 
the rest for the man who wants to study 
the little things to find out for himself. 

The chickadee is not by any means the 
only outdoor friend we have in the winter. 
I have chosen him for this sketch simply 
because I think he is the most interesting 
of our winter birds. Among some of the 
other birds one may see and study in the 
winter are the English sparrow, who is in- 
teresting, for all that is said against him; 
the downy woodpecker, and the nuthatches, 
both white and red breasted. The red 
breasted is the rarer and smaller of the 2. 
I watched one yesterday while feeding. He 
slipped his long, pointed bill under a piece 
of bark and, running it along underneath 
for about an inch, gave it a twist and off 
came the bark, leaving his food exposed. 

Watch the birds, make the acquaintance 
of each, and you will get more pleasure out 
of your walks than you ever before thought 
they possessed. 



35 



CRUELTY TO COUNTRY NEIGHBORS. 



MRS. H. P. PIPER. 



I live on the outskirts of a small town, 
and many of the farms adjoining have 
patches of woodland The wild creatures 
that live in the woods make their way into 
our gardens and shrubbery and are greeted 
by us according to our character. Some of 
us greet them with dog and gun. 

One rainy Sunday I saw a large fox 
squirrel in the shade trees in front of the 
house. He was a most beautiful creature ! 
His grace and agility made the dull day 
seem bright, and were quite as refreshing 
as a sermon. For several summers in suc- 
cession a white robin slept in a shrub near 
the walk. 

Last autumn an owl came at dusk, to 
watch me cover my flower beds from frost. 
He sat on the low branches overhead and 
he moved about the grounds with me as if 
superintending the work, turning his head 
to inspect it before following to another 
part of the garden. 

The block in front of us has dense shrub- 
bery, and. one day I saw on the fence across 
the street a covey of quails. The man liv- 
ing there keeps a bird dog and he was after 
the beautiful creatures. The birds crossed 
the street and came into our lot, hiding in 
the rose hedge at the foot of the lawn. I 
went into the street and walked over the 
dainty trail they had left in the dust. The 
dog could not find the scent for several 
days, but one day I saw him and his owner 
on the next lot to ours, hunting for the lost 
trail. I went out and stopped the hunt. 
The next day I saw the birds in the garden, 
making themselves quite at home. There 
were 17 of them. Three seemed full grown 
and the rest younger. I was careful not to 
disturb them. One day I was working at 
my window and hearing soft sounds of rust- 
ling and whispering, I was delighted to see, 



in a pear tree in front of the window, a 
row of beautiful brown birds craning their 
necks to see me work. They pushed and 
hustled one another along the branch until 
14 little heads in a row all turned bright 
eyes to peer through the screen at me. I 
do not think I ever felt prouder of an au- 
dience in my life. Unfortunately, the man 
across the street had a gun as well as a 
dog. One day when I was away from 
home he came with both dog and gun. 
When I returned at night only a few feath- 
ers and a drop or 2 of blood remained of 
my beautiful, trusting visitors. Not a nice 
act for a neighbor ! I felt almost as if he 
had murdered a child of mine. 

There are corn and wheat fields near us, 
and I hear the emails calling "Bob White." 
Once I whistled in reply to them and en- 
ticed a large flock into my garden. The 
same man with the gun heard me whistle, 
followed the little visitors a mile and came 
back with 5 of them hanging by their slen- 
der legs. I felt like a guilty accomplice 
that time. I had allured the dear little 
things to their death ! Now I hear the 
quails whistle their call, but do not answer 
it. "Bob White" brings a constriction of the 
heart. I remember the little slaughtered 
ones I saw in that man's hand. I said 
something of what I felt when he stopped I 
to show me his spoils, but his reply was, 

"If I had not got them someone else 
would. They are made to be shot." 

How do we know they were made to 
be shot? Perhaps they are intended to 
make the fields more joyful ; perhaps more 
fruitful. I have not invited any more wood- 
land visitors to come and be murdered. If 
Mr. Man with the gun wants game he may 
tramp the fields and woods for it; I shall 
not lure it within his reach. 



NIGHTFALL. 



A. N. KILLGORE. 



The sun is sinking down the Western sky. 
Dim shadows lengthen o'er the trembling 

rill. 
The night-bird 'gins to voice his mournful 

cry 
And quiet rests the wheel of yonder mill. 

O'er distant field of yellow plumed grain 
The crow flaps heavily with discordant 

sound; 
While cattle amble down the dusty lane, 
Past lonely, marble covered burial ground. 



And now, the W^est takes on a rosy hue, 
The cricket loudly chirps his noisy tune, 
Pale stars begin to sparkle in the blue 
Like diamond settings for the crescent 
moon. 

The sun has sunk behind yon purple hill, 
Beacon lights are gleaming from the town; 
Save for the evening wind, all else is still 
And night has drawn her sable curtain 
down. 



36 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



A PLETHORA OF MOUNTAIN SHEEP. 



A. T. BICKFORD. 



At the Southern extremity of Lake Okan- 
agan, B. G, reached by the Canadian Pa- 
cific railway, from the junction at Sica- 
mous, on the main line, is a country 
studded with hills towering 1,500 to 2,000 
feet above the lake. The steep slopes of 
these hills are covered with patches of rich 
bunch grass, and with thyme, affording ex- 
cellent pasturage to numerous bands of 
mountain sheep, which are indigenous to 
that part of the world. During the summer 
the sheep seek the seclusion of the higher 
mountain ranges to the Southwest, where 
the ewes can raise their lambs without be- 
ing molested, as few hunters ever attempt 
to invade their summer solitudes. About 
the middle of October the sheep begin to 
make their appearance on the lower hills, 
gradually increasing in numbers until deep 
snow drives them all down. 

After several days of severe frost, about 
the middle of November, my partner and 
I loaded our pack horses and set o"ut for 
the haunts of the sheep to secure some good 
heads for mounting. Arriving at our in- 
tended hunting ground, we were disa- 
greeably surprised to find 2 parties on the 
field. Camping there for the night, we 
learned from our neighbors that they had 
seen plenty of sheep on the adjacent hills, 
and about 8 p. m. one of their party gave 
color to the statement by bringing in a 
head with a 15-inch horn, base measure- 
ment. The next morning we moved far- 
ther up the hill to undisturbed country, and 
made preparations for a permanent camp in 
a sheltered spot among some pines. 

On a fine frosty morning we commenced 
our hunt and barely half a mile from 
camp we came in view of a bunch of 9 
sheep, standing among some scattered 
pines only 40 yards from where we stood. 
Having a good look at the sheep, we con- 
cluded that there were no suitable heads 
among them for our purpose, so we pro- 
ceeded farther up the hill, and reached a 
position which afforded a view of a large 
extent of the hillside on either hand. 

By the aid of our 8 power Lomb-Zeiss 
binoculars we saw a large ram feeding on 
a hill a mile or more distant. We decided 
to stalk this animal, and in order to ap- 
proach we took advantage of some pine 
' scrub running up a hogback, somewhat be- 
yond, and above our game. Among the 
timbers we came on 2 ewes which ran 
down hill into a bunch of about 30 more, 



in the center of which we recognized our 
ram. A general stampede followed and 
the big ram became hopelessly mixed with 
the rest, making it impossible to get a shot. 
We tried to head off the sheep but failed. 
By that time we began to feel like eating 
our lunch, and watched, while we ate, the 
movements of 2 ewes, which were slowly 
approaching our position. When about 200 
yards from our hiding place the ewes were 
joined by a good sized ram, which also 
allowed his curiosity to lead him to investi- 
gate us ; but it cost him dearly. When he 
was within 100 yards he was met by a 50- 
110 bullet from my companion's rifle, which 
brought the ram down. The ewes, be- 
wildered by the noise, ran within 10 yards 
of us, giving us-an excellent chance to ob- 
serve them at close quarters. 

We took the head of our ram and start- 
ed along the hillside toward camp. On 
rounding a rock bluff we saw another ram 
coming up a draw, or ravine, toward where 
we stood. We took some running shots 
and wounded our game, which turned and 
ran down hill. I left my partner to look 
after the head and hastened down after the 
ram, keeping him in sight for about half 
a mile, when he disappeared among some 
rocks. At it was late, I rejoined my com- 
panion, who in my absence, had located 
another bunch of 10 sheep. 

We did not turn aside after them, but 
proceeded toward camp. However, our 
day's sport was not over, for when some 
distance from camp we saw a large ram and 
3 ewes slightly below us, about 300 yards 
distant, which offered too tempting a 
chance to resist. Taking a careful sight on 
the ram with my 30-40 I fired, and broke 
one of the ram's front legs, sending 
him in the same direction as the for- 
mer ram. Again leaving my partner I 
gave chase and followed the wounded ani- 
mal into some rocky ground, startling 2 
ewes, "which were in hiding there. The 
ram went straight down hill toward camp. 
Following him about 300 yards farther, I 
got a good broadside shot at him as he 
stood 40 yards away behind a bunch of 
scrub, and he fell, shot through the heart. 

It was almost dark, so leaving the car- 
cass, I made for camp, crossing fresh sheep 
tracks and seeing shadowy forms vanishing 
into the gloom. My partner and I reached 
camp thoroughly tired, and well satisfied 
with our unusually good day's sport. The 
next morning we were lucky enough to 
kill the other wounded ram, and we put 
in the rest of the day securing our heads. 



37 



38 



RECREATION. 



These 3 heads measured 14 to 15 inches 
around the base of the horns and now 
hang on the walls of our home. 



YOUNG-MAN-AFRAID-OF-THE- WOODS. 

One afternoon I started with a boy about 
13 years old, whom I will call George, for 
a small lake 8 miles from Lake George, 
N. . Y. George told me he had often 
camped out over night. After going 
about 3 miles George wanted to rest, 
so we stopped, and ate some apples. 
We soon started again, however, and did 
not stop until we reached the top of the 
mountain. Then we had trouble in finding 
a road that went in the right direction. 
Not being able to find one we started 
through the woods, but soon had to stop 
and rest because George was tired again. 
I finally left him and my gun and walked 
alone to find a road. Presently I heard 
him call and I could tell from his tone 
that he was frightened, so I went back to 
him. I found him crying. He said he was 
sick and wanted to go home, but it was 
then 7 o'clock and nearly dark. I told 
him it would be impossible to go home 
that night and that we might better build 
a shelter and stay over night. After a 
while he became quiet and helped me build 
a small hut. We then ate our supper and 
went to bed, as we expected to be up at 
daybreak to start for the pond, in order to 
fish early in the morning, when the black 
bass bite, and the flies don't. 

We had not been asleep long when 
George wakened me, saying something was 
trying to break in -and he wanted me to 
shoot it quick. He was much frightened, 
but I convinced him the noise was made 
by a wood rabbit, not a bear. He evidently 
did not go to sleep for he woke me again 
and said there was something terrible in a 
tree near. It proved to be a large screech 
owl. This frightened him so he could 
hardly speak. 

By that time it had grown cold, so I 
suggested that we go outside and build 
■ a fire. George was afraid to do that. I 
told him to stay inside and I would go 
out, but he did not want me to leave him. 
At last he came out and as there was no 
moon it was very dark. I had him stay by 
the camp while I found some wood and 
made a fire. I was almost frozen stiff and 
so was he. Every time there was a sound 
near us he would be frightened to death 
and want me to shoot off my gun to scare 
the animal away. 

After a long night, day began to break 
and we started home instead of for the 
lake. I decided I shall never again take 
a boy out to stay over night. 

Ralph S. Willis, Brooklyn. 



SOUND LOGIC ON GAME PROTECTION. 

Hon. W. B. Mershon, a prominent Michi- 
gan sportsman, writing to a friend in an- 
other part of that state, says : 

I am glad to learn of the interest ta- 
ken in your locality in game protection. 
Every migratory game bird should be pro- 
tected from the time it leaves the South on 
its way to its breeding ground. It is all 
right to have a reasonable season in the 
fall in which to shoot game birds, but the 
number killed should be limited and the 
time in which they may be killed should 
be made sufficiently short so that the sup- 
ply would be maintained. In short, no 
more should be killed than can be repro- 
duced each year. I am decidedly opposed 
to spring shooting and to the late winter 
shooting allowed in the South. If shoot- 
ing is allowed all through the winter, some 
restriction as to the number that may be 
killed and the shooting should be limited 
to a certain 2 or 3 days in each week. The 
sale of game should be stopped everywhere. 

Thousands of birds are wasted by being 
served at hotels for banquets. They are' 
never properly cooked and rarely are they 
eaten, but mussed over and pushed aside. 
I attended a banquet given to about 400 
lumbermen in Washington, in March, and a 
quail was served to each guest. That 
meant about 400 birds for that one ban- 
quet and I do not believe half a dozen of 
them were eaten. There are probably 2 or 
3 banquets in Washington every night in 
the winter, so it is easy to figure out what 
an enormous quantity of game is wasted 
in this way. 

The writer of that letter should be in 
Congress. — Editor. 



THE OREGON COAST RANGE. 

The Western slope of the Coast range 
is strictly a dairy country, with a climate 
so mild that cattle can browse all winter 
on the dense underbrush. In this under- 
brush elk^ deer and bear have a safe re- 
treat from the stalking hunter, as he may 
pass within 5 yards of a deer and not know 
it. Only the keen scented dog will tell him 
there is game at hand, and after the dog 
has jumped the deer the hunter must be 
quick and sure with his rifle, as a few 
bounds will take the quarry out of sight. 
Should a wounded deer get 100 yards away 
it is lost to the hunter unless he has a well- 
trained dog. It is thus with all game from 
elk to pheasants. One rarely gets 2 good 
shots with a rifle. 

All our lakes, rivers and streams teem 
with trout. The principal rivers are the 
Coos, Coquille and Umpqua. There is no 
season of the year but what there is sport 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



39 



of some kind ; trout and salmon are always 
waiting for the hook or fly, and owing to 
the mild climate, deer are in fair condition 
all winter. In the fall pheasants and grouse 
afford unlimited shooting. This is the win- 
ter home of all sorts of water fowl. Can- 
vasbacks, mallards, sprig, teal, blue bills, 
China geese, honkers, grey geese and brant 
come in great flocks. 

J. D. Magee, Templeton, Ore. 



ANOTHER GAME PROTECTIONIST IN CON- 
GRESS. 

Congressman W. E. Humphrey, of Wash- 
ington, writes thus to a constituent about 
the bill to create a game preserve in the 
Olympic Mountains : 

I regret to say that I have little hope of 
its passage this session. However, I shall 
get it through if possible. In this bill I 
make imprisonment the only punishment. 
This is done to catch that class of men 
who are willing to pay a fine in order to 
get an elk. 

I desire to call the attention of your 
Association to another question of great 
importance in our State. Ours is one of 
the few states in which any great number of 
game birds, particularly water fowl, are to 
be found. As you know there has been re- 
cently placed on the market a new engine 
of destruction and extermination in the 
shape of an automatic shot gun. Your as- 
sociation should commence immediately a 
fight to have our next Legislature enact a 
law prohibiting the sale and use of these 
guns in our State. 

As one whose greatest enjoyment is found 
in hunting; who has carried a gun almost 
from the time he left the cradle, and who 
has hunted from Florida to Alaska, you 
can count on my assistance in any fight 
to protect our game from extermination. 



SPORT OR MEAT? 

I endorse Mr. H. S. Terrell's article en- 
titled "Sport or Meat?" in March Recrea- 
tion. I can't imagine a more barbarous 
way of killing deer, than going to their 
feeding grounds, lying in wait for them 
and shooting them down like a beef. I 
would as soon jack them, and that is the 
lowest order of hunting. I am a great 
lover of deer hunting and have killed many, 
but have never killed one standing and have 
no desire to do so. 

Our game law allows only 3 months in 
which we can hunt deer, and each hunter 
is restricted to 5 deer for the season. Since 
the passage of this act, deer are increasing 
rapidly, and if the law is enforced contin- 
uously, as it now is, we will soon have 
great hunting here. I hunt deer with 2 
trained hounds, 2 steady horses that can be 



shot from, and a congenial friend. When 
we have killed one deer we call it a day's 
sport. 

You are taking a noble stand against the 
automatic gun. I hope the manufacturers 
will see the error of their way and not 
put such a dastardly weapon on the market. 

Your magazine is a typical sportsmen's 
journal and I wish you every success. 

P. D. Parker, Oak Hill, Fla. 



GAME NOTES. 

I am but 17 years old and have witnessed 
the almost total disappearance of small 
game from this part of Michigan, yet I re- 
member when it was abundant. When 8 
years old, I was fishing one day in the mill 
race in the center of town. A large covey 
of quail flew over me and lit on nearby 
houses and barns. To-day the man who sees 
a quail in the vicinity of Albion builds a 
story on it to surprise his friends. The few 
quails, grouse and squirrels left can be 
saved only by forbidding all hunting for at 
least 5 years. The sportsmen of Battle 
Creek are buying quail to turn out, but un- 
der present conditions the birds are not 
likely to survive the first open season. 

Fred Davis, Albion, Mich. 



One morning before the last. open season 
I heard fhe report of guns and hurried to 
the scene c$ the shooting. For a while I 
could see no one, but soon there was an- 
other report and a quail fell not 20 feet 
from me. I stood in silence until the hunt- 
er emerged from the thicket to find his 
bird.. He dodged back as soon as he saw 
me, but not before I recognized him. I 
had him up before Justice O'Neal the fol- 
lowing day and he was fined $45 for 3 
quails found in his possession. I have made 
up my mind to prosecute every person who 
breaks the game law in this^ section. 

Henry Marshall, Laural, Md. 



The past winter was a hard one on game. 
From 3 to 4^2 feet of snow on the level, 
and phenomenally low temperature all the 
time. My dog found a woodcock on her 
nest yesterday, but did not hurt either bird 
or eggs. E. F. S. Jenner, Digby, N. S. 



I am a reader of your magazine and have 
been for some years. I like the way you 
get after the swine. 

O. L. Dillon, Memphis, Tenn. 



Your magazine is giving better satisfac- 
tion here than any other we have, and we 
take them all. 

Mark W. Thompson, Dover, N. H. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kingfish^-Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September. Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
shedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-fish, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel— Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Head. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs, 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait : Skinner crab. Time and tide : Day, flood. 

Blackfish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime, flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide: Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish _ August to No- 
vember. Haunts: Rivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead — June to October Haunts: Surf 
and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: Surf, all tideways. Baits: Shedder 
crabs, surf- mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. 

Blue Fish — Horse Mackerel. June to November 
1st. Haunts: Surf, open sea and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



A BITTER ROOT BULL. 
S. H. C. 

"And the biggest fish I ever caught was the 
one that got away." — From the Opera, "Miss Bob 
White." 

In the fall of 1900, while camped on the 
Bitter Root river, above Hamilton, Mont., 
I had the adventure of my life. We were 
held up there 36 hours waiting for our 
guides to finish preparations, for, as usual, 
they were not ready on time. One of my 
friends had been out the evening before and 
caught some good trout, so that morning 
T took a Bristol steel rod, an old line with 
a leader and a cast of 3 flies on it. I fished 



down stream with varying success, picking 
up a good sized trout here and there, until 
about 24 of a mile below camp I came to a 
swift riffle ending in a great black pool, in 
which was some driftwood, including sev- 
eral trees. Here was a place that should 
produce good results. I waded out into 
the current nearly up to my knees. I could 
not venture farther, so I let my flies drift 
into the silent pool. I would let them go 
as far toward the driftwood as I dared, 
then reel in. I had made 5 or 6 such casts 
and had taken 3 fair sized trout. Finally I 
fastened a good one and started to reel 
him in. In a moment another struck and 
hooked himself. I had not taken 6 feet of 
line when something hit the tail fly, and 
I thought I had fastened to a whale. It 
was then that the real circus began. I had 
3 fish on an old, worn line. Back and for- 
ward, crosswise, endwise and every other 
wise this tandem team went; but the big 
fellow was on the end and that helped me, 
the 2 smaller fish being governed mostly 
by his movements. 

The minutes flew by and still the fight 
went on. Finally I realized that the war 
was entirely between me and the big trout. 
The others were licked and had quit. My 
flies were dressed on number 7 hooks, and 
I worked carefully. My right hand and 
arm had become so weary that I could no 
longer support the rod, so abandoning the 
reel, I grasped line and rod with both hands 
and thus the fight went on. 

I had worked them to within 25 or 30 
feet of me and held the big one up on the 
riffle in the hope of drowning him. It was 
my only chance. He arose to the surface 
and his mouth was open. It looked as if 
I could stick a wooden pail in it. I could 
have shot him if I had had a pistol. 

I looked over my shoulder to see if any 
help was in sight, but no one was there. I 
dared not take any more line yet. 

Finally the climax came. The heavy 
weight and the drag of the swift water 
gradually tore the small hook out of his 
mouth, and the monster floated slowly down 
the stream. 

I reeled the 2 remaining fish in without 
opposition. One was 9 inches long and the 
other 11. One was dead, the other barely 
able to wiggle his tail. 

I wended my way sadly back to camp, 
debating with myself if I should tell the 
story. I decided to tell it, and did so, and 
as I expected, got the "merry hoot" from 
the boys ; but one of the guides said : 
"It is no fish story. I have seen bull trout 
26 inches long taken out of this river. 
That is what you had, and it takes a strong 



40 



FISH AND FISHING. 



41 



line and a big hook to bring them. They 
fight like the devil." 

I went down to the same place that even- 
ing, but it was no go. I think my bull 
friend was sitting in the back room with 
his jaw tied up, and would not answer. 



A JONAH. 
Swinging his legs from the end of one of 
the dilapidated fishing wharves of a Cape 
Cod fishing town was a tall, lanky individ- 
ual whose general appearance betokened 
practiced neglect. It was the busy season, 
and fishing smacks could be seen anchored 
at favorable points along the coast, or drag- 
ging their nets slowly before the wind. In- 
shore were a few yawls and smaller boats, 
and on the beach some old men were dig- 
ging clams. Even the children seemed more 
or less affected by the spirit of thrift, and 
were searching for crabs and mussels, or 
picking up bits of edible seaweed from 
among the coarser varieties. 

Only the lanky individual on the wharf 
was idle, and he was without even the cus- 
tomary fishing pole of the wharf lounger 
His legs dangled, and his eyes stared va- 
cantly at nothing. Now and then a fisher- 
man, or sailor, or clam digger crossed the 
wharf, apparently unconscious of his pres- 
ence. A visitor from the little hotel on the 
hill looked at him curiously, and then 
turned to an old man who was swinging 
along with a basket of clams. 

"That big fellow seems to take life easier 
.than the rest of you," the visitor said. "I've 
noticed him there 3 days in succession. Isn't 
he a little lazy?" 

"Wal, I dunno." The clam digger low- 
ered his basket and wiped the trickling rivu- 
lets of sweat from his leathery visage. "In 
fust sight it might seem so, but someway I 
never set Lem'l down as what ye might call 
lazy. He's a Jonah." 
"A what?" 

"A Jonah. Ain't ye never run acrost 
none? They bring misfortin to whatever 
they tech. Now that Lem'l was what ye 
might call a bright boy; wa'nt afeared o' 
work nor nothin', but he never seemed to 
git on. When he was old 'nough for v'yagin' 
Cap'n Knowles took him out with the fleet 
on his own boat, mind ye ! But fish stopped 
a bitin', and when they found he was a 
Jonah they put Lem'l on the Saucy Ann, 
Cap'n Barker. Then the Saucy Ann broke 
luck an' they transferred him to the Crane, 
Cap'n Bill Potter. But 'twant no sort o' 
use. Wherever Lem'l was thar wa'nt no 
fish. No matter if they'd been bitin' like all 
p'ssest when he teched deck, arter that thar 
wa'nt so much as a star fish brung on board. 
"The end on't was, a boat came back spe- 
cially to set him ashore. Since then Lem'l's 
been sort o' dwindlin'. Folks would hire 
him now an' agin for a spell, but soon's their 



luck turned, poor Lem'l had to go. Now 
he can't git a job nowhar, of nobody." 

"Why, it is sheer superstition !" cried the 
visitor indignantly. 

The old clam digger lifted his basket. 

"Mebbe, mebbe," he said laconically, "but 
thar's Lem'l on the wharf, an' thar's the 
boats tossing out yander, an' thar's the fish 
in the sea. S'pose ye hire one o' the boats 
an' Lem'l and try your luck." 

"But why doesn't he go away?" persisted 
the visitor, as he followed the old man, who 
began to swing laboriously up the street. 

The clam digger sniffed contemptuously. 

"Go 'way ! Huh ! He was borned an' 
brung up here, an' folks that's borned an' 
brung up here never go 'way. They can't." 

The visitor allowed the old man to swing 
on, but as he turned toward his hotel on the 
hill, he glanced back at the wharf. Lem'l 
was sitting in exactly the same position, his 
legs dangling above the water, and his eyes 
still staring vacantly into space. 

F. H. Sweet, Palm Beach, Fla 



OUR BOOT LAKE TRIP. 

June 29th, 1 901, Chick, Puss, Kitty and 
Porter left Chicago for a 3 weeks' trip 
among the waters near Eagle River, Wis- 
consin. June 30th we landed in Eagle 
River, and were met at the station by Ed., 
the head guide of the place. After a 10 
mile drive through the woods we arrived 
at Everetts in time for breakfast, and there 
earned the proud title of the "Hungry 
Four." 

The first week we spent fishing the lakes 
in the vicinity, and in that time we had 
enough good pike fishing to last a life- 
time. Deer were numerous and could be 
seen at almost any time down by the lake. 

Tuesday morning of the second week we 
started for Boot lake, 20 miles from Eagle 
River. We had a wagon loaded with 2 
boats, our camp equipage, fishing tackle, 
and the 2 laziest of the party, myself, Puss, 
and Chick. Porter, Kitty and the guide 
followed. Ed had promised to get us back 
by water. After traveling all morning 
through dense brush, the branches along 
the narrow trail slapping us in the face, 
we stopped for dinner in the middle of a 
dense wood. We soon resumed our jour- 
ney and at 5 o'clock we arrived within 100 
yards of Boot lake, as near as we "could 
get with the wagon. We carried boats, etc., 
from the wagon to the lake and at our first 
view of the lake saw a big buck on the 
opposite shore. 

The next morning, after a plunge in the 
lake we drew straws to see who should 
strip and seine for minnows. Porter and 
Puss, of course. I always did get the 
worst end of things ! We soon had 2 
buckets full of large suckers and shiner min- 
nows and lost no time in getting out on 



42 



RECREATION. 



the lake. Chick and I were in the large 
boat with the guide, and Porter and Kitty 
manned the smaller one. It was ideal 
mnskalonge weather, the wind being just 
right. We trolled around the lake twice, 
about 5 miles, and caught only a few pike. 
This did not look any better than Everett's, 
and Chick and I made remarks about people 
who thought they knew where the muskys 
slept. Just at that moment Chick's bait 
was struck. 

"Another blamed pickerel," he* said; but 
no. That time he was lucky, and a shining 
muskalonge flashed into the air frantically 
shaking itself to get rid of the hook. 

"Keep the line taut," Ed. and I shouted 
together. 

Chick was the youngest and least experi- 
enced member of the party and we thought 
he needed directing. He played his fish 
well, however, and after 40 minutes of 
hard fighting he landed his musky. It 
weighed 19 pounds by the pocket scales, 
and when Ed. cut the steaks from it for 
supper Chick's heart almost broke because 
musky would not keep a week, so he could 
exhibit it at the hotel. 

Chick's was the only muskalonge landed 
during our trip and Chick now claims to 
be the best angler. He had a bad case of 
swelled head which we were not able to 
cure until he fell out of the boat on the 
way back while showing off his skill as a 
canoeist. 

We certainly were up against it on our 
way back. Large trees had fallen over the 
creek, averaging one a mile, and every 
time we struck one it meant get out and 
drag. It took us nearly 2 days to reach 
Everett's, but the trip as a whole was one 
we shall never forget. 

Percy L. Trussel, Berwyn, 111. 



A LAC VIEUX DESERT MUSKALONGE. 

C. S. THOMPSON. 

In a worn tackle box of mine is a small 
notebook and on its fly leaf is this memo- 
randum : "About the last of May, or 
within the first 2 weeks of June, write 
Chris, at State Line, Wisconsin, and find 
out if the muskalonge are biting well. 
Whatever the answer is, go." For the 8th 
consecutive time I decided to follow its 
advice. 

State Line ends with the name. It is in 
Northeastern Wisconsin. The nearest fish- 
ing resort is Lac Vieux Desert, the head of 
the Wisconsin river, a large and beautiful 
body of water, with a shore line of 20 miles. 

The 7 mile drive from the station to my 
guide's cabin was an exquisite pleasure to 
me, after being cooped up in the city dur- 
ing the long winter. The trees were in the 
full bloom of spring. The trailing arbutus 
had disappeared, but in its stead were an- 
emones, glossy wintergreen, and many va- 



rieties of ferns ; and the birds sang among 
the pines and hemlocks. 

We drove slowly by a large swamp, and 
out dashed, in full view, a beautiful deer. 
It stopped, gazed intently our way, then 
disappeared. I vowed then that I would 
come again later in the year and capture 
that beautiful creature. I kept my vow, 
too! 

We arrived at the cabin long before sun- 
set, and my guide suggested a short row 
and perhaps a musky that very evening. 
This was exactly to my liking, so my rod 
was quickly put together and we embarked 
in a birch canoe. The lake was rough, but 
not enough to interfere with fishing. Pad- 
dling down the lake over many likely holes, 
we fished the spot where there was no doubt 
about getting one; also the hole where it 
was. a sure thing; but without other result' 
than a bunch of lake weeds. The monot- 
ony was only broken by the capture of a 
10-pound pickerel that put up a fight of 
great interest while it lasted. 

The sun was high the next morning when 
we started out for our second trial. We 
had paddled some distance over a bed of 
weeds, when a vicious tug, a slight splash, 
followed by a widening swirl on the water, 
suggested a 50 pounder. The line sang and 
screamed as musky bolted for the thick 
patches of weeds. 

"Be careful," cried my guide as the fish 
leaped from the water. "Don't let him 
have any slack! Hold him till I get this 
here boat out of these blamed weeds. Be 
careful or you'll lose him sure !" 

The fish was not to be cajoled into leav- 
ing his point of vantage. Down he sped 
among the entangling weeds, dragging my 
line and my hopes toward certain destruc- 
tion. Then up he came, completely envel- 
oped in a mantle of weeds. There seemed 
to be a boat load of them hanging to his- 
head. There was a frantic shake as he 
rose from the water. The weeds slid up, 
my line snapped, the musky turned over, 
and, with one swirl, was lost to view. 

Then happened a strange thing; one per- 
haps seldom seen. Musky still had the 
spoon hook embedded in his mouth, and he 
made 4 vain attempts to dislodge it. First 
he rose about 50 yards back of the boat and 
shook his head violently, ringing the spoon 
like a bell. Then he fell back, only to repeat 
the attempt 30 yards farther away. ' Twice 
more he failed. The last time he was fully 
100 yards distant, and my guide remarked, 

"Wal, I'll be gol darned. He'll keep that 
up till he's clean played out." 

I replaced the lost spoon with a new one 
and continued fishing. I waited long and 
patiently for a strike. Was that lost mus- 
kalonge calling an assembly of his fellows, 
with his jingling bell, and exhorting them 
^to beware? We fished the morning hours 



FISH AND FISHING. 



43 



away without success, then paddled ashore 
to lunch. After an hour's rest we resumed 
our fishing. We paddled around an is- 
land, and as we moved away from the shal- 
low water there came a straining pull at 
my line. I jerked and an answering tug 
gave challenge to combat. My guide pad- 
dled quickly for the deep water, but I said, 

"Never mind doing that ; this is only a 
small one, very likely another pickerel, or 
perhaps a voracious bass." 

Looking back toward the island, along 
the straining line, I saw it slowly lift, then 
rise from the water with a swish, throw- 
ing fine spray into the sunlight. Could it 
be true ! Yes, a brown body fully 40 inches 
long ! What a picture ! The light steel 
rod bent far back, from the strain. Thirty 
yards of line, every inch above the water 
and as tight as a banjo string, and at the 
Tend the frantic "wolf of the water," thresh- 
ing about in a futile effort to disentangle 
himself!" 

Three times the muskalonge showed his 
full length. Then he retired to the depths 
and sulked. I pulled hard, but he would 
not budge except to send ominous shakes 
of his wicked head thrilling along the tight- 
ened cord. My guide paddled around in a 
circle, and this changing of position en- 
abled me to coax Musky from his retreat. 
Up he came, wavering to and fro, as if ex- 
hausted; but there was no exhaustion in 
that wild rush as he caught a glimpse of 
me! My line whirled out again with a 
screaming Zr-r-r-r-zr-z-z-z. Sulking again, 
he lay near his former place of refuge, gath- 
ering strength for another furious rush. 
Frantic dashes, wicked shakes of his head, 
desperate leaps, were all tried in succes- 
sion, till at last the wolfish fighter came up 
exhausted, and yielded to the conqueror. 

He was a splendid specimen; not quite 
so long as I had imagined when first I saw 
him leap from the water, but long enough; 
38 inches ; and plump, weighing 38 pounds. 

BLOWN IN ON PAYETTE LAKE. 

IDA HODGSON. 

July 15th, 1902, a party of 6 'started, from 
our camp on the East shore of Lower 
Payette lake, to go up the river fishing. 
With 2 rowboats, fishing tackle and lunch- 
eon, we set out at 8 a. m. About 10 130 we 
entered the river and went up as far as 
the log jam, where we tied our boats. 
Then, while some of us were getting din- 
ner, the others went fishing. After dinner 
we all fished until about 4 o'clock. We 
had poor luck, catching only 23 fish. 

At 4:30 we started homeward, but when 
we reached the lake we found the wind 
blowing hard and the waves so high we 
dared not cross. There was nothing to do 
but to remain in the river until the wind 
went down. 



At 7 130 we tried again, the wind having 
moderated. By the time we reached the 
narrows it was blowing as hard as before, 
and the boys were so tired rowing that we 
decided to land. It was nearly dark when 
we beached the boats. The boys brought 
branches and built a fire, round which we 
gathered, telling stories and singing until 
we fell asleep. 

It was just 11 :i5 when I woke and 
found the wind still high. I walked to the 
shore to see if we still had our boats. 
Finding them safe, I stood watching the 
waves, for by that time the moon had risen, 
showing white caps rolling high as far as 
the eye could reach. 

I had been there only a few moments 
when I saw, far down the lake, a moving 
light. Presently I heard a whistle. Then 
I knew it was the steam launch Lyda from 
Lardo, and thought it must be out looking 
for us. Going back to the fire, I roused 
the rest of the party and told them of the 
coming steamer. Building up our fire as a 
signal, we went down to the shore and 
waited. When opposite us the steamer 
stopped, a rowboat put out and we were all 
taken aboard. 

The ride back to Lard© was glorious ; the 
steamer ploughing through the white cap- 
ped waves and dashing spray high in the 
silvery moonlight. 

Reaching Lardo, we had to walk about 
1^2 miles through the sand to our camp, 
which we reached at 1 130. Having had 
nothing to eat since noon, we lost no time 
cooking supper. By 2 130 we were ready 
for our beds, tired but happy. 



Before the District Court of Sheridan 
county, Levi Milton was convicted of dy- 
namiting trout and was fined $250 and 
costs. This is the first case of this kind that 
has been tried here. 

J. E. M., Sheridan, Wyo. 

I hope the disposition of this case may 
have a salutary effect on other game and 
fish law breakers in Wyoming. There are 
some excellent judges in the Western 
States, and our Eastern sages should emu- 
late their example. — Editor. 



AN ANGLING SOLILOQUY. 

N. M. J. 

Soon I'll straddle my bike, 
Like an Alkali Ike, 
And away I will pike, 
Just to do as I like. 



I will go to the stream 
Where the bright waters gleam, 
Yes, I'll go to the crick 
And I'll go mighty quick. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



Anybody can shoot all day but a gentleman always quits when he gets enough. 



HE SHOULD GET AN AMERICAN GUN. 

In April Recreation "Small Game" in- 
quires of the readers of his favorite maga- 
zine as to the best gun, naming 5 well 
known American makes. While I do not 
approach this question from the point of 
view of the theorist or of the expert, yet 
from a practical standpoint I can assure 
Small Game that there is no question in 
my mind as to which of the guns referred 
to I should choose, if he wants a first 
class reliable w T eapon. Small Game is quite 
right in giving consideration to none but 
the products of American ingenuity and 
skill. By all means let us patronize home 
industry in this important matter, and thus 
avoid the disappointment that must, sooner 
or later, fall to the lot of the man who pins 
his faith to a foreign gun. 

I have handled and examined all the 
guns referred to by the inquirer, have seen 
them in action at the trap and in the field, 
and in view of such experience will sug- 
gest to Small Game that he communicate 
with the Lefever Arms Company, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. All the guns mentioned by him 
are good guns, but in my judgment the 
Lefever is superior to any other. Among 
the wealthier class of sportsmen the Par- 
ker is the most popular gun in American 
today, but this is largely a matter of repu- 
tation due to persistent and judicious ad- 
vertising, and to the employment of skilled 
experts to demonstrate these guns. 

I have shot an F grade Lefever for the 
past 7 years, and feel that I can recommend 
it unreservedly to the man who is looking 
for the best gun. In all this time I have 
had neither a break nor a balk which could 
be attributed to defect in material or con- 
struction ; never an accidental discharge 
nor a missfire, to endanger my own life or 
the lives of my companions, nor disappoint- 
ing the shooter at the critical moment. 
With the Lefever the sportsman can go 
afield feeling certain that no accident will 
happen to mar the pleasure of the day. In 
short, the owner of one of these guns can 
and will swear by his weapon, but he never 
has occasion to swear at it. 

The cocking device of the Lefever is 
superior to any in use to-day; is simple, 
positive and absolutely reliable. A friend 
of mine, a mechanic, who is subject to peri- 
odic attacks of gun fever once said to me 
that he had examined critically the "in- 
ternal workins" of every reliable gun, for- 
eign or domestic, and that he considered 
the Lefever the most scientific of them all. 
In point of balance, symmetry and beauty 



of outline, this gun is unquestionably with- 
out an equal. Simplicity is the characteris- 
tic feature in its construction, and the parts 
are fitted better than in any gun of equal 
grade. In the matter of pattern and pen- 
etration, the manufacturers can satisfy the 
most exacting. The safety can be made 
either automatic or independent at will, and 
the hammers can be let down without 
moving the safety forward, a matter of no 
small moment. 

If Small Game will select any one of the 
many grades built by the Lefever Arms 
Company, he will secure a weapon of which 
he need never feel ashamed, and one that, 
in point of execution, will keep pace with 
the fastest company in which its owner 
may have occasion to travel. But I would 
not advise him to be satisfied with the low- 
est priced gun on any list. Instead, let him 
select the highest grade he thinks he can 
afford, then go one better, and my word 
for it, he will never regret his bargain. A 
handsome well balanced and perfect fitting 
gun is always good for 10 points extra at 
the trap or in the field. Results in this life 
are largely a consequence of enthusiasm, 
and the best incentive to good work with 
the gun is the possession of an arm in 
which the owner can feel a genuine pride. 

Some time since D. M. Lefever, for 25 
years manager of the Lefever Arms Com- 
pany, and to whose care and skill the en- 
viable reputation of the Lefever Hammer- 
less guns is largely due, severed his con- 
nection with the old company, and began 
the manufacture (independently) of high 
grade hammerless guns. While I have 
never had the pleasure of examining one 
of the new Lefevers, yet I feel certain that 
the output of the new factory must be 
worthy of consideration. "Uncle Dan" Le- 
fever, as he is familiarly known, is per- 
haps the most widely known and ingenious 
of the inventors and makers of double 
guns. I have one of the catalogues of 
the New Lefever before me, and am satis- 
fied that the prospective buyer would make 
a mistake if he failed to give the new gun 
due consideration. As D. M. Lefever, Sons 
& Co. advertise in Recreation, I would 
suggest that Small Game drop them a line 
requesting information. Let him consult 
both companies, make his own selection, 
and be assured that the word "Lefever" is 
synonymous with all that is reliable and 
up-to-date in hammerless, double guns. 

In answer to further question's by Small 
Game, I would advise a 12 gauge gun for 
hunting purposes ; for trap work, a 12 



44 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



45 



gauge of about 7}i pounds, with 30 inch 
barrels, and bored to suit the skill of the 
shooter. Lefever, Hughesville, Pa. 



A SHOT GUN THAT BEATS A RIFLE. 
Where water fowl abound is where the 
true merit of a shot gun is proven. Most 
any gun will kill pigeons, quail or grouse. 
When it comes to downright hard shooting 
qualities of a gun, try it on a canvasback 
duck or a goose at 60 yards, and if you 
kill you can say you have a good gun. 

Two years ago I was a rifle crank and 
looked upon shot guns as clay target break- 
ers. I had a high priced 12 gauge gun of 
noted make that would do good work at 
the traps, but when I tried it shooting 
ducks, it crippled so many and wasted so 
much ammunition that I laid it away, con- 
sidering it criminal to use such a weapon. 
I have used several shot guns of standard 
makes, but none came up to my idea of 
what a shot gun should do. 

Two years ago I wanted a light gun for 
my wife, and after examining many guns 
I selected a 16 gauge Ithaca. I liked the 
gradual slope of the barrels and the entire 
piece had a business-like look that appealed 
to me. 

Three days later my judgment was veri- 
fied by the killing by the little gun of a 
4-point buck at 62 yards, with No. 4 
chilled shot and 2^ drams nitro powder. 
With two companions I was in the timber 
hunting cattle. Turning a bend in the 
trail we came on 2 bucks. I naturally raised 
my piece to draw a bead on the nearest 
one, with no intention of firing; I would 
have had more confidence in a club. But 
when one of my friends said, "Let him 
have it," I pushed the safety forward and 
fired. Both deer jumped at the report; 
one kept going but the one I aimed at made 
his last jump and dropped dead. We 
found 17 shot had penetrated the heart. I 
then realized that all shot guns are not 
alike. 

Some time previous to this incident I 
used both barrels of my other gun on a 
deer at 35. yards with no more effect than 
to penetrate the hide, causing it to bleed. 
Not knowing how badly the animal was 
wounded and not wishing to have it go 
into the brush to die, I put the dog on its 
track and finally killed it with my rifle. 
That shot gun cost 3 times as much as 
my Ithaca and had wasted more than its 
price, in ammunition. The Ithaca nearly 
paid for itself with the first shot. Since 
then I have killed many deer at various 
ranges with my Ithaca and prefer it as an 
all round weapon, to a rifle. I have never 
lost a deer in the densest underbrush. 
. I have shot and killed hawks, grouse and 
pheasants out of the highest trees, ?r?<? 



some of our trees are over 300 feet high. 
Last fall I shot a large black bear with 
No. 4 chilled shot at 54 yards, killing him 
almost instantly. There are many instances 
I cou ? d speak of, all of which can be veri- 
fied by reliable witnesses, in which my 16 
gauge Ithaca has done remarkably hard 
shooting. I have no difficulty in killing a 
canvasback dtick at 75 yards. This is a 
game country and we carry a gun all the 
time, for we do not know at what mo- 
ment we may see a panther, wild cat or 
bear, and my Ithaca is good for them all 
at any reasonable range. 

J. D. Magee, Templeton, Ore. 



SOME FACTS ABOUT THE .25-35. 

Can .25-.35 Winchester shells, factory 
loaded with high pressure powder, be safe- 
ly reloaded with black or semi-smokeless 
powder ? 

I have an Ideal bullet sizer, .25-. 20. Can 
that be used to resize for the .25-^5 ? 

What is the trajectory, velocity and pen- 
etration of the .25-.35? 

I am with you against the automatic 
shot gun. 

George Bingel, Del Monte, Colo. 

ANSWER. 

The .25-.35 factory ' loaded shells can be 
reloaded even if they have originally con- 
tained high power powder. The principal 
danger about reloading smokeless ammuni- 
tion is the fact that an unusually strong 
primer is used to explode the smokeless 
powder, and this primer contains more 
fulminate of mercury than the ordinary 
black powder primers. Fulminate of mer- 
cury has a great affinity for the zinc or 
spelter contained in the composition of the 
brass shell, and if the shells after being 
fired with smokeless powder are not 
quickly cleansed a decomposition sets in 
which makes the shell brittle. 

I do not consider it wise for any one 
to reload smokeless ammunition for big 
game, unless he is in the woods and has 
to do so. In other words, it is taking an 
unnecessary risk. For target work it is, 
of course, not so objectionable, for if a shell 
splits or even bursts in 2, there will be no 
danger of losing game, and with a good 
shell extractor the parted shells can readily 
be withdrawn from the breech. 

The .25-.20 bullet Ideal sizer can be used 
to resize bullets for the .25-. 35 charge. The 
diameter of the bullet on all .25 central fire 
calibers is .257. The velocity of the .25 is 
close to 1,945 feet. The trajectory is : 100 
yard range ; height of bullet at 50 yards 
1.30 inches. 200 yard range; height of Bul- 
let at 100 yards 6.14 inches. The No. 1 
bullet penetrates about 40 inches in dry 
^ine ; the No. 2, about 10 inches. — Editor, 



46 



RECREATION. 



LIKES THE SAVAGE .32-40. 

I find the Savage .32-. 40 the best rifle 
for all purposes. For full charges use 32 
grains Dupont .30 caliber smokeless, with 
165 grain full metal cased or soft nosed 
bullets. 

With that charge and full metal patched 
bullets, I have shot through 35 7/ 8 inch 
pine boards ; while the killing power of 
the soft nosed bullet is considerably supe- 
rior to that of the .30-.30, I have found 
that a twist so quick as that of the .30-40 
and the .30-.30 is not necessary, even for 
long range shooting. With my .32-.40 I 
can make scores at 500 yards that 1 did 
not even dream of making with a .30.-30. 

For a medium charge I use 12 grains 
Laflin & Rand Sharpshooter smokeless and 
a cast bullet, 1 to 16. This load is nearly 
as accurate as the standard .32-40 black 
powder cartridge, besides being cleaner and 
more pleasant to shoot. For short range 
I use 6 grains of the same powder and a 
105 grain bullet, cast 1 to 20. With this 
load I have put 10 consecutive shots in a 
one inch circle at 50 yards, and the cartridge 
is perfection for small game. 

I use Ideal tool No. 3 and find it just 
the thing for experimenting. I also use 
Lyman rear and wind gauge front sights 
and the Lyman rear, without the cup disk 
and with large aperture, much superior to 
an open sight for hunting. 

I should like to hear from some sports- 
man who has hunted in British Columbia 
as to whether game is plentiful there. 

, M. S. Brown, Hemet, Cal. 



I wish it and its sandy editor all success 
in the world. 

F. A. Windrey, Spokane, Wash. 



ONE OF THE VETERANS. 

I went to California at the age of 8, in 
1862, and ever since have been a hunter 
and a gun crank. My first weapon was a 
old flint lock. From that I worked up, try- 
ing almost every gun as it appeared, to the 
high velocity rifles of to-day. Of black 
powder guns I liked best the 45-70, and for 
long range work it has not been beaten yet. 
Among high power guns my favorites are 
the 30-30 and 30-40; though I think a 
longer barrel and larger caliber would 'be 
better still. 

I have killed a lot of game, but I never 
wasted any nor shot out of season. Many 
a sack of wheat have I strewn around my 
straw stacks for the birds. Last winter 
I fed 7 coveys of quails. I fish, too, and 
use an 8 ounce Bristol rod. I never quar- 
rel with any one — barring fish and game 
hogs— on questions of sport. If I think 
my gun and my rod are the best on earth, 
I still recognize the other fellow's right to 
his opinion. Lastly, I am a constant reader 
and unqualified admirer of Recreation, and 



HARD KNOCKS FOR THE GAME HOG'S GUN. 

I am much pleased at the way you look 
at the automatic gun. Anyone knows that 
our game would be killed fast enough if 
only single barrel .16 gauge guns were 
used. I have used the Winchester pump 
gun in the past, but have -bought my last 
one of that brand. Am now using a dou- 
ble barrel and find it plenty able to deliver 
my share of the goods. I intend to own a 
.32-40 and a .22 Savage in the near future. 
Paddy Marlin couldn't give me one of his 
bear shooters except as a relic. It is too 
bad he doesn't try some of his guns on a 
full grown grizzly and receive the reward 
he so richly deserves. 

The Peters Cartridge Co. is no better. 
What was said about their cartridges stick- 
ing in a pumper is perfectly true; also 
about their .22 ammunition hanging and 
missing fire. I shall use no more of their 
goods. F. G. Smith, Chico, Cal. 



Waukegan, 111. 
Winchester Repeating Arms Co., 
New Haven, Conn. 
Dear Sirs : — I am informed that you in- 
tend to put an automatic gun on the mar- 
ket in the near future. Such a gun is fit 
only for a not hunter and no true sports- 
man will be seen with one. If this arm is 
extensively manufactured, game in this 
country will be exterminated in a few years. 
I sincerely hope that such a gun will never 
be placed on the market for the benefit of a 
few greedy persons who can not get a large 
enough bag with an ordinary gun. 

Harry F. Nye. 



I have just examined one of the auto- 
matic shot guns and it is certainly a mur- 
derous tool which should be kept out of 
the hands of game hogs. No decent man 
would want it. I used a Winchester pump 
a season or 2, but have gone back to a 
16 bore double. Recreation is sound on 
the gun question. 

Carl H. Thober, Newark, N. J. 



I have seen the Winchester automatic 
gun, and I say it is a shame that such a 
weapon should be put in the hands of men 
to destroy the few remaining game birds. 
I hope something will be doMe to prevent 
its use. 

Arthur Borck, Rocklyn, Wash. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



47 



I hope the Winchester people, being in 
business for money, will see the folly of 
putting on the market an automatic gun 
which by exterminating game will kill the 
demand for all sporting weapons. 

H. R. Charlton, Seattle, Wash. 



I wish you great success in your fight 
against the game hog and the new auto- 
matic gun. The latter would finish our 
already diminished fall flight of the wel- 
come webfoot. Keep it up. 

H. J. Dale, Millbrook, Ont. 



Your proposition to stop the sale of re- 
peating shot guns meets with my approval. 
I shall be pleased to do anything in my 
power to prevent the use of any gun carry- 
ing more than 2 cartridges at one time. 

Wm. E. Shoemaker, Cheboygan, Mich. 



SMALL SHOT. 

I have left my shotgun at home the last 
6 years, though I am in camp every Sep- 
tember when grouse are at their best. My 
shooting is all done at targets, one over 
on shore, 200 yards, and one on the island 
in front of my cabin, 100 feet. 

.My rifle is a 303 Savage, and I have 
been engaged 3 seasons in trying to work 
out a short range cartridge that would do 
good work. I do not believe it possible 
for any one to get as good results with 
• small loads in high power rifles as can be 
had with the older rifles. Still I get sat- 
isfactory results with a 125 grain Kephart 
bullet, 1 to 10 tin and lead, and 10 grains 
Savage powder. 

The 170 grain bullet and 10 grains L. 
and R. Sporting Rifle Smokeless also make 
a good combination. 

My island is shaped like a cigar, 40 feet 
wide and 294 feet long. The lake is clear and 
deep and has the small mouth bass, perch 
and rock-bass. Other lakes, which have 
pike, pickerel and muskalonge, are within 
easy reach with my little 10 foot canvas 
boat.. 

T. W. Harrington, 3814 Rhodes Ave.,, Chi- 
cago, 111. 



I have shot many years and with many 
kinds of smokeless powder, and I have 
found none so satisfactory as Robin Hood. 
The recoil is more like that of black pow- 
der, and while it is not excessive it feels 
like business. I have shot it in hot weather, 
in cold weather, in dry weather and in 
damp weather, and it works the same un- 
der all conditions. It is quick, and gives 
fine pattern and penetration. I have never 
found any other powder that did not seem 
to me to deteriorate with age. I have just 
returned from Florida where I did some 
quail shooting, and as I shot a 20 gauge 



I was obliged to carry my cartridges with 
me. Though over a year old they were as 
good as fresh loaded ones, and the result 
in dead birds was perfectly satisfactory. 
I have shot this powder 3 years and have 
never found a cartridge that did not seem 
fully up to standard. 

George Linder, Boston, Mass. 



In February Recreation, Reloader, writ- 
ing about 50 caliber loads, gives one which 
he says will, when fired from a Sharp's 
carbine, put 10 shots in a 2^ inch circle 
at 200 yards and kill squirrels without 
mangling them. This load, as he gives it, 
consists of a hollow base ball with a bear- 
ing of y% inch and weighing 97 grains, and 
7 grains of Gold Dust shot gun powder. 
Is there not some mistake in the weight of 
the bullet? The lightest 50 caliber bullet 
listed by the Ideal Manufacturing Co., if 
the 200 grain round ball is left out of con- 
sideration, weighs 285 grains. 

What cartridge does the Sharp's carbine 
referred to by reloader take? Is it the 
50-45-400 Government carbine, the 50-70- 
450 musket, or one of the sporting cart- 
ridges ? G. T., St. John, N. B. 



Last fall I bought from our local dealer 
a Steven's shot gun, guaranteed to stand 
smokeless powder. After firing it a few- 
times with ordinary factory loaded smoke- 
less charges, the barrel burst at the breech. 
That I did not get .killed was due to good 
luck. I wrote the makers in regard to the 
matter and they referred me to the local 
dealer. Through him they offered to send 
me, on return of the old gun, a new one 
of a better make, that they were putting on 
the market. When the new gun arrived it 
proved to be precisely like the old one. I 
would not shoot it with smokeless powder 
for a farm. I deem it my duty to warn 
sportsmen not to take too many chances 
with the Steven's shot gun. 

S. M. Book, Rushville, O. 



I noticed in Recreation an inquiry as to 
Parker shot guns. I have owned and used 
many of them, from the $50 grade up to 
the $175 ejector. They all shoot evenly 
and hard. In balance and finish, the Par- 
ker beats the world. The Parker people 
are not very accommodating about putting 
extra work on a gun ; for instance, they 
will not accept an order to put an ejector 
on one of their own guns. I sent a $50 
Parker to Chris. Fischer, Grank Forks, 
and he put on it the best a'utomatic ejector 
I ever saw. It works perfectly with any 
shell and is simple in construction, there 
being but 3 pieces to it. I do not see why 
the Parker company do not put ejectors 



4 8 



RECREATION. 



on all grades. Other gun makers will put 
on all the extras you are willing to pay for. 
R. F. Billings, Corona, Cal. 



I have owned all kinds of guns, from the 
flint lock to the pump gun. My last was 
a Winchester pump, and I sold it last Au- 
gust, while away on my vacation. I was 
shooting crows off a corn field, got dis- 
gusted with the gun and sold it for $10. 
In September I got a Remington, grade K, 
12 bore hammerless. Have tried this gun 
on ducks, plover and rabbits, and find it a 
hard hitter at long distances. Will some of 
the many readers of Recreation kindly 
give me their experience with this gun ? 
There may be handsomer guns than the 
Remington, but I don't think there are any 
that shoot better. My gun is full choked 
and shoots a little close for brush work. 
Single Barrel, Montreal, Can. 



I should like to read more in Recre- 
ation about rifles for woodchucks and 
small game. The best 22 cartridge for 
'chucks is the long rifle with hollow point 
bullet. A 'chuck hit in the shoulder with 
one of those is accounted for, while with 
the solid bullet the animal must be hit in 
the head or neck. I am now using a .25-.20 
and consider it an excellent small game 
gun. Mine seems as accurate as a .22 and 
more so when there is a little wind, while 
it has much greater shocking power. 

Ernest W. Vary, Watertown, N. Y. 



W. C. Garthwaite asks the opinion of 
some one who has had experience with the 
Greener gun, as to its merits. 

I have used a 7 pound Greener double gun 
the past 13 years, shooting it at the trap as 
well as in the field. In all that time it has 
never missed fire or cost me one cent for re- 
pairs, and I have given it severe usage. The 
gun is practically as good as new. Still, if 
I were buying a new gun it would be one 
made by Parker Bros., as thev are equal to 
the Greener and cost less money. 

Harry A. Shields, Johnstown, Pa. 



The explanation of the snake head prob- 
lem of W. S. Jones, page 141, February 
Recreation, is probably found in the facts 
stated, namely, a rock bottom and shallow 
water. The head was cut off by the shot, 
the bullet struck the rock in such a manner 
as to rebound toward the bridge, and hap- 
pened to strike the head as it emerged 
from the water, carrying it to the bridge. 
Quite likely the bullet was flattened by con- 
tact with the rock, which accounts for the 
spattering of the water. 

H. A. Dobson, Washington, D. C. 



In the extremely interesting department 
of Guns and Ammunition reference is often 
made to the old Kentucky rifle. Will not 
some of Recreation's contributors familiar 
with the rifles of the past kindly write a de- 
tailed description of that famous gun ? Such 
an article would be of interest to all the 
younger riflemen of the country, many of 
whom have never seen even a muzzle load- 
ing rifle. 

U. N. Dyer, North Appleton, Me. 



I spent 3 weeks last summer at Liberty, 
N. Y., and had great sport hunting wood- 
chucks. I used a Remington No. 4, .22 cal- 
iber and found it an excellent gun for the 
purpose. My friends laughed at the caliber 
and said a .22 bullet would only tickle a 
chuck, but I made clean kills at 100 yards. 
For an inexpensive rifle, the Remington 
can not be beaten. 

C. W. H. Goodyear, New York City. 



The account in December Recreation of 
the exploding of a shell when the gun 
breech was closed reminds me of a sim- 
ilar happening. In my case I had the shell 
measured and it was found that its base 
was a trifle thicker than usual, causing the 
block to jam the primer and thus explode 
the charge. 

C. M. Smith, Campello, Mass. 



I have not fired my shot gun in 10 years. 
You see I am in favor of protecting small 
game, but I am still a hunter. I use a Sav- 
age rifle, generally get one deer in the fall, 
and am well satisfied. The Savage rifle is 
all right, it can't be beat. It is a good hon- 
est made rifle. 

Jos. F. Meyer, Rochester, N. Y. 



I have given my premium Syracuse gun a 
good trial and am more than pleased with 
it. Have tried it at the trap and on ducks 
and grouse, and I think it is the best thing 
a man ever got for so little work. Many 
thanks to you. 

Lon N. Van Duzer, Grand Haven, Mich. 



Will some reader of Recreation kindly 
advise me as to the relative value of the 
Colt .45 Army and .44 Frontier revolvers? 
Which is the more effective arm and which 
gives best results at various ranges? 

Inquirer, Baltimore, Md. 



Will you, through your magazine, request 
any readers who have had practical experi- 
ence with the Winchester 32 Special carbine, 
to give their opinion of it? 

Dr. J. P. Gilmer, City of Mexico. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. If photographed, it may still live and 
its educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



HOW TO SKIN A RATTLESNAKE. 

ELESA M 4 GREMKE. 

The very word rattlesnake fills the aver- 
age person with horror, especially people 
who live in cities and seldom, if ever, come 
in close contact with the reptile. Yet one 
who has made its acquaintance feels no 
sense of creepiness at the sight of a beauti- 
ful diamond marked rattler that promises 
a rare trophy. 

However, great care should be taken 
when traveling through country where the 
rattlesnake abounds. He is likely to be 
found almost anywhere among logs, rocks, 
near trails or running streams; and often 
in bed clothing carelessly left by the camp- 
er on the ground during the day. In high- 
er altitudes, where the temperature is cool- 
er, the reptile does not travel after sun- 
down ; he coils wherever night overtakes 
him. Both huntsman and tourist should be 
constantly on the alert, for the rattler does 
not always give warning when disturbed. 

My brother and I, while traveling last 
summer in the high Sierras, had been rid- 
ing horseback several hours. Being weary, 
we dismounted and' walked for a change. 
Diverted by the beautiful scenery, we 
strolled carelessly along. Finally I tripped 
over a little snag in the trail, but passed 
on a few yards beyond. The thought oc- 
curred to me that possibly some of our 
pack animals, coming on in the rear, might 
stumble over the snag. I retraced my steps 
and began to tug at it. Suddenly I heard 
a loud, fierce rattle close behind me and 
sprang forward. On a bank to the right 
of the trail lay a large rattler, coiled and 
ready to strike. 

Just then the guide rode up, and, secur- 
ing a heavy stick, attacked the snake. At 
the first blow the reptile came down the 
bank into the trail, fighting furiously. He 
bit himself finally, and after a few more 
blows the fight ended. He was 4 feet long, 
6 inches in circumference, and we counted 
13 rattles. To our regret we had to leave 
him because his skin was spoiled in the 
battle. 

There are various ways of dispatching a 
rattler. One who would save the skin 
should be careful to stun or kill the reptile 
at the first blow. A rattlesnake will al- 
ways bite himself if wounded, after which 
the skin is dangerous to handle. If he re- 
mains coiled, with head erect in a fighting 
position, it will be difficult to strike him 
without bruising the skin of the body. If 
let alone he will uncoil and crawl awav. 



The propelling movement being sluggish, 
renders it easy to deal the blow on the 
head, stunning the snake instantly. It is 
then safe to use a forked stick to hold the 
head down firmly while cutting it off below 
the poison sack, which is located under the 
jaw. 

To skin a rattlesnake, make a cut about 
an inch long down the neck; turn the skin 
back and fasten a stout string to the fleshy 
part. Let some one hold it while you take 
the squirming snake with one hand and 
with the other rip down the center of the 
belly. Then pull down the loosened part 
at the neck and it will readily yield till 
you reach the small end of the tail. That 
will have to be carefully separated with the 
knife. Now the skin is ready for the salt 
and alum. Sprinkle it thoroughly on the 
inside and, if you are traveling and unable 
to stretch it at once, roll it in a moist cloth 
and keep in a cool place. 

I kept a skin 3 days in a hot climate be- 
fore I was able to stretch it, and it was still 
in good condition. 

Use 6-ounce tacks and tack an inch apart, 
beginning at the neck and working down 
on either side. A better result can be ob- 
tained by tacking it on a vertical board in- 
stead of in a horizontal position. After the 
skin has thoroughly dried, remove tacks 
and roll it around, or place in a cylindrical 
can, after" which it can be packed with 
safety. 

A SCOURGE OF BLACK FLIES. 

I was much interested in "The Architec- 
ture of a Beaver Dam," by Mr. Frank R. 
Grover, on page 419 of December Recrea- 
tion. 

For several years I have been spending 
part of my summer vacations in Les Chen- 
eauxs and that vicinity. Last August my 
friend "Shag" and I were on Taylor creek. 
Shag and the guide, a native, fished down- 
stream from a point where a lumber road 
crossed the creek. The guide told me I 
should fish upstream to the beaver dam, 
about 2 miles. I found the ruins of the old 
dam and the place where new work was 
going on. In the pool behind the work of 
sticks, stones and mud I caught a number 
of good trout. My orders were to find the 
big ones, above the -beaver meadow, but I 
did not go far beyond the old dam. It is 
of the cause which halted me that I wish 
to have a word with Mr. Grover, who may 
have been there about the same time. 

About 3 o'clock in the afternoon, after 
probably 4 hours' fishing, Shag, the guide 



49 



5° 



RECREATION. 



and I met at the bridge where we had sep- 
arated. We all had good creels of fair 
sized trout, which had been like lightning 
in the icy water, and had risen savagely 
to any lure or bait presented. 

The black flies almost murdered us ; they 
were the most vicious ruffians of the woods 
I ever encountered. It was a peculiar day, 
which had dawned raw and cloudy. At 
times the sun shone brilliantly, raising 
clouds of vapor and making the atmosphere 
warm and close. Then a cloud, preceded 
by a stiff breeze, would blow up from the 
West and bring a shower of rain. The 
trout apparently did not care whether the 
sun was shining or not. They were hungry 
all the time ; but during the periods when 
the sun was shining myriads of the black 
flies rose from the meadows. The breeze 
brought them in clouds. They attacked any 
part of our anatomy on which they made a 
landing. The moment they landed they 
were fast, and our guide said he had never 
seen the pests so fierce. My forehead, ears 
and neck were raw and bleeding at every 
pore. We remained as long as we could 
and then retreated before the attacks. 

It was a 15-mile drive back to Sam 
Meiks', near Les Cheneaux club. Before 
we arrived there my face was badly swol- 
len. During the night the swelling in- 
creased so that both my eyes were com- 
pletely closed. My own mother would not 
have recognized me. The captain of the 
Sea Fox, a Detroit steam yacht, who is also 
a physician, recommended a plaster of un- 
salted butter, covered with a layer of pul- 
verized chalk. A doctor from a camp near 
prescribed epsom salts in large doses, cal- 
omel, etc., and several merciful women 
treated me with witchhazel and delicate 
preparations for the skin. In 2 days my 
eyes opened and the swelling disappeared 
almost entirely. Six months later, after 
a cold day in the open air, all the old symp- 
toms recurred at night and my face again 
took on gigantic proportions. 

Shag did not swell as I did, but for 
weeks every bite showed on his skin and 
about many of the punctures were fierce 
little eruptions. He was everlastingly 
scratching. His physician is still treating 
him in an effort to eradicate the poison 
from his system. 

I should like to know whether any other 
anglers on Taylor creek were as unfortu- 
nate as we, and whether the effects of 
black fly bites are frequently as severe as 
they were in our cases. The flies not only 
spoiled my fishing for that day, but they 
prevented my investigation of the beaver 
dams, and I was exceedingly glad to see 
the description given by Mr. Grover. It 
was my first encounter with the flies, and 
I should like some good brother to advise 
me how to fight them successfully in case 



I should have any further experience with 
the little fiends. 

I am a newspaper man, temporarily out 
of the business, and Shag and I both want 
to know something about the game we were 
up against. None of the natives about 
Taylor creek seemed to know much about 
the fly except that he existed and that you 
were bound to meet him at certain seasons 
if you went into his haunts. Our guide 
said he had never seen the flies so fierce, 
but he seemed to carry something in his 
system which made him proof against their 
poison. 

C. C. G., Pittsburg, Pa. 



PERISHED IN A MINNESOTA BLIZZARD. 

I send you to-day 2 small birds that I 
picked up on the snow, they having died 
apparently from cold and starvation. Thou- 
sands of these birds drifted in here during 
the severe gale of March 26th and 27th, 
and we fed I presume 10,000 of them, 3 
days, as best we could ; but hundreds of 
them died in nooks and corners where they 
had gone for shelter. Can you tell me what 
they are? We never saw any such birds 
here before. 

The winter has no doubt been severe on 
the grouse. As many as a dozen have at 
various times come to our chicken house 
to feed and have become almost as tame 
as our brown leghorns. 

Snow is melting fast now and deer find 
picking generally along the railway tracks, 
but they are poor and weak. 

Trout fishing will be good, as the heavy 
snows, in spite of the severity of the wea- 
ther, has prevented streams from freezing 
as deep as many had thought. 

J. W. Russell, Adolph, Minn. 

I sent the birds to Mr. Hornaday, who 
writes : 

To the casual observer the birds sent by 
Mr. Russell appeared to be sparrows, 
strongly resembling the female English 
sparrow, or, by the printed descriptions, the 
clay-colored sparrow! To Curator Beebe, 
however, the thick and conical bill at once 
revealed the fact that the birds were finch- 
es, and the rather rounded wing and the 
presence of white on the outer tail feathers 
showed the group to which they belong. The 
unusual length of the hind claw revealed 
the fact that the birds belong to the genus 
Calcarius, the longspurs. The pure white 
breast and the inner web of the outer tail 
feather distinguished them from the Smith 
longspur, and showed unmistakably that 
they belong to the species Calcarius lap- 
ponicus, known commonly as the Lapland 
longspur. The spring plumage is just be- 
ginning to appear. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



5i 



PROBABLY A WIDGEON. 
In October last I was shooting ducks 
over decoys A bunch of ducks came down 
with the wind and at the crack of my gun 
one of them fell. I was surprised 
at its size and color. The back of the 
bird was nearly all white, as were the 
wings, while the neck and bill were of a 
fawn color. The body was similar in color 
to that of the blue wing teal. The bird 
weighed 4 pounds. What is the name of 
this bird? 

A Reader, Windsor, Ont. 

The bird may have been an American 
widgeon, Mareca Americana,- but it is im- 
possible to say definitely without seeing it. 
The only way to be certain of getting a 
correct identification of any bird is to cut 
off one wing, the head, tail and feet and 
send them in. Or better still, skin the 
bird carefully, dust the inside of the skin 
with powdered alum, then insert enough 
cotton to keep the different parts of the 
skin from touching and let it dry. For 
fuller instructions as to saving skins read 
Hornaday's "Taxidermy and Zoological 
Collecting," published by Scribner's Sons, 
New York City. — Editor. 



DEFENSE OF THE ROBIN. 

Robin redbreast has found an able defender 
from the attacks of the State Horticultural So- 
ciety in Prof. E. W. D. Scott, who occupies the 
chair of ornithology at Princeton University. 

Prof. Scott completely answers Charles Black, 
of Hightstown, and W. H. Reid, of Frenchtown, 
who presented the main argument for an 
amendment of the State law such as would per- 
mit the extermination of this beautiful and mu- 
sical species of the bird creation, on the ground 
that it destroys immense quantities of fruit each 
summer. 

Robins, Prof. Scott says, consume 60 per cent, 
of insectivorous food and about 40 per cent, of 
vegetable food, mostly wild. When cherries and 
strawberries are ripe, robins undoubtedly do help 
themselves to these dainties, but Prof. Scott says 
that for each cherry and each strawberry, the 
robins destroy 3 to 10 times as much in bulk of 
insects. 

If all the robins in the State were destroyed, 
Prof. Scott says, cherry, apple, peach and pear 
trees and strawberry vines would be overrun with 
insects which the birds now eat and the resultant 
damage to the growers would be incalculable. What 
the fruit growers need, he says, is more insectiv- 
orous birds, not less. 

All this sounds more logical than the plea of 
the fruit growers, as voiced by their delegates 
at Trenton. It is in consonance with nature. 
Surely it_ can not be possible that these beautiful 
birds which have been welcomed by farmers and 
fruit growers for centuries, can have been, or are 
now a nuisance. — Hoboken, N. J., Observer. 



I am with a party of engineers locating 
a new railroad from Corpus Christi, the 
famous tarpon fishing resort, to the Rio 
Grande and 60 miles along the American 
shore. This country is purely Mexican in 
its customs and people. Deer, turkeys, pan- 
thers, Mexican lions, wolves, ducks and 



geese are abundant. The game law is ig- 
nored, for the reason that but few peo- 
ple here speak English. This well watered 
and lovely corner of Texas is one of the 
last stands of. American game, and steps 
ought to be taken now to protect it, be- 
fore the great rush of game hogs which 
will surely follow the completion of the 
road. Then a few hours' ride will take 
one from an up to date American city into 
the wilds of an isolated Mexican ranch 
country, Yours truly. 

Fred Percival. 



A large Holboell's grebe was killed on 
St. Francis river, Poinsett county, latitude 
35, February 15, 1904. It is a male, 
length 20^2 inches, spread 30^ inches, 
weight 2 pounds 1 ounce, not fat. 

An unusual number of golden eyes, gener- 
ally rare visitors, have been seen here this 
season, among them the only female of 
that species I have ever seen. 

Robert H. Mitchell, Marked Tree, Ark. 



Please tell me the correct name of the 
bird called "meadow hen" in the Long Isl- 
and game law. 

Roy Latham, Orient Point, N. Y. 

The bird . referred to as the meadow 
hen is the clapper rail, Rallus longirostris 
crepitans. — Editor. 



There is not much game in this country, 
but about 100 miles South of here there 
are a number of mountain sheep. The In- 
dians kill them by hiding at the water holes 
and shooting them when they come for 
water. 

W. H. Paddock, DeLamar, Nev. 



At last, after years of search, Diogenes 
gave it up. 

"No," he said, "there is no such thing as 
an honest man. Every mother's son of 'em 
will beat the street car company out of a 
ride if he can 1" 

Signaling to the conductor to stop the 
car, he got off at 75th street, put out his 
lantern and went back to his tub. — Chicago 
Tribune. 



"Here's an advertiser," said the Western 
editor's assistant, "who offers us one of his 
'Patent Sadirons for Shirt Bosoms' in ex- 
change for advertising space." 

"Accept it, of course," replied the editor. 
"Some day we may acquire a shirt in the 
same way." — Philadelphia Ledger. 



The Al Vista camera came to-day. To 
say I am pleased with it would be putting 
it too mildly. I thank you for your prompt- 
ness and courtesy. 

Walter S. Abraham, Wall, Pa. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., 
New York. 

1st Vice-President, E. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 80 
West 40th St., New York. 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W. A. Rich- 
ards, General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington 
Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin 
Banking Co., 192 Broadway, New York. 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 
Anderson, A. A., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Beard, D. C, 204 Amity St., Flushing, L. I. 
Blackstone, Lorenzo, Norwich, Conn. 
Buzzacott, Francis F., Chicago, 111. 
Brown, J. Stanford, 48Q Fifth Ave., New York 

City 
Butler, C. E., Jerome, Ariz. 
Carey, Hon. H. W., Eastlake, Mich. 
Carnegie, Andrew, 2d, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, George, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, Morris,- Fernandina, Fla. 
Corbin, Austin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
N. T. De Pauw, New Albany, Ind. 
Dickinson, E. H., Moosehead Lake, Me. 
Edgell, G. S., 192 Broadway, New York City. 
Ellis, W. D., 136 W. 72d St., New York City. 
Fearing, D. B., Newport, R. I. 
Ferry, C. H., 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Ferry, Mansfield, 183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Fraser, A. V., 478 Greenwich St., New York City. 
Gilbert, Clinton, 2 Wall St., New York City. 
Hudson, E. J., 33 E. 35th St., Bayonne, N. J. 
McClure, A. J., 158 State St., Albany, N. Y. 
Mershon, W. B., Saginaw, Mich. 
Miller, F. G., 108 Clinton St., Defiance, O. 
Morton, Hon. Levi P., 681 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Nesbitt, A. G., Maple St., Kingston, Pa. 
O'Conor, Col. J. C., 24 E. 33d St., New York 

City. 
Oliver, Rev. F. E., Winfield, Kans. 
Pierson, Gen. J. F., 20 W. 52d St., New York 

City. 
Prescott, A. L. , 90 W. Broadway, New York "ity 
Rice, A. F., 155 Pennington Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
Rininger, Dr. E. M., 142 E. 27th St., New York 

City. 
Seton, E. T., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Seymour, J. H., 35 Wall St., New York City. 
Smith, E. B., Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, W. H., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Thompson, J. Walter, Times Bldg., New York 

City. 
Towne, E. S., Care of National Blank Book Co., 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Underwood, W. L.. 52 Fuiton St., Boston, Mass. 
Valentine, Dr. W. A., 5 W. 35th St., New York 

City. 
H. Williams, Box 156, Butte, Mont. 



per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 
of them. In ordering please give L. A S. 
number : 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 
Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 

guns, rifles. 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 

goods. 
Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N.Y. Photographic goods 
James Acheson, Talbot St., St. Thomas, Ontario, 

Sporting goods. 



DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 



WISCONSIN DIVISION. 

Wisconsin has a good game law and it is 
well enforced. We let the hunters pay for 
the protection of game, fish and forests, 
and they are willing to do so. This protec- 
tion not only costs the taxpayers nothing 
in our State, but they receive a large sum 
every year through the game wardens, be- 
cause all the money for the fines goes into 
the county treasuries. The money for tres- 
passing on public lands, which law is also 
enforced by our State wardens, goes into 
the school fund. Another good feature of 
our law is that all deputies are State, in- 
stead of county wardens. They all have 
authority over the whole State. This en- 
ables them to work to better advantage, for 
where they are not known they can often 
capture violators of the law who might 
evade them if the wardens were known. 

In Wisconsin a hunter must take out a li- 
cense for all protected game, including rab- 
bits and squirrels. The license fee is $1 
for a resident for all game, $10 for a non- 
resident for small game, and $25 for all 
game, including deer. 

A hunter can take 2 deer home during 
the season, or 25 chickens or 50 waterfowl 
in one day; but no game can be sold except 
rabbits and squirrels, or shipped without 
being accompanied by the hunter. On that 
account and the strict enforcement of the 
law, the deer have increased rapidly with- 
in the last 2 or 3 years. 

To show what game protection can do : 
In localities where we had no quails 3 or 4 
years ago, they are plentiful now,. We 
passed a law last winter to protect them 
for 2 years more. We also passed a law 
to create a State forest commission and a 
practical forester was appointed as superin- 
tendent with a salary of $2,500. 

We had a hard fight again last year 
against spring shooting. Dr. Gropper, an 
active League member, and I appeared be- 
fore the committee for game and fish laws 
and did all we could to kill that bill ; but 
the committee was divided on spring shoot- 
ing, so they made an agreement and com- 
bined the spring shooting bill with the 
bill to prohibit the sale of game, which we 
proposed. Our governor is a great game 
•protector, but if he had vetoed the bill for 
spring shooting he would also have killed 



52 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



53 



the bill which prohibits the sale of all game, 
because both bills were one. Now, hunt- 
ers can shoot only from the loth to the 25th 
of April certain kinds of waterfowl and 
only 15 in one day. I think we will be 
strong enough to kill or amend that section 
next year. If Illinois would prohibit 
spring shooting, it would be easy for us to 
do so. That gives the "shooters," as I call 
them, an argument. It is too bad we can 
not have a uniform or government law for 
waterfowl. 

We protect all kinds of birds, except 
sparrows, hawks, crows and blackbirds. 

About the settlers : Senator Morgan, of 
Minnesota, has said, "They need meat." I 
agree with him; but I would not let them 
think they can kill a deer every day. 
I enforce the law strictly, but make friends 
at the same time. A few game hogs and 
market fishermen don't like me very much. 
I never let a man go if he violates the law. 
It makes no difference to me who the viola- 
tor is ; but after I get him it makes a big 
difference to me if he is rich or poor, a 
farmer's boy or a pot hunter. If he is a poor 
farmer's boy or a settler who kills only 
some game for food for his own family and 
needs it, I am ready to make a motion my- 
self to the court to suspend the fine or a 
part of it and to let him pay the costs, 
which are generally only $1 to $2, because 
I never charge a cent for fees if a man is 
poor. If a man shoots for the market, or 
if he is rich and thinks the laws are made 
only for the poor, I let him pay the highest 
fine. We never make it public that a fine 
is remitted. 

The sentiment among the people has 
changed. Only 2 or 3 years ago, when a 
warden went up in our Northern woods, 
the people there looked on him as an en- 
emy and in some places we could not get a 
meal. Now we are welcomed by the same 
people and they assist us in our hard work. 

The Wisconsin Game Protective Associa- 
tion, a local organization, has also done 
good work in aiding to enact good laws 
and enforce them. 

According to the official report of the 
State game warden, we received last year 
from resident hunters, $78,164; from non- 
resident hunters, license for small game, 
at $10, $2,980; and from non-resident hunt- 
ers license for small game and deer, $9,025 ; 
for set-lines in certain waters and tags for 
same, $500; total, $90,669. 

For trespassing on State lands, $3,164.01; 
330 arrests were made and the fines amount- 
ed to $4,285 ; for seizure of game and fish, 
$2,877.56. 

Thus our department for game protection 
is self-supporting, and gives a large income 
to the taxpayers in our State. 

Valentine Raeth, 
State Deputy Game Warden and Delegate. 



MINNESOTA DIVISION. 

This Division of the League has grown 
steadily during the last year. Our mem- 
bership is now about 650. Our influence 
extends over the whole State and is grow- 
ing stronger. Our efforts have been prin- 
cipally directed toward harmony with the 
State Fish and Game Commission, to whom 
we report violations of law that come to 
our knowledge, knowing that such cases 
will be pushed, if the evidence is sufficient. 
I have, however, paid one reward of $5 for 
a conviction secured through our Heron 
Lake chapter. 

The opinion is now quite general that 
there ought to be a close season on gray 
squirrels and on rabbits. There are still 
too many gunners who, on cloudy days, can 
not distinguish quails or grouse from rab- 
bits, so we intend to help them with a little 
more law and a little more Fullerton be- 
hind it. 

From personal contact with people in the 
country, I can say that they are well pleased 
with our game laws, and with the part the 
League has taken in securing them and 
helping to have them enforced. 

D. Lange, Chief Warden L. A. S. 



A GOOD EXAMPLE FOR LOVERS OF NA- 
TURE. 

The name of Col. Joseph H. McDermott, 
of Morgantown, W. Va., has been add-ed to 
the list of prominent men who are life mem- 
bers of the League. Colonel McDermott, 
though but 33 years of age, has already 
gained for himself an enviable reputation 
as a man of sound character, substantial 
and progressive in business, a thorough 
sportsman and a good fellow. 

For the past 8 or 10 years his business 
has kept him from enjoying outdoor sports, 
though he owns a number of fine guns and 
other paraphernalia, in the possession of 
which only a true sportsman can find pleas- 
ure. He has always taken an active and 
effective interest in the preservation of game 
and. fish and of all harmless wild life. In 
1898 he was the moving spirit in the forma- 
tion of the Monongalia County Game and 
Fish Protective Association. This organi- 
zation did good work, and mainly through 
Colonel McDermott's unselfish and tireless 
efforts kept at it till 1901 when nearly all 
the members joined the League and estab- 
lished a local chapter. He is still a mem- 
ber of that Chapter and will be such to the 
end of his life. 



Jiggs — His song made me sick. 
Wiggs — What was it? 
Jiggs — "Rocked in the Cradle of the 
Deep." — Chicago News. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 
Author of "On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," "Fish as Food," etc. 

"What a Man Eats He Is." 



DANDELION GREENS. 

C. F. LANGWORTHY. 

The common dandelion is a weed which 
gives much trouble in lawns, as it spreads 
rapidly, is not injured to any extent by 
mowing, and unless carefully dug out is 
likely to ruin the turf. It is a common 
practice to give perfect freedom to the 
women and children who every spring in- 
vade the roadsides and parks or private 
grounds in search of dandelion greens. 
Tests carried on at the Maine Experiment 
Station showed that, contrary to the usual 
belief, this is bad for the lawns, for 
in addition to the injury caused by the 
knives and trowels used in digging the 
roots, it is probable that every top or crown 
cut off will in a short time send up in its 
place one to 6 new crowns. 

The dandelion has long been used as a 
potherb, and though digging it from lawns 
can not be recommended, there are many 
places where it can be gathered without 
harm. It is less commonly eaten as a salad 
plant in the United States than in Europe, 
where it is often gathered for this purpose, 
especially in early spring when growth has 
just begun and the leaves are still small 
and tender. Dandelion greens are similar 
to spinach and other common potherbs in 
composition. They contain on an average, 
uncooked, 81 per cent, water, 2 per cent, 
protein, one per cent, ether extract, 11 per 
cent, carbohydrates, and 5 per cent, ash, 
the fuel value being 285 calories a pound. 
Dandelions have a more decided flavor 
than spinach, which is caused by a bitter 
principle contained in the milky juice. 
Canned dandelion greens may he had in 
the market and have substantially the same 
percentage composition as the freshly 
cooked materials. All potherbs are bulky 
foods and do not furnish a large propor- 
tion of nutritive material pound for pound ; 
however, they add a pleasing variety to the 
diet and are undoubtedly wholesome. 

As a cultivated plant the dandelion is as- 
suming an important place in home gardens 
and in the large market gardens, particu- 
larly in New England, where it is grown 
extensively, yielding large returns per acre. 
According to the Maine Experiment Sta- 
tion, it, like celery, is at its best when 
grown rapidly on rich, sandy loam. The 
station gives in effect the following direc- 
tions for its cultivation : Sow the seed in 
the early spring in drills 12 to 15 inches 



apart, and cover one-fourth to one-half 
inch deep. As the young plants are small, 
dark colored and therefore inconspicuous, 
it is well to mix a few radish or lettuce 
seeds with the dandelions, to mark the 
rows. Dandelions should be given the 
same culture as carrots during the summer, 
except that they require thinning to 8 to 10 
inches apart. The following spring the 
leaves will be fit for use, and are best when 
partially blanched by placing a covering of 
boards or boughs over the rows. The 
blanched dandelions are superior to those 
growing wild, being more tender and less 
bitter. The plants are prepared and mar- 
keted in the same way as spinach, and may 
be profitably grown at 50 cents a bushel, 
though the price received is frequently 
much higher. 



ARMY SUPPLIES IN THE PHILIPPINES. 

^ The annual report of the Commissary- 
General of the United States Army states 
that for the Division of the Philippines 
subsistence affairs are now on a settled and 
satisfactory basis. 

The solution of the transportation prob- 
lem, on which so many others hung, greatly 
aided a successful outcome. The reduction 
of the military forces of the islands, and 
consequent reduction of posts, removal of 
troops from interior places, and concentra- 
tion at points on the seacoast and along the 
railroad, thus permitting refrigerator and 
meat boats and commercial liners to make 
regular routes and schedules, all made 
toward a successful solution of the various 
problems. 

The sources of supply of the needed 
foods are various. San Francisco supplies 
the largest portion of the ration and many 
sales stores. Chicago furnishes the bulk 
of the salt meat and meat products, while 
Kansas City and Omaha are also drawn 
on for packing house products. St. Louis 
furnishes a few articles which that market 
can most economically supply. New York 
furnishes the greater portion of the articles 
for sales to officers and enlisted men. The 
policy of the Subsistence Department is to 
buy in the most advantageous market, con- 
sidering cost and quality and the interests 
of the Government, and always favors the 
home or local market, everything being 
equal. In pursuance of this policy, the fol- 
lowing articles were bought at Manila : 



54 



PURE AND IMPURE POODS. 



55 



Fresh beef, fresh mutton, rice, potatoes, 
onions, teas, issue sugar, ice, matches, but- 
ter, cheese, cigars, clothes lines, ginger ale, 
Australian milk, toilet soap, table salt, cut 
loaf sugar, granulated sugar, powdered 
sugar, Tansan water, toilet water, stew- 
ards' stores for transports, and exceptional 
articles. 

Fresh meat is the essential article of the 
soldier's diet, and has, almost without 
exception, been supplied in abundance 
throughout the islands. The chief commis- 
sary of the Division of the Philippines 
says : 

"During the past fiscal year, through the 
services of the Navy Department, the fresh 
beef supply of this division was bought in 
Australia and brought to this city by the 
navy supply vessels. The quality of the 
beef has been uniformly good. Until the 
last cargo the beef furnished was all in 
hind quarters, but on account of the 
drought in Australia and the large demand 
made on the market as a consequence of the 
operations in South Africa, the price of 
beef was considerably advanced, and it was 
found advantageous to purchase both fore 
and hind quarter meat." 

On the subject of fresh beef the chief 
commissary of the Department of Minda- 
nao remarks : 

"It is incontrovertible that troops serv- 
ing in these islands desire a full supply of 
frozen or refrigerated beef, and their prej- 
udice against native beef, or beef cattle ob- 
tained from any source, is so marked that 
they often prefer the canned meats. My 
experience during the past year but con- 
firms earlier convictions that the only prac- 
tical, economical, and satisfactory method 
of supplying troops with fresh meat com- 
ponent of the ration in these islands is by 
bringing to Manila frozen or refrigerated 
beef and issuing it from local and central 
cold storage plants." 



A NOVEL LUNCH ROOM. 
A lunch room was started recently in 
Boston on a somewhat novel plan, which 
aims at providing the best food at low 
rates by eliminating the cost of service. 
Furthermore, it was believed that the wear 
and tear of temper attendant on waiting 
for one's luncheon would be lessened by 
the privilege of serving one's self. Enter- 
ing,, the patron looks up at the bill of fare 
(varied daily), which is posted conspicu- 
ously on the wall ; then, picking up a small 
tray from a convenient pile, slips into the 
slow moving, Indian file of customers, and 
receives promptly, on request, the various 
viands, served out in small dishes from 
large hot boxes behind the counter. The 
savory viands, beef stew, mashed potatoes, 
etc., are found at the first counter, then 



puddings, ice cream, bread and butter, tea 
and coffee, to which cream and sugar to 
taste may be added. A lightning calcula- 
tor at a little desk gives a check covering 
the cost of the trayful, and the lunch may 
be eaten at any one of a number of small 
tables. When luncheon is over the tray with 
the empty dishes is carried to a side coun- 
ter and left there. 

Visitors to Munich will recall that a sim- 
ilar plan is followed at the Hof Brau Kel- 
ler. A visitor who wishes beer selects his 
own stein, washes it at a convenient water 
tap and takes it to the counter where beer 
is served. If sausages and bread are also 
wanted, they are procured in like manner. 
A table is chosen and you are ready to en- 
joy the fruits of your labor. 

COOKING IN FRANCE. 

A Frenchwoman, according to a recent 
writer, never heats her house by cooking 
or baking foods except in winter. Con- 
nected with many of the shops where fruit, 
vegetables, poultry, and game are sold is a 
place for roasting. This is generally in 
full view of the public. One can order a 
roast from these places, or the meat and 
poultry may be prepared and sent to these 
rotisseurs to be roasted. The cooking is 
done before an immense wood fire in an 
open fireplace. The meat is put on a spit, 
which is turned constantly by clockwork. 
The roasting generally begins about 4 
o'clock in the afternoon, and continues till 
9 o'clock in the evening. Cold roast poul- 
try can always be obtained at such shops, 
which do a wonderful trade all the year 
round. Many of the geese, turkeys, and 
chickens, are cut up into 2, 4, or more 
pieces ; a wing or a leg can even be bought. 
They are all placed on white china dishes 
and ticketed. You select according to your 
means. 

I received the Bristol steel rod you sent 
me as a premium for a club of 5 subscrib- 
ers. It is a beauty and I am well pleased 
with it. I thank you, also for the Laughlin 
fountain pen. 

C. Griffin, So. Bethlehem, N. Y. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's jour- 
nal I ever read. 

Will H. DeGroff, Fleming, N. Y. 



Recreation is the highest type of litera- 
ture in its class. 

L. T. Jackson, Ypsilanti, Mich. 

Recreation is a gem, and I can't do 
without it. 

Fred Zimmerman, Moray, Kan. 



/ 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



THE NEW WONDERLAND. 

The 1904 edition of the Northern Pacific 
"Wonderland" is out, and all that need 
be said of it is that it is fully up to 
the excellent standard of its pre- 
decessors. It deals with many 
subjects that are dear to the 
heart of every sportsman, includ- /J 
ing carefully tabulated informa- 
tion as to where various species 
of game and game fishes may be 
found. It gives a lot of interest- 
ing and valuable reminiscences 
regarding the explorations of Lewis and 
Clark, of Maximillian, the Spanish trav- 
eler, of the developments and improvements 
in the Yellowstone National Park, and of 
the great irrigation works in the Yakima 
country. 

The book is jam full of beautiful, inter- 
esting and instructive pictures of scenes 
along the Northern Pacific railway, by art- 
ists and art photographers. Some of the 
drawings date back nearly 100 years and por- 
tray the great Northwest in its halcyon days. 
There is one photograph reproduced on page 
39 showing 10 mule deer on the parade 
ground at Fort Yellowstone in the Yellow- 
stone National Park, which is alone worth 
the price of admission. One of the most grat- 
ifying sights open to the sportsmen tourists 
of to-day is the herds of deer, elk, mountain 
sheep, antelope and buffalo which are to 
be found in that wild animal republic. The 
United States Government has never done 
so good a thing anywhere else, in the way 
of preserving our wild animals, as in the 
creation and maintenance of that park, and 
the success of this venture has proven the 
necessity of establishing such havens of 
refuge in various Western States. We all 
hope this may be done in the near future. 

The Northern Pacific railway has been an 
important factor in the creation and devel- 
opment of the Park and it is only proper 
that it should now reap the benefit of its 
work by carrying thousands of people there 
every summer. 

Any person can get a copy of "Wonder- 
land" by writing A. M. Cleland, G. P. A., 
St. Paul, Minn., and enclosing 6 cents in 
postage. The book is easily worth $1. In 
writing please mention Recreation. 



any size desired, from 22 caliber up to 50. 
The time was when a man going into the 
big game country wanted a belt full of 
cartridges ; but that time is past. Most men 




A NEW BELT. 
The Marble Safety Axe Co. has turned 
another trick. This time it is a cartridge 
carrier, made of leather and so arranged 
that it can be slipped on an ordinary belt. 
The sample before me is made to hold 14 
cartridges, and these carriers are made in 



now go out with only what cartridges thev 
can place in the magazine. S^me'imcs it 
is necessary to have a few more, and this 
new scheme of Marble's will answer every 
requirement for a day's hunting in any 
country. 



ALL WOOL AND A YARD WIDE. 
Persons going into the woods or moun- 
tains, or on the water, should all know the 
need of wearing woolen underclothing. 
There is no item in a camping or fishing 
outfit more important than that of clothing 
which is to be worn next the skin. After 
an experience of 40 years, a large portion of 
which has been spent in the woods, I can 
say truthfully and conscientiously that I 
have never found any underwear so thor- 
oughly adapted to the needs of campers as 
that made by the Jaeger Sanitary Woolen 
Company, and I think every man who has 
ever worn Jaeger underwear will agree 
with me in this statement. These goods 
are absolutely all wool and the wool is pre- 
pared more carefully before being made up 
than by any other manufacturers I know 
of. I have several times ventured to buy a 
suit of underwear of some other make, 
which was recommended as "just as good"; 
but none of these has ever proven anywhere 
near it ; so I have always gone back again 
to the old standby, and shall probably con- 
tinue to buy Jaeger goods as long as I live. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
A. W. Bishop & Son, Racine, Wis. 

Dear Sirs : I am much pleased with your 
novel invention. I gave the reel and inde- 
pendent spool as severe a test as possible 
and nothing could work better. I had no 
difficulty in casting a small frog 75 to 140 
feet from the boat. Your reel beats my fine 
Julius Vom Hofe reel, and I would not part 
with yours if I could not get another. It 
has another advantage over all other spool- 
ers, as in case the guide should get out of 
line, caused by backlash, ont can slip off the 
band and turn pulley on spooler until the 
guide is in line with the line on the spool. 



56 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



57 



You will get more orders from here as all 
my friends are enthusiastic over it. 

Yours truly, Jno. F. Perkins. 

The 1904 edition of "Fishing on the 
Picturesque Erie" has just been issued by 
D. W. Cooke, General Passenger Agent of 
that road. The book is brimful of infor- 
mation, as usual, and every Eastern angler 
should have a copy of it, whether or not 
he may intend to fish on the Erie. There 
are dozens of pictures in this book that 
will make an angler's mouth water, and it 
is a great satisfaction to know that if you 
ever do get 2 days in a bunch when you 
are not compelled to work, you can pack 
your grip, step on an Erie train and in 3 
or 4 hours be next to the black bass. 

In writing for the book, please mention 
Recreation, 



The Century Camera Company has issued 
a new catalogue in which amateur photog- 
raphers will find much to interest and in- 
struct them. The book is beautifully and 
elaborately illustrated with photographs of 
a variety of subjects, made with Century 
cameras. It also contains illustrations of 
all the Century cameras and a great deal 
of valuable text. A new feature of the 
Century line is the revolving back, which 
is certainly a great improvement over the 
old form of reversible back. This new de- 
vice is fully described and illustrated in the 
new book. Write for a copy, to the Cen- 
tury Camera Company, Rochester, N. Y., 
and mention Recreation. 



Janesville, Wis. 
D. M. Tuttle Co., 

Canastota, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs : 

Our 4 H. P. Jump Spark engine bought 
of you last spring has exceeded your guar- 
antee in every respect. It is simple, strong 
and absolutely safe and reliable. 

There are 15 gasoline and 3 steam 
launches owned here, of one to 7 H. P., 
and my launch, the Russell G., has led the 
entire lot the whole season. 

Thanking you for your generous treat- 
ment, I remain, 

Yours truly, 

C. C. Searles, 



The Marble Safety Axe Co., of Glad- 
stone, Mich., has put out a new model 
knife called the special hunting knife. It 
has a straight bevel ground blade, with 
bone chopper at back of point, and the 
blade is a quarter of an inch thick. There 
are 2 oblong recesses in the sides of 
tang, thus making the knife balance per- 
fectly. The side plates are selected slabs 
of German stag horn This blade is 5 inches 



long and the knife sells at $2.50. This new 
knife is illustrated in Marble's latest cata- 
logue, which also illustrates and describes 
many other handy tricks for sportsmen. 
Get a copy of it, and mention Recreation. 

W. R. Crosby, one of the champion shots 
of the world, was treated to a surprise re- 
cently in Atlanta, Ga. Despite a heavy 
wind, amounting almost to a gale, Mr. 
Crosby broke 94 out of 100 clay birds, a re- 
markable record under such adverse cir- 
cumstances, yet he was beaten by one bird, 
as Mr. Worthen smashed 95 of the clay 
flyers. 

The battle between these 2 men was a 
right royal one, and Mr. Worthen and the 
Parker gun achieved a triumph of no mean 
merit. Mr. Worthen used, as he always 
uses, the Old Reliable Parker gun. 



I wouldn't take a dollar for it, says a man 
who owns a copy of Polk Miller's book, 
"Dogs." A copy of this book only costs 3 
cents in stamps to cover expense of mail- 
ing. No dog man or kennel owner should 
be without it. When you haven't it, you'll 
need it most, therefore write now to the 
Polk Miller Drug Co., Richmond, Va., for 
a copy. Don't fail to enclose 3 cents in 
stamps to pay postage. This same firm will 
charge you nothing whatever to prescribe 
for your sick dog. In writing them, please 
mention Recreation. 



Marble, the axe manufacturer of Glad- 
stone, Michigan, has invented an aluminum 
knife sheath protector that is interesting 
and that will certainly prove useful. The 
aluminum sheath slips into the inside of 
any of his leather sheaths and prevents the 
knife from cutting into the leather. This 
metal lining costs only 15 cents postpaid. 
Make a diagram of your hunting knife, 
send it to Marble with 15 cents in stamps, 
and you will get the trick by return mail. 
In writing, please mention Recreation. 



The Savage 22 caliber junior single shot 
rifle has just been placed on the market by 
the Savage Arms Company, Utica, N. Y. 
It shoots the C. B., short, long and long 
rifle cartridges, and, as with all Savage 
rifles, has some new mechanical features. 
It is an excellent little gun to take into 
camp or away on your vacation, as a com- 
panion piece to your big game rifle. The 
little rifle goes nicely into your pack and 
is well worth the price for which it sells, 
$4. The same Savage quality all through. 



Douglass H. Shepherd, Taunton, Mass., 
is making glass eyes to be used in mount- 
ing birds and animals, and it would be 



58 



RECREATION. 



well for all readers of Recreation who 
are interested in taxidermy to get his circu- 
lar and price list. Mr. Shepherd is a young 
man, but has been engaged in this work 
for other people during the past 7 years. 
He has lately started business himself, and 
I am glad to be able to commend him to my 
readers. 



published by C. W. Thompson & Co., of 
Boston. 



Spratt's Patent, Newark, N. J., has pub- 
lished a new edition of "The Common 
Sense of Dog Doctoring." The book has 
been recently revised and enlarged by add- 
ing to it a lot of valuable information on 
various topics of interest to dog fanciers. 
This book sells for 25 cents, hence there is 
no reason why every owner of a good dog 
should not have a copy of the book at hand. 
In writing for it please mention Recre- 
ation 



The Ideal Mfg. Co. has issued a book 
giving full instructions as to how to load 
and reload 30-40 Krag and other shells 
for high power rifles. This, like all the 
other publications that come from the 
Ideal people, is jammed full of detailed 
information, and every rifleman should 
haA^e a copy. In writing please mention 
Recreation. 



A profusely illustrated booklet of 40 
pages, descriptive of St. John and New 
Brunswick, containing maps and useful in- 
formation for the traveler has been re- 
ceived from the Secretary of the New 
Brunswick Tourist Association at St. John, 
N. B. Copies will be mailed free to any 
address on application to Mrs. R. E. Olive, 
Secretary, St. John, N. B. Any person con- 
templating a trip to New Brunswick should 
be supplied with this book. 



Fred Gilbert, the champion trap shot of 
1902 and 1903, is doing wonderful shooting 
this year. Out of 1,000 targets shot at in 
9 events, he broke 962, or 962-10 per cent. 
Gilbert was shooting the old reliable 
Parker. 

Mr. T. W. Morfrey holds the champion- 
ship of New Jersey, won with the Parker. 

Walter Huff, shooting at 100 targets at 

Macon, Ga., broke 69 

Columbus, Ga., broke 94 

Americus, Ga., broke 96 

Such scores as these speak volumes for 
the Parker gun. 



R. C. W. Lett, an old time contributor 
to Recreation, and a man who has won 
several prizes in my various photo compe- 
titions, has written a song entitled, "I Saw 
A Star." It has been set to music and 



At Lexington, Ky., Mr. Robt. R. Skinner 
using a Parker gun broke 49 out of his 
first 50 clay birds and then broke 71 out of 
75. Mr. Skinner is loud in his praises of 
the Parker gun, and is a shooter of con- 
siderable ability. 



NEW PATENTS. 

Patent No. 753,189 has been issued to W. 
C. Buckalew and J. P. Flournoy, Jr., 
Shreveport, La., on a new device for clean- 
ing rifles. 

Patent No. 752,809 has been issued to 
M. E. Sutherland, Westville, Canada, on a 
rifle rear sight. 

Patent No. 752,932 has been issued to C. 
H. Snow, Stockton, Cal., on a magazine 
gun. 

Patent No. 752,550 has been issued to J. 
C. Heritage, Minneapolis, Minn., on a land- 
ing net, which is arranged to fold up into 
convenient shape for carrying. 

Patent No. 752.600 has been issued to 
W. A. Sinclair, Springfield township, Kal- 
kaska county, Mich., on a device for auto- 
matically closing the cover of a fish basket. 

Patent No. 752,786 has been issued to A. 
E. Leaver and W. H. Leaver, Chicago, 111., 
on a fishing reel. 

Patent No. 745,561 has been issued to 
Peter Bergersen, Cheyenne, Wyo., on a so- 
called practice barrel for rifles. The de- 
vice consists of a headless shell to be in- 
serted in a rifle barrel and within each a 
shorter cartridge than the regular one in- 
tended for the rifle may be inserted. 

Patent No. 745,657 has been issued to 
O. H. Peak, Parsons, Kans., for a single 
trigger mechanism for double barrel guns. 

Patent No. 745,825 has been issued to 
J. D. Guthrie, Shelbyville, Ky., for a drying 
reel for fishing lines. 

Patent No. 745,885 has been issued to 
O. P. Mosberg, Chicopee Falls, Mass., for 
a single barrel breech loading shot gun 
mechanism. 

Patent No. 746,619 has been issued to 
Joseph P. White, Savannah, Ga., on a single 
trigger mechanism for shot guns. 

Patent No. 747,350 has been issued to 
Herbert B. Andrus, Dillon, Mont., on a 
rear rifle sight. 

Patent No. 747,422 has been issued to 
Clinton B. Helm, Rockford, 111., on a cart- 
ridge loading machine. 

Patent No. 747,732 has been issued to A. 
Kremer, Sacramento, Cal., on a decoy duck. 

Patent No. 746,859 has been issued to 
Albert D. Marble, Oklahoma, Okla., on a 
cartridge magazine, which is to be inserted 
in the breech of a rifle. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



HOW SOME PHILADELPHIA ROOTERS 
WERE CAUGHT. 
Late last fall a large party of hunters, 
not sportsmen, went to Clearfield county, 
Pennsylvania, and engaged in hunting deer 
with dogs. Several deer were run into the 
water and killed, thus effecting a double 
violation of the State law. Deputy State 
Warden Joe Rightnour went after the 
bristlebacks, rounded them up and took 

them before Justice , of Car- 

thaus, who persistently refused to hear 
any evidence against the men and dis- 
charged them. Their trial was set for a 
certain hour in the day, and Dr. Josephus 
Kalbfus, secretary of the State Game Com- 
mission, started to Carthaus to attend the 
trial. On arriving there he found the men 
had appeared before the Justice several 
hours before the time set for the trial and 
had been dismissed. 

As every sportsman in Pennsylvania 
knows, Dr. Kalbfus does not quit a case 
when he starts on it until he has exhausted 
every resource. He followed up these mis- 
creants, arrested 6 of them, took them be- 
fore another Justice and had them bound 
over. Meantime, several of the men weak- 
ened, pleaded guilty and paid fines of $100 
each and costs, the total amounting to 
nearly $1,200. One of the other men caught 
cold while breaking the law and died. 

The names and addresses of the poach- 
ers, so far as learned, are : Alois Oslertag, 
a hotel-keeper of Philadelphia; George D. 
Kelley, Philadelphia; O. S. Bailey, J. D. 
Burkhart and J. D. Wolf, of Sinnemahon- 
ing, and William Shultz, of Carthaus. 

The lesson taught by Dr. Kalbfus and 
Mr. Rightnour has proved a most salutary 
one, and has aroused the indignation of all 
friends of game protection in Clearfield 
county. It is certain that not only the 
sportsmen of that county but the farmers 
as well, will keep a sharp lookout for game 
law violators hereafter, and it is not^ likely 
these Philadelphia swine will again invade 
that neck of woods. 



HOW 2 CHICAGO HUNTERS CAME TO 
GRIEF. 
John Baumgartner and Henry Cidjake, 
of Chicago, went to Escanaba, Mich., last 
fall, got a team, drove to Round lake, made 
a camp and went to hunting deer without 
going through the formality of taking out 
a license. Game Warden Aaronson, of Es- 
canaba, camped hear them and ostensibly 
went hunting deer also. He, however, 
spent all his time while in the woods in 
getting evidence against the 2 non-resident 



hunters. He finally became friendly with 
them, and when they told him what day 
they would leave the woods, he announced 
that he would go out about the same time, 
so they invited him to ride with them. 
The Chicago hunters packed a lot of veni- 
son in a big trunk they had brought in 
with them, locked it up and told their 
neighbor they intended to have it checked 
home on the pretext that one of the own- 
ers was a commercial traveler. When the 
outfit arrived at a half way house and the 
owner came out, he recognized the game 
warden and innocently called him by his 
title. This sprung the trap and the 2 Chi- 
cago men asked the warden what he was 
going to do about it. He told them he was 
going to take them to court. They put up 
a bluff and threatened to fight. He told 
them that was useless and that he should 
take them, dead or alive. Then they weak- 
ened and were finally landed in Rapid River, 
where they were arraigned before a magis- 
trate and fined $50 each and costs of $22.85. 



MISCALCULATED THEIR DEPTH. 
Four whales entered the mouth of the 
Sislaw river, Oregon, in April last, on a 
high tide. The watchman at the Govern- 
ment jetty took a rifle, got into a boat and 
went after them. They started out to 
sea, but in shying around the boat 3 of 
them ran aground and were unable to get 
off. The 4th started up the river, when 
the watchman shot it. It turned over 
and appeared to be dead. The watchman 
put a rope around its tail and attempted to 
tow it down the river but was unable to 
move it. A steam tug came along and 
hitched on, when the whale revived and 
started up the river again, dragging the 
boats with him. The tug struck a shoal 
and her line parted. The whale turned and 
headed for the ocean, struck the watchman's 
boat, breaking it into splinters and pitching 
the man about 20 feet into the air. He suc- 
ceeded in swimming ashore, but did not 
relish the cold bath he got. When the tide 
went out the 3 whales were left high and 
dry and the people of the neighboring town 
of Florence cut them up and converted 
them into oil. Two of the whales were 42 
feet long, each, and the other 40 feet. 



MANITOBA KNOCKS OUT THE AUTO- 
MATIC. 

Section 14 of the game law recently en- 
acted by the Legislature of Manitoba, reads 
as follows : 

"None of the contrivances for taking or 



59 



6o 



RECREATION, 



killing the wild fowl known as swans, 
geese or ducks, or any of the birds men- 
tioned in sub-section a of section 7 of this 
Act, which contrivances are described or 
known as batteries, swivel guns, automatic 
guns, sunken punts or night lights, shall be 
in the possession of any person, nor shall 
they be used at any time; nor shall any 
beaver or muskrat house be destroyed at 
any time; nor shall any spring gun be 
used to kill or destroy any animals herein- 
before mentioned." 

There are men who claim that you can- 
not prohibit the use of an automatic gun by 
law. Such men would no doubt admit that 
the present Manitoba law is all right in for- 
bidding the use of batteries, swivel guns, 
spring guns, sunken punts and night lights. 
If it be proper to legislate against the use 
of one form of slaughtering device, why not 
against another? 

PLEASE WRITE THE GAME AND FISH 
HOGS. 
There are many men who believe I speak 
only my own sentiments when I condemn 
game butchers and that my custom of re- 
buking them is not approved of sportsmen 
in general. In order to convince these men 
that their slaughtering of game and fish is 
condemned by all good sportsmen, I should 
like the cooperation of my readers. 

I wish you would hereafter write letters 
or postal cards direct to every man whom I 
may denounce in Recreation for slaughter- 
ing game or fish and endorse what I may 
have said of him. Add to each man's ad- 
dress his number , in the swine book, so 
there may be no question as to identity. 
For instance, address Col. F. W. Dunn, 
Game Hog No. 972, Los Angeles, Cal. Put 
his number on the envelope or postal card, 
as the case may be. 

By this method, you can greatly aid in 
my work of making these men ashamed of 
themselves, if they have any such quality 
left in them. 



NOTES. 

At a recent meeting of the Pinehurst 
Gun Club these officers were elected for 
the ensuing year : President, H. W. Priest, 
Franconia, N. H. ; Vice President, H. A. 
Page, Aberdeen, N. C. ; Secretary, H. L. 
Jillson, Worcester, Mass.; Treasurer, T. B. 
Cotter,' Winchester, Mass.; Captain C. A. 
Lockwood ; Lieutenants, A. E. Laird, Wash- 
ington, D. C, M. C. Parshall, Warren, Pa., 
M. B. Byrnes, New York City. 

The program for next season's tourna- 
ments was referred to a committee which 
will announce the events in the fall. 



March last, a thing no good sportsman 
should ever do, and in the course of the 
day killed 2 quails. They were arrested 
and when taken into court claimed they 
thought the birds were ducks when they 
got up. A man who can not tell a duck 
from a quail when he sees it, should not be 
allowed to use a gun 

We have recently organized divisions of 
the League in Mississippi, North Carolina, 
Alabama and Louisiana. This leaves only 
2 states in the Union unorganized. These 
are Delaware and the Indian Territory. The 
sportsmen of these 2 states should now get 
a move on them and send in the necessary 
number of applications to enable us to or- 
ganize there. 



I am informed that Wm. Hanson, of Har- 
risville, Alcona county, Mich., located on 
the Detroit & Mackinac railway recently 
caught a brook trout 28 inches long and 
which weighed 9 pounds 6 ounces. This 
is supposed to be the largest brook trout 
ever caught in Michigan. The fish has been 
photographed and mounted. 



I have just received the Ithaca gun you 
sent me as a premium and am delighted 
with it. I thank you very much for your 
kindness and promptness in the matter. If 
I can at any time get more subscribers for 
you, I shall be glad to do so. 

Wm. Lane, Bridgeport, Conn. 



"Don't be too quick to strike another, my 
boy," said the kindly old man, who had 
interrupted the fight; "always count 10 
before you do it, and then " 

"Yes," replied the boy, contemptuously, 
"an' den it'll be de referee dat'll be countin' 
10 on you."— Philadelphia Press. 

Shem and Ham leaned against the rail 
of the ark looking at the schools of fishes 
in the water. "Ham," said Shem, "just 
think of all those fishes, and we with only 
2 worms on board ! ' 



"Do you think the street car system in 
New York is worse than in any other 

town?" 

"Oh, yes, much worse. It's in abler 
hands." — Exchange. 



I received the Harrington & Richardson 
shot gun and am 30 pleased with it that I 
am trying to get up another club for you. 
J. Leonard, Blossburg, Pa. 



Lylle Landred and Charles Mentzer, of 
Schuyler, Neb., went duck shooting in 



Recreation is the best magazine I ever 
read. 

G. L. Rainboth, Aylmer, Que., Can. 



RECREATION. 



61 




THE' 




< ''■.: 




■V« 



PRUDENTIAL 

HAS THE 

STRENGTH OF 




T 



Big and Strong 











A Steadily Increasing Business is Proof of Public Confi- 
dence in its Plans of Life Insurance for Both Sexes. 

New Business, 1903, over 293 Million Dollars. 
Number of Policies in Force over 5% Millions. 

THE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE CO. OF AMERICA 



JOHN F. DRY DEN, President. 



Write (or Information— Dept. Q2 




Home Office: NEWARK, N. J 



"Visit THE PRUDENTIAL'S EXHIBIT, Palace of Education, World's Fair, St. Louis. 



62 



RECREATION. 



SEEN BY THE GREAT HORNED 
OWL. 

SHERMAN A. PADDOCK. 

The dense, all-pervading gloom of a 
summer night settled slowly over the for- 
est, wrapping it in black as if in mourning 
for the day just dead. The contented 
little forest birds gave a goodnight chirp, 
the saucy red squirrels one last chatter, and 
the stately ruffed grouse tucked his tufted 
head beneath closely folded wing to await 
the dawn. The cautious rabbit hopped si- 
lently from his grassy retreat, the buck 
stamped on the resonant earth as he went 
forth with his harem, and the great 
horned owl, with a soft, euphonious swish- 
swishing of his mighty wings, sailed grace- 
fully from his hiding place in a monster 
spruce, startling the tiny sawwhet into ut- 
tering its old "queech - quench - queech - 
queech." 

The great horned owl wings his easy 
flight through the solitude, looking with 
watchful eyes for his evening meal. Sud- 
denly he pauses in his onward flight, curves 
to the left, hovers, then swoops downward 
with the speed of an arrow, dodges under- 
neath a log and rises with a disappointed 
shake of the tail, for bunny has escaped 
him. The next attempt is more successful. 
An unfortunate . rabbit, grasped in cruel 
talons, gives a shrill scream as a blunt 
beak is driven with the force of a hammer 
into the base of his skull. The great 
horned owl, lifting his limp burden, flies 
heavily to a distant pine, and there, en- 
sconced in its highest branches, places the 
dainty feast upon a bough and breaks his 
fast. His great, honey colored eyes glance 
toward the roots of the old pine and a cu- 
rious fire burns within them when he sees 
2 youths slumbering there, their -guns at 
their heads, a dog at their side. One the 
great horned owl has never seen ; the other, 
though he has not seen him for many years, 
he recognizes as the trapper's son. Proba- 
bly the boy is home on a visit and the one 
beside him is undoubtedly his college 
friend. The great horned owl remembers 
having heard the proud old trapper tell 
how he had saved the proceeds of 10 years' 
trapping that the boy might attend college. 

The wind toys with the leaves of the 
silver birch and plays sweet music among 
the redolent pines. From far away and 
faintly comes the wailing cry of a lynx, 
but the boys slumber on. The great horned 
owl picks at the inanimate flesh before him, 
a silent sentinel. From the South comes 
the sound of a crackling stick, then all is 
still. The great horned owl watches ; the 
dog below cocks an ear attentively forward, 
opens his eye and listens. A ray of light 
appears, dances about on the hoary tree- 
trunks, and brings into view 2 shadowy 
forms The great horned owl is experi- 
enced. He knows the shadowy forms are 
deer hunters, with guns and one with a 
bull's-eye lantern strapped on his head. 
The sentinel sends forth his challenge, 
"Whoo-whoo-who-who." No answer. The 



dog growls softly and his eyes burn like 
coals in the advancing light. Nearer and 
nearer draw the figures. They see the 
gleaming eyes, stop, lift their guns, aim, 
fire. The buckshot hurtles true to the 
mark, the eyes disappear, and there comes 
a sound as of something struggling. 

"We've got him !" cries the man with 
the light. 

"Yes," chorused the great horned owl, 
"you've got him — the trapper's son." But 
the men, not understanding owl language, 
pay no heed. A wild human cry breaks 
from where the eyes had been. The cow- 
ardly hunters, realizing their awful mis- 
take, dash the light to the ground, mutter 
startled exclamations, turn on their heels 
and flee madly through the forest. The 
companion of the trapper's son lights a 
match and gazes at 3 black spots on his 
friend's face and forehead ; sees, also, that 
the dog is dead. Then, jumping to his 
feet, he runs like a frightened deer toward 
the West. 

"Queech-queech-queech queech," says the 
sawwhet. The great horned owl devours 
his victim and waits. The moon appears, 
tints the treetops with delicate silver, and 
is 2 hours high before the sound of crack- 
ling brush is again heard. The sound ap- 
proaches and soon the boy comes into view 
accompanied, by an old man with flowing 
beard and hair of snowy whiteness, bare- 
footed and hatless, dressed only in trousers 
and buckskin shirt. He sinks beside the 
body stretched at the foot of the pine, lights 
a match, eagerly scans the features and 
then, clasping his hands and sinking back 
on his knees, breaks into sobbing lamen- 
tation : 

"He's dead! my son! my last and only 
hope ! For 10 long, weary years I worked 
and struggled and saved that he might 
amount to more than his poor old father ! 
And this — this is the end. This is my re- 
ward !" 

"Queech-quench-queech-queech !" says the 
sawwhet. The great horned owl, with a 
last mournful hoot, launches himself from 
his lofty perch and is lost in the recesses 
of a cedar swamp. 



A German immigrant sought to obtain 
citizenship in the United States. 

"You have read the Constitution of this 
country?" asked the judge to whom appli- 
cation for naturalization was made. 

"No, your honor," responded the Ger- 
man ; "no, I haf not read der Constitu- 
tion;! but my frent Krause he haf read it 
to me, und I like it fery much. It is fery 
nice, your honor, und I am much bleased 
mit it!" 

The judge granted the necessary papers. — 
Saturday Evening Post. 



I would not be without Recreation. It 
is the cleanest and best sportsman's maga- 
zine published. Game hogs are thick here 
and I wish you could come down and ring 
a few dozen of them. 

Frank Dettman, Gait, 111. 



RECREATION. 







THE 



HENRY B HYDE 



JW.ALEXANDER 

PRESIDENT ; 



STftm 




JHHYDE 

VICE PRESIDENT 



FREEDOM 

from worry about your 
future -if you live. 

INDEPENDENCE 

front want for your family- 
if yOu die. 

Ah adequate Endowment in 
theEq uitable gives you b6th. 

Opportunities for men of character to act as representatives 
1 ^ply to GAGE E.TARBELL, 2nd Vice President , 



For full information fill out this coupon or write 

The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States 

120 BROADWAY, NEW YORK Dept. No. 16 



Please send me information regarding an Endowment for $ , 

if issued at years of age. 

Name. 



6 4 



RECREATION. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

"For sport the lens is better than the gun." 

/ wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 



dressed Photographic Editor, Recreation, 
say, for instance : 

No. i is entitled • ■ . 



THE ANNUAL COMPETITION 
Recreation has conducted 8 amateur 
photographic competitions, all of which 
have been eminently successful. The 9th 
opens April 1st, 1904, and will close No- 
vember 30th, 1904. 

Following is a list of prizes to be 
awarded : 

First prize: A Long Focus Korona Camera, 
5x7, made by the Gundlach Optical Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., fitted with a Turner-Reich Anastig- 
mat Lens, and listed at $85. 

Second prize: A 4 x 5 Petite Century Camera, 
with Goerz Anastigmat Lens and Century Shutter, 
listed at $73. 

Third prize: A Royal Anastigmat Lens, 4x5, 
made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, N, Y.; 
listed at $36. 

Fourth prize: A Waterproof Wall Tent, 12 x 16, 
made by Abercrombie & Fitch, New York, and 
listed at $32. 

Fifth prize: An Al-Vista-Panoramic Camera, 
made by the Multiscope and Film Co., Burlington, 
Wis., and listed at $30. 

Sixth prize: A No. 3 Focusing Weno Hawk- 
eye Camera, made by the Blair Camera Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., and listed at $27.50. 

Seventh prize: A 12 x 12 Waterproof Wall 
Tent, listed at $16.30. 

Eighth prize : A Tourist Hawkeye Camera, 
4x5, and made by the Blair Camera Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., and listed at $15. 

Ninth prize: A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, made 
by the Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., and 
listed at $8. 

Tenth prize: A pair of High Grade Skates, 
made by Barney & Berry, Springfield, Mass., and 
listed at $6. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
a pair of chrome tanned leather driving or hunt- 
ing gloves made by the Luther Glove Co., and 
listed at $1.50. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
a Laughlin Fountain Pen, listed at $1. 

A special prize: A Goerz Binocular Field Glass, 
listed at $74.25, will be given for the best picture 
of a live wild animal. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures 
or groups of persons, or animals, repre- 
senting in a truthful manner shooting, fish- 
ing, amateur photography, bicycling, sail- 
ing or other form of outdoor or indoor 
sport or recreation. Awards to be made 
by 3 judges, none of whom shall be com- 
petitors. 

Conditions : Contestants must submit 2 
mounted prints, either silver, bromide, 
platinum or carbon, of each subject, which, 
as well as the negative, shall become the 
property of Recreation. Negatives not to 
be sent unless called for. 

In submitting pictures, please write sim- 
ply your full name and address on the back 
of each, and number such prints as you 
may send, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then in a letter ad- 



Made with a 

lens. 



camera. 



On a 

Printed on 



plate. 



paper. 



Length of exposure, 

Then add any further information you 
may deem of interest to the judges, or to 
other amateur photographers. Same as to 
Nos. 2, 3, etc. 

This is necessary in order to save post- 
age. In all cases where, more than the 
name and address of the sender and serial 
number of picture are written on the back 
of prints I am required to pay letter post- 
age here. I have paid as high as $2.50 on 
a single package of a dozen pictures, in ad- 
dition to that prepaid by the sender, on ac- 
count of too much writing on the prints. 

Any number of subjects may be sub- 
mitted. 

Pictures that may have been published 
elsewhere, or that may have been entered 
in any other competition, not available. No 
entry fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look 
at the camera. Occupy them in some other 
way. Many otherwise fine pictures have 
failed to win in the former competitions 
because the makers did not heed this warn- 
ing. 



DEVELOPING PAPERS. 

The more I work with developing papers 
the more I am convinced that there is no 
best kind or grade. In spite of all the skill 
one may exercise in exposing and develop- 
ing, and notwithstanding all the tricks and 
dodges one may employ to improve the plate 
after development, it is practically impos- 
sible for amateurs to produce negatives of 
a uniform quality. 

The professional portrait artist, working 
under the skylight, learns to know his light 
and the proper exposure, and his work can 
be even in quality ; but for the average 
amateur, this is an impossibility. To-day 
he goes out to secure some choice bits of 
landscape ; to-morrow it is the family cot 
or the new baby that is forced to face his 
deadly lens ; then, perhaps, his next plate 
will be used in copying a faded daguerro- 
type. Working thus, with all classes of sub- 
jects and under all conditions, his collec- 
tion of negatives can not but be as varied 
in quality as in subject. The manufacturers 
of developing paper realize that a variety 
of grades is needed, yet 9 out of 10 ama- 
teurs stick to one grade of paper as if it 
were the only one on the market. 

Many of my acquaintances are believers 
in the carbon grade, using it for all work, 
irrespective of the character or quality of 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



65 



the negative. ' It is needless to say that the 
results they obtain are not always of the 
highest class. When developing paper was 
first introduced I tried it, using the carbon 
grade. I gave it up in disgust, as the re- 
sulting prints were poor. I tried the paper 
at intervals for a year or 2, with indifferent 
success, until T happened to get hold of a 
package of quicker working paper, known 
as the portrait grade. From that time 
on I have used developing work almost 
exclusively for my ordinary paper, and 
have tried most of the brands on the mar- 
ket. Nearly all are good when rightly 
handled, but care is needed in working 
them if success is looked for. I keep on 
hand 4 or 5 grades of different speeds and 
surfaces, and there is always some one of 
these that is preeminently the best for use 
with a particular negative. 

To realize how many different effects are 
possible from one negative one must try 
it with different grades of paper. This I 
strongly advise the progressive amateur to 
do. Once he understands what an import- 
ant means for improving his work is thus 
placed in his hands, he will no longer be 
content to use one grade of paper for ah 
work, but will keep at hand a supply of the 
various grades, so he may test- each nega- 
tive as it is made and make his final print 
on the paper best suited to its character. 
C. M. Whitney, Bayonne, N. J. 



THE HYDROMETER TEST. 

The hydrometer used by photographers 
has a different scale from the standard 
hydrometers for taking the specific gravity 
of fluids as used by chemists, and is called 
the photographer's hydrometer or actino- 
meter. Whenever the directions for com- 
pounding any developing or other photo- 
graphic solution say "by hydrometer test," 
it is intended that this special photog- 
raphers' actinometer should be used and not 
the standard hydrometer. 

The actinometer scale indicates the num- 
ber of grains of silver nitrate to the ounce 
of water. For example, in a solution of 
silver nitrate 10 grains to one ounce of 
water, the actinometer would read 10. In 
the same solution the standard hydrometer 
would read 1.019. For ordinary purposes 
it is sufficiently accurate to count 2 points 
on the standard hydrometer scale for each 
point on the actinometer scale, if one wishes 
to find the relative value of a reading of one 
instrument on the other. For accurate 
readings the fluids to be tested should be 
at a temperature of 60 deg. F. The 
chief advantage of using the actinometer 
for making solutions is its accuracy. Solu- 
tions can always be made just alike, no 
matter whether the chemical, say sodium 



sulphite, for instance, is in crystals, dry 
anhydrous or granular form. It is not ne- 
cessary to change the quantities for the 
different forms as it is when we weigh 
them. Just keep adding the sulphite until 
the required reading on the scale is reached. 
Another advantage is the convenience of 
the actinometer and the quickness with 
which solution can be made. I buy my 
sodium sulphite and sodium carbonate in 
5-pound bottles,- getting the C. P. crystals, 
as the crystals dissolve better than the 
anhydrous form. As soon as I get a new 
supply I fill the bottles with water and add 
water as I use the solution ; so I always 
have a saturated solution on hand from 
which any strength of solution can be made 
in a few minutes by adding water. 

R. L. Wadhams, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Please compare the F system of stops 
with the universal. If the exposure was 
one second with the F system (largest stop) 
would the exposure be 2 seconds with the 
next succeeding stop and so on? 

Please explain the F system. Why is it 
different from the universal? 

H. E. Roberts, New Castle, Pa. 



There are in common use 2 systems of 
numbering stops, the F and the uniform. 
Some lens makers have systems of their 
own, but nearly all the lenses now use one 
or the other of these 2. The 2 systems 
compared are as follows : 

UNIFORM SYSTEM. 

No. 124 8 16 32 64 128 256 
F. f/4 f/5.6 f/8 f/11.3 f/16 f/22.6 J/32I7477/64 

F SYSTEM. 

For example, take F|8. This means the 
focal length of the lens divided by 8, but 
for convenience it is written F|8. In the 
uniform system each succeeding number is 
Yz the area of previous one and requires 
double the exposure. Beginning with No. 1, 
F|4 was chosen as a starting point. As the 
light that passes through a stop is propor- 
tionate to the area of the aperture and the 
areas of circles are proportionate to the 
squares of their diamaters it is easy to cal- 
culate the F value for any number of the 
uniform system. No. 1 is equal to FI4. To 
find the value of No. 2, square 4 — 16, 
then multiply by 2 — 32 and extract the 
square root = f 5.6; and so on for each 
succeeding F value. 

With lenses numbered on this basis 
knowing the exposure for any one stop the 
exposure for the next larger stop will be 
Yz and for the next smaller stop twice the 
known exposure. — Editor. 



66 



RECREATION. 



Will you kindly state in Recreation 
whether I can get satisfactory negatives un- 
der the following conditions : I have a No. 
3 F. P. Kodak, for films, without plate at- 
tachment. With this I wish to copy some 
very artistic engravings, 10x12 inches. A 
friend tells me to put the print on the 
wall, place the Kodak about 8 feet distant 
and draw out Kodak as far as it will ex- 
tend ; but I should like your opinion in the 
meantime. 

E. Worthington, Montreal, Can. 

ANSWER. 

To obtain good copies of the engravings 
you speak of with your F. P. Kodak No. 3, 
will require some careful experimenting. 
There are a number of details to be ob- 
served. 

Fasten the engraving on the wall so that 
it will be perfectly flat and smooth. Ar- 
range the lighting so it will be uniform 
over the whole picture. Side light and top 
light should be screened off, as they inten- 
sify any grain or roughness of the engrav- 
ing. Set your camera on a level with the 
center of the engraving. See that the plane 
of the film is absolutely parallel to the pic- 
ture to be copied. To focus, remove the 
back of your Kodak and fasten a strip of 
paraffined paper, without folds or creases, 
across the rollers in the same position the 
film will occupy. Focus on this paper the 
same as on the ground glass of an ordi- 
nary camera. As the focusing must be 
sharp, use a magnifying glass. If you pre- 
fer you can have a piece of ground glass 
cut to fit in the back of the camera instead 
of the paper and hold it there by rubber 
bands, but it is more difficult to fix the 
glass in the proper plane than it is the 
paraffined paper. After having focused 
properly, remove the paper or glass, put 
in a film and make your exposures. Of 
course the camera should not be moved in 
the least between the focusing and the ex- 
posure. To get detail and sharpness stop 
the 1 jns down small and give full exposure. 
The development should be slow and not 
forced in the least, in order to get detail 
and clearness without choking. — Editor. 



During my vacation last summer I de- 
cided to develop some plates as soon as 
they were exposed, instead of waiting until 
the end of my vacation to do the work. 
Being away from home this was inconven- 
ient, but I finally rigged up a place and 
procured the necessary chemicals. The 
weather was warm and one or 2 trials 
showed that before the various manipula- 
tions could be performed the gelatine film 
became decidedly soft. Of course the use 
of alum at once suggested itself, so I added 



a quantity to the hypo bath. This was ef- 
ficient in hardening the film sufficiently, 
but when I gave the negatives a careful 
examination after washing, I found that 
they were mottled and covered with patches 
of uneven density, and, in fact, useless 
for printing. 

I had developed several dozen plates be- 
fore I discovered the trouble, and these ex- 
posures, of course, should have been dupli- 
cated, though in several instances this was 
impossible. 

Though it is possible to use a fixing 
bottle containing alum without this mottling, 
as I have proved, still it would appear 
safer to use the alum as a separate bath 
after the plate is fixed and washed ; or, what 
is much more convenient, use one of the 
numerous fixing baths which contain in 
addition to hypo, sulphite of soda, sulphur- 
ic acid and chrome alum. When properly 
prepared a fixing bath of this kind is effi- 
cient in hardening the gelatine. It lasts a 
long time without renewal, though there is 
no economy in overworking it.- Lastly, it 
works evenly on the film, never leaving 
patches of uneven density. 

C. M. Whitney, Bayonne, N. J. 



WARMING THE DEVELOPER. 

The advantage of warming developer to 
get out detail in under exposed plates has 
lately been attracting notice. In one case a 
jet of hot air is strongly advocated, this 
being turned on to the particular spot where 
detail hangs back most. A jet of steam 
from a kettle is also suggested, but great 
care would have to be exercised in its use 
for fear of melting the gelatine film, espe- 
cially when using metol, which has not the 
tanning and hardening effect of pyrogallic 
acid. Good as the 2 methods undoubtedly 
are in expert hands, a still better plan 
for the ordinary amateur is to dilute the de- 
veloper slightly with hot soft water, so that, 
the glass feels comfortably warm to the 
hand. The effect of the developer on the 
film will be best appreciated if one plate of 
the same exposure is developed with cold 
solution, and one with the warm liquid. In 
the first case details will come up in a man- 
ner little short of marvelous, while the 
other will hang back an uncomfortably long 
time, and finally come up hard and black, 
short of detail and with a decided tendency 
to fog. Another good way is to place the 
developing dish in a tray a size larger, full 
of common hard water just so hot that the 
finger can be placed in it, and then rock the 
2 trays steadily, adding fresh hot water as 
the heat evaporates. This plan is to be pre- 
ferred when hot soft water is not easily ob- 
tainable. — The Queen. 



RECREATION. 



kvii 





PREMO 
FILM 

packs" 



fc 



All the convenience of film with the 
advantage of focusing on ground glass. 

A Premo Film Pack Adapter will 

convert your 2% x 4/4 > 4 x 5 or 5 x 7 
Premo into a film camera which loads 
in daylight in 3 seconds with the 1 2 
exposures Film Pack. 



ASK THE DEALER 

i%. x4^ 4x5 5x7 

Premo Film Pack Adapter $1.00 $1.50 $2.50 
Premo Film Pack (12 exposures) .70 .90 1.60 

Premo Catalogue free at the dealers' or by mail. 

Mention Recreation. 



ROCHESTER OPTICAL CO 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 





XV111 



RECREATION. 




IT WILL PAY YOU TO KNOW US 




Because we sell 

CAMERA 
LENSES 

&nd 

Sup pi ie s 

cheaper than any 
other hoiise 

For Instance : 



Korona Cameras at 40f° Discount 

On exchanged Kodaks, Century, Premo and other 
makes, and on all makes of LENSES, we save you from 
25$ to 50% of manufacturers' price. 

Get our latest BARGAIN LIST and compare prices 
with those of others,, 

We can make your plate camera a film one for $1.50. 

We will exchange your old outfit for a new one. 
Write us about it. 

Films developed at 5c. per roll. 8/10 Bromide en- 
largements, 18c. 

NaLtionaJ Specialty Co. 

49 West 28th Street 
New York City Near Broadway 



I wish to thank you for the No. 4 Bristol 
steel rod which you sent to me as a pre- 
mium. This, with a No. 11 and a No. 15 
rod previously purchased, gives me a good 
assortment, and everyone knows that the 
Bristol delivers the goods. I shall soon 
send you another club and call for another 
Bristol. 

A. E. Chase, Brunswick, Me. 



■The Harrington & Richardson shot gun 
you sent me as a premium is a fine shooter 
and in every way better than I expected, 
l W. Malcolm, Moline, 111. 



Percy Staylate — Father thinks it would 
be a good thing if I should travel. 

Miss De Sharp — I think so, too. How 
soon do you intend to start? — Chicago 
News. 

LANTERN SLIDES COLORED 
SKILLFULLY AND ARTISTICALLY 

FOR 

Lecturers, Teachers and others 



I refer by permission to the Editor of Recreation 



MRS. C. B. SMITH 

The Ansonia, 74th St., & Broadway, 
New York City. 

Lest you forget, in a fit of aberration, I say 

IT AGAIN, PLEASE MENTION RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



xix 



A MUSICAL TRIUMPH. 

(Recent reports from somewhere in New 
England state that caterpillars have been 
killed by the playing of a brass band. Peo- 
ple who have heard brass bands of the vil- 
lage variety will have little difficulty in 
crediting the reports.) 

"Music has charms to soothe the savage 
breast," 
At least so we have often heard it said ; 
And yet for soothing savages out West 
We always had a preference for lead ; 
We had a notion, it must be confessed, 
A savage is most soothing when he's 
dead; 
Which same is why we never tried to fill 

him 
With harmony, but figured how to kill him. 

Yet this does not disprove the adage ; for 
If we had tried on him a modern chorus 
We might have saved the shedding of his 
gore 
And changed to wholesome dread the 
hate he bore us. 
He would have found our music worse 
than war . 
And to escape he would have fled before 
us. 
By taking thus an opera along 
We might have had the country for a song. 

"Music has charms." 'Tis wonderful the 
sway 
That it has held o'er warriors, bards, and 
sages. 
Across the past wc hear it far away, 

Its sweet strains wafted down from dis- 
tant ages. 
Yet it has shown a greater power to-day 
Than has been chronicled in history's 
pages. 
The erstwhile charmer now becomes a 

killer 
And knocks the tar out of the caterpillar. 

The forest waltzed when Orpheus played 
his lute ; 
The devils, charmed, forgot their devil- 
hood. 
When Pan upon his pipes began to toot, 
There fell a panic through the fearsome 
wood. 
Such skill had the Pied Piper with his flute 

That even tats the music understood. 
Our players show a magic still more fetch- 
ing. 
The worms succumb unto its spell bewitch- 
ing. 
J. A. Edgerton in New York Times. 



The Syracuse gun, my premium for a club 
of subscribers, is much better than I ex- 
pected. C. W. Booth, Lowell, Mich. 



SO METHINO **JE TW 

Williams' Patent Film Printing Frame- Print your 

films without cutting them apart. Save time and trouble. 
Every amateur using films should have one. Send stamp for 
illustrated circulars. Agents wanted. Address 

E R. WILLIAMS <& CO., Downers Grove, III. 




The 1904 Catalogue is a photographic news letter, from Rochester, 
the Home of the Kodak. Free at the dealers or by mail. 



xx RECREATION. 



DO YOU WANT A 

FOLDING 
CANVAS BOAT? 



If So, Send Me 



25 Yearly Subscriptions to 

RECREATION 

AND I WILL SEND YOU 

A 14 ft. King Folding Canvas Boat 

LISTED AT $48 



capable of carrying 2 men and an ordinary camp outfit. There 
are thousands of these boats in use, and nearly every man who is 
using one of them praises it on every occasion. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing will be 
furnished on application. 

Address 23 West 24th St., New York 



i 



RECREATION. 



xxi 




T 



HE Official Photo- 
graphs of the St. 
Louis Exposition which 
you see reproduced in the various magazines and news- 
papers are all made with the Goerz lens. 

The Official Photographers of the St. Louis Fair have 
all adopted the Goerz lens to the exclusion of all others. 

In block 75 of the Liberal Arts Building the Goerz 
Optical Works show their automatic process of grinding 
and polishing these famous lenses in operation. 

Main Offices, Berlin-Friedenaw, Germany. 
Branch Offices, 4 and 5 Holborn Circus, London, England. 21 Rue de V Entrepot, Paris. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

Room 27, 52 E. Union Square, New York City. 



The Ithaca gun was received promptly, 
and am highly pleased with same. It is a 
durable, strong shooting gun, and, no doubt, 
the best on the market at the price. I will 
always have a good word for Recreation 
and the Ithaca. 

Chas. L. Selleck, Mankato, Minn. 



I can give you a position in my bank, 
but you will have to wait for promotion 
until somebody dies or resigns." 

"Don't you ever have any defaulters?" 
— Town Topics. 

Recreation beats any sportsmen's paper 
I ever saw. 

Everett E. Johnson, Lewiston, Me. 



OIL PORTRAITS ON APPROVAL 

If you will send me a photo of yourself or a 
friend and state color of hair, eyes and com- 
plexion, I will paint and send you on approva 
an oil or pastel portrait, miniature or life size. 
Canvas, 6x8 or 8xio inches, $10 
Canvas 10x12 or 12x14 inches, $15 
Three-quarters life size, - - $25 
Full life size, ------ $35 

Z. EMMONS, 58 West 104tK Street 

Reference: Mr. G. O. Shields. New York 




Eye Glasses into Spectacles. Spectacles into Eye Glasses 

rkTS „ r , BE PROTECTED ! 

* r RR c f;i K ™ } ' OSE YOUK GLASSES I* EXERCISE. WIND AND STORM 

P-- • xt. 1 attached by anyone Send thickness of lens when ordering by mail 

ESrSrf^Ji 80 ^; £l & LEMBK R 75 Den a t ^V W .S ™5? ft * *&' S ° Hd GoW ^' 50 a P air ' 

4 u **-l « LbMBKB, Dept.C, I W. 42d St. 21 Union Sq., New York Send for Circular 



xxii RECREATION. 




LILILP 



IS TIRED NATURE 5 
SWEET RESTORER 

After a hard day's tramp, you must have 

A Good Night's Rest 

in order to fit you for the next day's work. Better to sleep 
on a good bed without your dinner, than sip at a banquet and 
then sleep on the cold, hard, wet ground. You can get 

A Recreation 
Camp flattress 

of rubber, with valve for inflating, made by the Pneumatic Mattress 
Co., and listed at $18. 

For 10 Yearly Subscriptions to 
RECREATION 



Send for Sample Copies 
Address RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, New York. 



RECREATION. 



xxm 



The Chautauqua County Fish and Game 
Club bought last year about 30 ring-neck 
pheasants and distributed them in different 
sections of the country. It is doubtful if 
many of the birds liberated survived the 
severe winter. 

I noticed that at the meeting of the New 
York League at Syracuse in December 
last, it was voted to recommend the cut- 
ting off of 15 days from the latter part of 
the present open season for deer. The 
members of our club, some of whom visit 
the Adirondacks every fall, object to any 
shortening of the open season in the month 
of November, as that is the time when the 
game is at its best and when it can be 
transported without risk of spoiling. It 
must be recollected that 9-10 of the deer 
killed in September are got by floating for 
them. If too many are being killed as the 
law now stands, limit the number to one 
deer for each hunter, as that is all we 
outsiders are allowed to take on our jour- 
ney home at present. 

T. J. F., Jamestown, N. Y. 



The silver in the sailing cloud, 
The gold that's in the tulip — 

All these are naught to me ; I want 
The mint that's in the julep. 

— N. Y. Times. 



PUT your MONEY 



IN the leMS 

WHEN BUYING A CAMERA 

Bausch ® Lomb 




WITH THE VOLUTE SHUTTER docs 
better work in every class of photography than the 

lenses ordinarily supplied with cameras 

Our Booklet tells why. 

BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO. 

^Rochester, Tf. V. 

New York lioston Chicago 





COMBINATION 

HAWK=EYE 



A New Film Camera which 
allows the operator to focus 
on ground glass. 

May also be used with glass plates. 

Fitted with Extra Rapid Rectilinear lens, B. & L. 
Automatic Shutter, rising and falling front con- 
trolled by rack and pinion. 

No. 3 Combination HawK=Eye, pictures Z% x 4#, 
equipped for film and plates, = - $27.50 

BLAIR CAMERA COMPANY, 




Send far Catalogue. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



XXIV 



RECREATION. 



THE NERVE OF A TENDERFOOT. 

E. L. HOWE. 

I passed the summer of 1902 in the Cas- 
cade mountains in the company of Jack 
Purely, who came to me through Recrea- 
tion. Purdy was about 40 years of age, 
strictly city bred, and had never fired a 
gun more than half a dozen times in his 
life ; but he proved to be one of those rare 
tenderfeet who can adapt themselves to 
any circumstances. He brought with him 
a new 30-30 rifle and after a few days' 
practice he became proficient with the 
little gun, making good scores at target 
practice. 

We left Creswell, Oregon, July 16th, 
journeying by easy stages up the middle 
fork of the Willamette. We took 4 horses, 
2 of which we rode, the others being 
packed with an ample supply of provisions. 
The 18th of July we reached a place on the 
river called Campers' Flat, where we re-, 
mained several days. The third day at this 
camp we crossed the river to a deer lick 
and took our position behind a huge log. 
In about an hour 2 deer came in 
sight, one of which proved to be a large 
buck. The deer advanced within 50 yards 
when the buck stopped, offering a broad- 
side shot. I expected to see Purdy tremb- 
ling with excitement, but he was as cool 
as when shooting at a mark; and when at 
the crack of his rifle the buck fell, shot, as 
we afterward found, through both shoul- 
ders, Purdy seemed as free from buck 
ague as an old hunter. 

We could easily have se'eured the other 
deer had we wished, but as we were out 
for sport and not for butchery we let her 
go. 

We made our permanent camp on the 
North fork of the Umpqua river, to the 
Southwest of Cowhorn peak, which is a 
notable landmark in the range. One 
morning while we were hunting together 
about a mile from camp, we discovered a 
large bear, evidently a grizzly, about 150 
yards from us on the opposite hillside. He 
did not discover us until we had opened 
fire on him. At least one of our first shots 
took effect, for, as the bear started to run, 
we could see that he was wounded. One 
of his hind legs dragged as if it was 
broken. In spite of his wound he ran 
like the wind and soon disappeared in a 
small thicket. Each of us feathered in 6 
or 8 shots apiece before he reached cover, 
but could not stop him. On crossing to 
where the bear was first discovered we 
found a plain trail of blood. Purdy was 
for following the trail into the brush, but 

1 persuaded him not to, telling him it 
might be the same as committing suicide. 
We found, however, on making a circuit 
of the thicket, that the bear had passed 
through the thicket. We followed the trail 

2 or 3 hours until it entered a small thicket 
of greasewood brush. There we separated, 
Purdy going to the right while I went to 
the left. We had nearly come together again 
where the trail entered the brush, when 1 



saw my companion throw his rifle to his 
shoulder. At the same instant the bear 
broke cover, charging directly on Purdy. 
Jack stood pat, and fired as fast as he 
could work the lever of his rifle, but with- 
out apparent effect. The bear passed with- 
in 20 yards of me and I fired no less than 
3 shots, point blank, without checking his 
speed in the least. At the same time I 
shouted, 

"Run ! Jack, run ! For God's sake, run !" 
but Jack did not run until the bear was 
within 6 or 8 feet, and he afterward said 
he would not have started then but that 
his gun was empty.. As I raised my gun 
for the 4th shot it seemed to me that no 
power on earth could save Purdy, but I 
drew full and fair on the head of the 
bear just at the butt of his ear. At the 
crack of the heavy 45-90 the animal col- 
lapsed like a wet rag, the bullet crushing 
the whole top of the skull. Flad the shot 
been delayed a fraction of a second, the 
life of my friend would have been snuffed 
out like a candle, for at the instant I 
fired the bear made one of those terrible 
overhand swings, barely missing Purdy's 
head, and literally tearing the coat from 
his back. I have seen men exposed to ex- 
treme peril, but I never before saw a man 
so near death. 

The most singular part of the affair, to 
me, was that Purdy did not seem to rea- 
lize the danger through which he had 
passed. He hardly changed color, while I 
was so weak and sick after it was all over 
that I could hardly stand. I have never 
been able to determine whether Purdy was 
in ignorance of his great peril or whether 
it was a matter of sheer nerve on his part. 

The skin of the bear was in poor condi- 
tion, owing to the season of the year, so 
we did not preserve it. We merely re- 
moved the largest claws, which Purdy took 
East with him. 

We remained at that camp about 2 weeks 
before returning to the valley, when Purdy 
took his departure home well pleased with 
his trip. 



RAIN AFTER DROUGHT. 

EDITH L. SMITH. ■ 

The cloud is a harp in the sky, and a song 
Drips sweet on the strings of the rain, 

To the Earth lying parched and dry, "Do 
not mourn, 
Resurrection I bring you again. 

"For I am the music of Birth, and I come 
After Death that goes silenced and bare, 

Looking down T see verdure of Earth, faint 
and numb, 
And I weep o'er her whitened hair. 

"Drip fast my voice! O men hark, it is I. 

Bid you turn to your ploughs at hand — 
Perfume of sod, and song of swift lark, rise 
on high ! 

I bring life to a thirsty land." 



RECREATION. 



XXV 




First Discovery 
of Coffee 



About 15 centuries ago an Arab herder of 
goats driving the flock through some new 
country was alarmed at the antics of the ani- 
mals and thought they were "possessed of the 
devil." 

Each day the same thing occured after the 
goats had eaten of a certain kind of berry. The 
goatherd thought he would eat a few to try the 
effect. 

That was the discovery of coffee. 

Arabs learned to brown the berries and boil 
them, drinking the liquor which was then and 
now recognized as a stimulant with direct action 
on the heart, and of course the reaction and de- 
pression later on. 

Coffee sets up a partial congestion of the liver 
in many people as shown by the coated tongue, 
yellow skin and general lethargy. If continued, 
fixed and chronic disease sets up in some organs 
most easily affected. Some people are strong 
enough in digestion to get along well with coffee 
for years, but great numbers are not. 

It is often stated by physicians that coffee is 
the one greatest of all causes of disease to ™ 

Americans. .^ \ \~>^ 

Anyone can easily prove whether it be coffee 
that causes the periodical headaches, sick stomach, bowel troubles, weak heart, kidney com- 
plaint, weak eyes, neuralgia, rheumatism or nervous prostration. 

Simply leave it off entirely for ten days and that's easy when you can have a piping hot rich 
cup of POSTUM with the coffee color and a crisp coffee snap (if well made according to the 
directions on the package.) 

If you find, in a day or two, that you are getting better, that's your cue, follow it straight 
back to health, comfort and the power to do things. 



POSTUM FOOD COFFEE, 10 days, -'There's ©l Reason." 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



CANOEING DOWN THE KENTUCKY. 

HENRY J. BROWN. 

"Have you seen 2 tramps pushing an In- 
jun canoe down this river painted green?" 

"No," said the bridge watchman ; and I 
knew he knew, though I think the paint 
puzzled him. 

This was at Frankfort-on-the-Kentucky, 
and I said tramps, because that was my 
guess. When they left Louisville for 
Beattyville both were spick and span in 
ducks and blazers, the ducks being white 
and beautifully creased. 

When you are waiting to meet friends 
who, some 5 days before, have started from 
200 miles upstream to meet you at a des- 
ignated spot, and you find them not, yon 
want something to amuse you while you 
wait. I went to the express office, took 
out my canvasback canoe and found a 
dozen holes punched in her skin. 

A big lump of pitch, some light canvas, 
a tinner's firepot, his soldering iron, a quan- 
tity of patience, a stock of perseverance, a 
guard on the tongue when skin of hand 
and skin of canoe graft together in the 
ironing process, and lo ! time flies. 

I said to the accommodating bridgeman, 
"Please inform those folks, when they 
come, that the person they expected to meet 
here has dropped down the river and will 
wait for them at the first good camp ground 
below the locks. If they should not rec- 
ognize a good camp ground, that is their 
misfortune and they will get over it. They 
are out cruising and must learn these little 
things. The parties are of disreputable ap- 
pearance and it has rained on them a week. 
Their whiskers have that much of a start. 
By these signs you shall know them." 

He said he would, and dingy but beauti- 
fully situated Frankfort receded behind one 
of the lovely hills that surround her. At 
the locks I found darkness and a roar of 
waters over the dam which so appealed to 
my imagination and charity that I did not 
disturb the lockman. In the morning, when 
I had straightened out the kinks in a lanky 
anatomy, I determined not again to bivouac 
in the canoe. This first camp was named 
Camp Cramp. 

Being new to locks and keepers, though 
old to cruising, I asked a boy if they would 
open to such a small craft as mine. 

"Yes," said the boy, "they've got to open 

even to a d chunk" ; and I was left 

with a doubt as to whether he should be 
chastised by the lockman or me. 

Between the locks I did what every nov- 
ice is likely to do: tied up to the ladder and 
climbed out to help the keeper open the 
sluices. It was due to his thoughtful 
warning that I saved my dufiie from drop- 
ping into the canal from the canoe suspend- 
ed 15 feet from the water. At his word I 
reached ship just in time to cast off and 
drop with the sinking water. One is not 
likely to forget the first locking through. 

"Steamboat Holler" the natives call it. 
The river sweeps in a graceful curve with- 



in the crescent of a high wooded ridge. 
There I camped and decided to await my 
friends. Hummingbird camp it became, 
because I stopped to watch one of the little 
fellows, a rubythroat, as he dangled about 
a trumpet vine. I found other amusements 
besides watching Rubythroat, for the rocks 
made nice, soft pillows, and bolstered up 
the bed and fitted cosily into the semblance 
of a Dutch oven. Also they served to tie 
the canoe to ; also to bark the shins on. 
A passing fisherman called, 

"Looks like rain. Reckon you'll get wet, 
stranger, if you stay in that washout. 
That's where the water comes down from 
the mountain. Them rocks in your house 
comes down with the water." 

Happily it did not rain, and I waited for 
the long-deferred meeting with the voy- 
agers from upriver. Here is how they de- 
scribe it : 

"We saw a white patch away off at the 
foot of the mountain and wondered if that 
was he. We paddled and paddled and pad- 
dled. After so long a time the white patch 
grew, and at a long last it became a tent. 
The blue streak at the water's edge became 
a canoe ; and after some more paddling we 
saw him, lying at ease under the fly of his 
tent, smoking his pipe and reading a maga- 
zine, b'gosh ! We forgave him when we 
saw the steam of his kettle and smelt the 
contents of the same, for we had paddled 
and wearied since daylight and it was now 
high noon." 

Here is the way I saw it : 

I was enjoying myself, ever and anon 
gazing out to the horizon, for it was high 
time a vessel should show in the offing. 
At last a speck was discerned on the 
waters, which became after a time animated 
and appeared a tiny scissors, upright and 
snipping away at the surface of the river 
with regular, steady motion. The scissors 
grew gradually into 2 veritable Indians in 
a birch bark canoe. I wondered if I were 
not Simon Kenton or Daniel Boone, and 
Was reaching for my trusty rifle when I 
remembered it was only a modern breech 
loading scatter gun. The Indians then re- 
solved themselves into 2 of the toughest 
looking pirates that ever sailed the Spanish 
main ; but as they neared my encampment 
I learned by certain familiar signs and ges- 
tures and language that they were of my 
race, and indeed of my own kindred; 
whereupon we foregathered. 



Duck shooting in this neighborhood is 
in the hands of a gun club that controls 
the preserves. There are plenty of market 
hunters and game hogs here, too. Geese 
are much scarcer and more wary than they 
were 10 years ago. Trout fishing in the 
mountains of the Sacramento valley is an 
uncertain proposition, while deer are 
scarcer than hen's teeth except far back 
in the Coast range. We need more pro- 
tection here. You are doing good work 
and I wish you all possible success. 

Frank G. Smith, Chico, Cal 



RECREATION. 




WISDOM IN THE MOUTH OF BABES. 



SHMDDEDWM 



BISCUIT and 
TRISCUIT 



are toothsome: foods. 



The use of Shredded Whole Wheat makes 
strong, sound teeth. The reasons for this are : 

1 — that Whole Wheat contains the mineral 
matter (phosphates) and all other food properties 
required to build perfect teeth. The phosphates 
are found next to the outside coat of the wheat 
and are removed in the milling of white flour; 

2 — that Shredded Wheat is crisp and firm, re- 
quiring thorough mastication, thereby giving the 
teeth the natural exercise necessary for their 
normal development; 

3 — that Shredded Wheat, being naturally short 
and porous, contains no greases or artificial 
"shortening" or chemicals of any kind to make 
it "light." These substances tend to form a 
coating on the teeth* and create a source of decay. 



Give those you love the richest of all heritages 
Sound Teeth and Health* 

Among the many letters we have received from 
dentists we publish the following : 

"1 am interested in inducing people to get more of the 
phosphates into their bones. I am a dentist, seventy years 
old, and I have seen so many young people with teeth almost 
as soft as chalk, simply structures of nothing, comparatively 
speaking. I wish that people could be educated, could learn 
what to eat. I think Shredded Wheat comes the nearest of 
anything toa perfect food." Dr. (name upon request.) 

Shredded Whole Wheat Biscuit is the standard 
all-day cereal and may be served with milk or 
cream or in combination with fruits, preserves or 
vegetables. 

Triscuit, the New Toast, is used as bread, 
toast, crackers or wafers. Try Triscuit spread 
with butter or cheese. 



Write for our ilustrated cook book The Vital Question"— sent FREE. 

The Natural Food Company, iSEMfSSSL Niagara Falls, New York. 



XXV111 



RECREATION. 



The Truth 

Can be told about 

Great 

Western 

Champagne 

—the Standard of 
American Wines 

There is nothing to conceal in 
its production. It is Pure 
Grape Juice, fermented and 
aged to exact perfection for 
healthfulness, possessing the 
bouquet and flavor that con- 
noisseurs desire. 

''Of the six American 
Champagnes exhibit- 
ed at the Paris expo- 
sition of 1900, the 
GREAT WESTERN 
we^s the only one 
that received a GOLD 
MEDAL." 

Pleasant Valley Wine Co. 

Sole Makers, Rheims, N. Y. 

Sold by respectable wine dealers everywhere 




Used by the ROYAL FAMILIES and 
SWART HOTELS throughout Europe 



EREBOS 

TABLE SALT 
NOURISHES 

The Daintiest, Driest Salt for 
table or kitchen. Packed in tins 
it is handy in camp, and NEVEB 
CAKES in any atmosphere. Con- 
tains wheat phosphates, restoring 
the yital salts lost in cooking:. 



Never 
Cakes 



Send for sample, enough for the family, naming your grocer 
"CEBEflOSt" 78 HUDSON STREET, NEW YORK 



mm 



TBI 



**9 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 





FOUNTAIN 
PEN 

Guaranteed Finest 
Grade 14k. 

SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 

RECREATION 



g as an advertising medium 
we offer your choice of 



FOUNTAIN 



,wtv! vJ 



These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles 
For Only 



Mm 



$1.00 

M> Postpaid 
l to any 

Address 

(By registered mail, 8c. extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. geld pen, 
any flexibility desired — 
in feeding device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY 
GOLD HOUNTED for 

presentation purposes, 
51.00 extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find 
it as represented, fully 
as fine a value as you 
can secure for three times 
the price in any other 
make, if not entirely sat- 
isfactory in every respect, j 
return it and we will send \ 
you $i.io for it, the extra 
ioc. is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
Pen — (Not one customer 
in 5,000 has asked for his 
money back.) 

Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder sent 
free of charge with each Pen 

ADDRESS'; 

Laughlin Hfg. Co. 

424 GrlBwold St.. PETROIT.MIGH, 



RECREATION. 



:xxix 



THEY ALL KNEW HOW. 

When Cleopatra, wise old girl, 
Got gay one night and drank a pearl, 
All frugal folk cried out, "For shame!" 
But marveled at her just the same, 
And she was right and she was wise 
To thus get in and advertise. 

When Cheops made his subjects bid 
On contracts for a pyramid, 
He got a tomb well worth a king, 
Though not a very useful thing, 
But he was right and he was wise 
To thus get in and advertise. 

When old Diogenes began 
Pot hunting for an honest man 
His chances for success were slim; 
But folks began discussing him — 
And he was right and he was wise 
To thus get in and advertise. 

When Dr. Johnson made a spree 
Of forty-seven cups of tea 
He surely showed his savoir faire 
By having Mr. Boswell there; 
And he was right and he was wise 
To thus get in and advertise. 

'Tis sad, but it is true, the same, 
That those who fill the Book of Fame 
Have left their records, more or less, 
Through some tremendous foolishness ; 
Yet they were right and they were wise 
To thus get in and advertise. 

Blame not the actress out of funds 
Who plans to lose her diamonds, 
Blame not the millionaire who capers 
To get his actions in the papers ; 
They've little to immortalize, 
But they at least can advertise. 

— Wallace Irwin in Life. 



I received the Marble axe and Luther 
gloves as premium for subscriptions to your 
magazine. After giving both a trial during 
a 10 days' hunting trip I find them far more 
serviceable than I should have expected. 
W. E. White, Citronville, Ala. 



The Webber hand knit shooting jacket 
which you ordered for me arrived the other 
day. I must express my thanks for your 
liberality in sending such a valuable pre- 
mium. 

H. S. Hill, Washington, D. C 



"Has the baby had the measles yet, Mr. 
Popps ?" 

u Sh-sh ! Don't speak so loud. Whenever 
he hears anything mentioned that he hasn't 
got he cries for it." — Comic Cuts. 



I thank you for the Bristol rod. It is 
first class in every particular, 
- W, H, Johnson, Dayton, 0> 



The Beer 
of Qualit) 




"Ike Top-Notch of 
Scientific Brewing 



.s reac 



hed l 



m 



Pabst 

Blue Ribbon 

the Beer of Quality. Medals con- 
ferred by leading governments of the 
-world confirm this fact. The fame 
of Pabst, with his sixty years of 
study and experience, is behind it. A 
thousand master-minds have contributed 
to its perfection. The Pabst malting 
process is the highest a#amment m this 
art. c Ike barley and the hops are the 
choicest grown, and the beer is brewed 
in the cleanest brewery m the "world, 
making it a palatable and delicious 
product of the most perfect brew. 
'The name Pabst on every bottle stands 
for purity and maturity. 

The Beer 
of Quality 




XXX 



RECREATION 



Uiiiilil! 



i Sinfile? Barrel Slot Gi 



This Exquisite 

Cut-Glass 

Comport or 

Bon-Bon 

Dish 

Illustrating our way 
of doing things 
For full particulars write for 
Deautiful picture catalog No. 
14 U, of more than a thousand 
articles suitable for presents. 

<% less than elsewhere" 

W.2ist & W.22d Sts. 

Near Sixth Ave. 

New York 



Do you want a Good, Reliable, 
Substantial, Well Made 



[Buy Chind and Glass Right 



imPIANOTIST 

Invisible Piano Player 




Endorsed by 
Soxisa, 
He^mbourg, 
Pug no, 
Adeline^ 

Patti. 



Write to-day 
for beautiful 
illustrated 
catalog "R," 
for prices, 
etc. 



No country home or summer camp should be 
without one. It helps to pass the evenings when 
the outdoor pleasures are over. It takes no extra 
sp-.ce as all other clumsy cabinet players do. No 
la .orious pumping, so easy a child can play it. 

The Pianotist can be attached to any piano and 
can be played by foot treadle, electricity or both. 

Pi©Li\otist Company 



123 Fifth Ave., New York 



London 



Berlin 



Pa.ris 



If SO) send me 

5IYEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

and I will send you an Acme, 
listed at $8, as a premium 

It is made by the DA VENPORTARMS . 
CO., and this means it is made of good 
material and that only good workmanship 
is put on it. 

This is one of the many remarkable op- 
portunities RECREATION is offering to 
men and boys to fit themselves out com- 
pletely for shooting and fishing. 

Sample Copies for Use in Canvassing 
Furnished on Application. 

Address 

RECREATION 

23 W. 24th St, New York Gty. 



Jacob Zimmerman is a resident of the fa- 
mous Sugar valley, once named by Dr. 
Rorthrock, State Forestry Commissioner, 
as the best grouse hunting country in the 
State. Since then the grounds have been 
hunted to death, and last season compara- 
tively few birds were to be found, although 
one party which I accompanied killed about 
24 in 2 days. Four years ago, Dr. Housel, 
of Watsontown, made the best record to 
my knowledge in the Sugar valley section, 
killing 8 grouse in 9 shots. 

Thousands of birds have been killed in the 
last 5 years in that section, and it is com- 
mon rumor that certain persons, residents 
of the valley, have caught an equally large 
number in snares. The result is the pres- 
ent scarcity. 

The Zimmerman farm is at the East end 
of Sugar valley, and has been for 30 or more 
years a favorite headquarters for deer 
hunters. Frequently during the open season 
as many as 30 hunters are entertained at 
his cosy place. Within 6 miles of Zimmer- 
man's 23 deer were killed last season, the 
largest number killed in one season in 25 
years. The strict game laws, especially the 
prohibition of hunting with dogs, is cred- 
ited with causing an increase of the game. 
L. C. Fosnot, Watsontown, Pa. 



The Syracuse hammerless came promptly 
to hand. It is an excellent shooter and a 
most generous premium. 

L. J. Mountz, Williamsville, 111. 



RECREATION. 




Would you sleep on a Mattress stuffed with human hair, gathered from many heads any- 
where, everywhere— even though a doctor's certificate that each person was well and healthy 
accompanied same? ■ 

Does it not conjure visions that are most unpleasant ? The horror of disease, the danger of 
contagion? And yet, consider how much more repulsive is the idea of mattresses stuffed with 
horse hair— impure animal hair from tropical countries where malignant diseases abound. The 

Ostermoor Mattress, $15. 

contains no animal fibre and is absolutely sweet, pure and clean. Not "stuffed" like hair, but 
"built" in eight layers of light, airy, interlacing, fibrous Ostermoor sheets of everlasting 
softness, and enclosed within the tick by hand. 

The Ostermoor Mattress is better than hair in every possible way, softer, purer, cleaner, 
and far more elastic— besides being dust-proof, germ-proof, vermin-proof, water-proof, and practi- 
cally un-wear-out-able— first cost is last and only cost; the Ostermoor never requires remaking. 



STANDARD SIZES AND PRICES : 

2 feet 6 incheB wide, . 25 lbs., . . $8.35 

3 feet wide, ... 30 lbs., 

3 feet 6 inches wide, . 35 lbs., 

4 feet wide, ... 40 lbs., 
4 feet 6 inches wide, . 45 lbs., 

EXPRESS CHARGES PREPAID. 
In two parts, so cents extra. Special sizes at special prices. 




30 Nights* Free Trial 

Sleep on the "Ostermoor" thirty nights free and 
if it is not even all you have hoped for, if you 
don't believe it to be the equal in cleanliness, dura- 
bility and comfort of any $50. hair mattress ever 
made, you can get your money back by return 
mail — "no questions asked." 

OUR 136-PAGE BOOK IS FREE 

Mailed on postal card request. "The Test of Time" is printed in two colors, contains 250 
beautiful illustrations, heaviest plate paper. Probably the most expensive book issued for 
advertising purposes. May we send it to you ? 

Look Out ! Dealers are trying- to sell the "just-as-good" kind. Ask to see the name "Ostermoor" and our trade- 
mark label sewn on the end. Show them you can't and won't be fooled. "It must be Ostermoor.'" Mattresses 
expressed, prepaid by us, same day check is received. Estimates on cushions and samples of coverings by return mail. 

OSTERMOOR & COMPANY, 114 Elizabeth Street. New York 

Canadian Ag-ency: The Alaska Feather and Down Co., Ltd., Montreal. 



": M ^M&y ''■' 



,^%tlP5p| 



.--;;'; 









^S 






XXX11 



RECREATION. 





Six Years' Record of 
(POWDERS) 

"Orangeine" is called a "shotgun prescription." Yes! But '*. it hits every 
time," and, unlike the shotgun, does not " kick." Through its delicate 
balance of skilfully selected remedies, without reactive or drug effect, 
<( Orangeine" hits the cause of those every-day ills of life, and assures per- 


fect health to the average mortal. It quickly reaches Headaches, 
Colds, Bowel troubles. Neuralgia ; it offsets Exhaustion of 

Body and mind, dispels Brain Fllg and restores from even extreme 
debility oi nervous prostration. Its six years' record lor Hay Fever 
(preparatory and systematic) has proved to most stubborn cases that they 
can "stay at home, go anywhere" if they take " Orangeine" as 
directed. In thousands of families and communities '-Orangeine" has 
become the"stitch-in-time" to secure prompt correction of incipient ail- 
ment, and thus insure continued good health. 

Orangeine is sold by druggists generally, in 2."o., 50c. and .*l packages 
Composition published in every package, Aak your druggist or write us lor a free 
sample; full information, ^voluminous volumes of prominent endorsement. 

Chas. L. Harriett, Trest. THE ORANGEINE CHEMICAL CO., Chicago 



A prominent physician writes The North- 
ern Rubber Co., St. Paul, Minn., as follows: 
"The Banner rubber coat purchased of you 3 
years ago I can fully recommend, even to 
the extent of buying a new one if this ever 
wears out, which, however, there seems little 
prospect of it's doing" 



The Lady — I gave you a piece of pie last 
week, and you've been sending your friends 
here ever since. 

The Tramp — You're mistaken, lady. 
Them was my enemies. — Judge. 

The Chicago College oi Dental Surgery 

Founded in 18S0. 2106 Graduates. Has continued 
u ider the management of its founders since its organization 
aid offers unsurpassed facilities to dental students. For 
announcement address Dr. TRU3IAX W. BliOPHV, 
Di'un. yy5 W. Harrison Sr.. C'hirasrn. 




Elastic Hosiery and 
Abdominal Supporters 

Made to order. Special terms to physicians. 
Send Measurements when writing for prices. 




Everybody who does work which wears or 
soils the sleeves needs 

t/fy Banner Rubber 
Oversleeves 

go cents a Pair, postpaid, 

NORTHERN RUBBER CO. 



Were I to be tried for my life I should 
wish no better judge than a fair-minded 
American. I like the American disposition 
to give the underdog a show, and I rejoice 
that Recreation dares fight so openly in be- 
half of over-persecuted birds and animals. 
The automatic shot gun is too murderously 
unfair a weapon to ever become popular in 
this country, while the comparatively few 
persons who would use it are the sort who 
should not be permitted to use any gun. 1 
own a pump gun and while I know it can 
be used wrongly, have never killed over 5 
birds in a day. For large game I find the 
Savage a good gun, only I wish it had more 
drop. 

K. E. J., Ashland, Ky. 

A Fountain Pen 

has become a necessity with every busi- 
ness man. You can get a 

Laughlin 

Fountain 

Pen 

Made by the Laughlin Manufacturing Co. 
Detroit, Michigan 

For 2 Yearly Subscrip- 
tions to RECREATION 

And you can get these 2 subscriptions in 
20 minutes, any day. 

The Laughlin is one of the best pens in 
the market, and thousands of them are in 
daily use. 

There is no reason why you should be 
without one. 

Sample Copies of Recreation 
for use in Canvassing 

Furniafeed on Application 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 



WHAT A SOUTHERN SPORTSMAN 
THINKS OF IT. 
Beaufort, N. C, November 20, 1903. 
The Winchester Arms Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

1 think it my duty to write regarding the 
new automatic gun that 1 understand you 
are putting on the market. From the 
standpoint of the true sportsman, there 
would be as much honor in a full bag of 
game taken with an automatic gun as if 
the bag were filled from a trap or from the 
market. The true sportsman can not use 
such a gun ; it can be used only by the 
game slaughterer. The result must, there- 
fore, be such extermination of our game 
that there will be little use and little de- 
mand for your legitimate firearms. 

Should some of your automatic guns be 
sold in our community, it must be expected 
that, of necessity, within a few years, the 
demand for your guns and ammunition 
would decline, with the continued exter- 
mination of our game. 

My words may not have great weight 
with you, but I trust our Legislature may, 
now that this extreme has been reached, 
pass a long needed law, effectually prohib- 
iting the bringing into this state, for sale 
or use, any gun other than the respectable 
single or double shooting shot guns of 
reasonable bore. 

I write from one of the best game coun- 
ties in Eastern North Carolina. 

Respectfully, Alonzo Thomas, 

Treasurer of Carteret County. 

Something Special. A Fine Casting 
Minnow Free: To each person sending 
me $1 for one new yearly subscription 
to Recreation, or sending it direct to be 
placed to my credit, I will forward, all 
charges prepaid, a finely finished wood- 
en, casting minnow. This minnow has 
the latest improved spinner which will 
not catch upon the weeds; is finished 
with silver belly and green back, has 
three treble hooks, is weighted so it will 
not twist the line, always keeps right 
side up when in the water, and is just 
the right weight for casting. Lloyd J. 
Tooley, 141 Burr Oak Street, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 

"Well lathered is 
half shaved." No 
man can be well lath- 
ered without Will- 
iams' Shaving Soap. 

^yUliams' Shaving Sticks and Tableta »old everywhere, 
Th* J. B, Willtaw Co,, Gkrtwbury, tern* 



MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER. 
for AFTER SHAVING 




Insist that your barber use Meniieii'M Toilet Powder 

after he shaves you. It is antiseptic, and will PREVENT 
any of the many skin diseases often contracted. A posi- 
tive relief for PRICKLY HEAT, CHAFING, SUN- 
I5URN, and all afflictions of the skin. Removes all odor 
of perspiration. Get Mennen's— the original. Sold 
everywhere, or mailed for 25 cents. Sample Free 

GERHARD MENNEN CO.. NEWARK, N.J* 



e Mermen's Violet Talcum s 




Exquisite 



. 




REGISTERED 

WATERPROOF 




COURT 
PLASTER 



Heals Cuts, Abrasions, Hang-Nails, 

Chapped and Split Lips or Fingers, 

Burns, Blisters, Etc Instantly 

Relieves ( hilblains, Frosted 

Ears, Stings of Insects, 

Chafed or Mistered Feet, 

Callous Spots, Etc., Etc. 

A coating on the sensitive parts 
will protect the feet from being chared 

or blistered by uew or heavy .shoes. 

Applied with h brush ati.l immedi- 
ately dries, forming a tough, trans- 
parent, colorless waterproof coating. 

Sportsmen, Motorists, 
Golfers, Mechanics, Etc. 

are all liable to bruise, scratch or 
scrape their skin. "NEW-SKIN" will 
heal these injuries, will not wash off, 
and after it Is applied the injury is 
forgotten, as "NEW-SKIN" makes a 
temporary new skin until the broken 
skin is healed under it. 

EACH 

Pocket Size (Size of Illustration), 10c. 
Family Sl/.c, .... 25c. 

2 oz. Unfiles '(for Surgeons and 

Hospitals), .... 50c. 



At the Druggists, or wo 
will mail a package any- 
where in the United States 
on receipt of price. 

Douglas Htt. Co, 

9C108 Church at. 

P»l>t' W, »tw Tor*, 



xxxiv RECREATION. 



Do you want 

BOAT? 




If so, send me 



15 Yearly Subscriptions for 



and get a 

Mullins' Get There Ducking Boat 

or send me 20 yearly subscriptions 
for Recreation and get a 

Mullins' Bustle Ducking Boat 

Sample Copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request, address 

RECREATION 

23 West 24th St., New York City 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 




Varicocele 
Hydrocele 



Cured to Stay Our&d in 5 Days* 
No Gutting or Pain a Guaranteed 
Gua*e Oi* Money Refunded. 

\f£kOff*{%f*KrB C Under my treatment this insidi- 
V S^T^S%£>vJ%9SLOmC.m ous disease rapidly disappears. 
Pain ceases almost instantly. The stagnant blood is driven 
from the dilated veins and all soreness and swelling sub- 
sides. Every indication of Varicocele vanishes and in its 
stead comes the pleasure of perfect health. Many ailments 
are reflex, originating from other diseases. For instance, 
innumerable blood and nervous diseases result from poison- 
ous taints in the system. Varicocele and Hydrocele, if neg- 
l TinnTcniM n lected will undermine physical strength, depress the mental 

m. •• e ^". .; J H". . ' l'/T* ir . i faculties, derange the nervous system, and ultimately pro- 

The Master Specialist of Chicago, who Cures Varicocele, duce complicated results. In treating diseases of men I 
Hydrocele, and treats patients personally. always cure the effect as well as the cause. I desire that 

Established 1880. every person afflicted with these or allied diseases write me 

( CopiBiaHTED ) so j can explain my method of cure, which is safe and per- 

manent. My consultation will cost you nothing, and my charges for a perfect cure will be reasonable and 
not more than you will be willing to pay for the benefits conferred. 

/*/0#o^Jlt/V f$f Gill*** is w ^ at y° u want. I give a legal guaranty to cure or refund your money. 
•*"" I«««lljr «£» W&MW tS what I have done for others I can do for you. I can cure you at home 

/**ftMMAOMS»Mff#AM*»A {±nw%fm*i**w%45ski- ° ne personal visit at my office is preferred, but if 
UOrreSpOnaenCe UOmlUenUaiM it is imposs ible for you to call, write me your con- 
dition fully, and you will receive in plain envelope a scientific and honest opinion of your case, Free of 
charge. My home treatment is successful. My books and lectures mailed free upon application. 

H. J.TILLOTSOIN, M.D.,140 Tillotson Bldg, 84 Dearborn St., CHICAGO 



For Hunters, Anglers, Prospectors, Ranchmen, 



The Press Button Knife 

IS THE THING. 

A single pressure of the button opens it. It locks open, cannot 
close on the fingers, saves the finger nails, has 2 blades hand-forged 
from Wardlow's best English steel, and is in every respect as good 
a knife as can be made. Ladies' and Gentlemen's sizes in Stag 
Shell or Ivory handles, including moisture-proof Chamois case 
securely mailed to any address for 75 CENTS, 

Send for catalogue K for description and prices of other styles. 



NATIONAL 

CUTLERY 

COMPANY 

Walden, 



And all others who go 
into the Woods or Hills 

Our 5-inch Press Button Hunt- 
ing Knife can not be excelled. 
Can be opened with one hand, 
and will not open or close acci- 
dentally. 

Handsome Stag: Handle 

Price, One Dollar 




XXXVI 



RECREATION. 



For Convenience and Comfort 

When Shooting or Fishing 

Every Sportsman Should Have 

A Knit Jacket 








Send me Five Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation 

and get a jacket, such as shown in cut herewith, 
and which will fit you and keep you warm 



Sample Copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request, address 

RECREATION 

23 WEST 24th ST., NEW YORK CITY 



D 



RECREATION. 



xxxvn 



We take a great deal of pleasure in 
reading Recreation and it is the cleanest 
publication that comes to us. Several of 
our expeditions have been suggested by 
articles in Recreation. We think the same 
as you do on the game hog question ; a man 
ceases to be a sportsman when he goes out 
to butcher game. 

One hunting party consisted of C. C. 
Wood and wife, Mrs. McGlochlin and T. Mr. 
Wood shot a 12 gauge Parker. Mrs. Wood 
a 16 gauge Baker, Mrs. McGlochlin a 16 
gauge Spencer, and I a 12 gauge Lefever. 
On one of our trips last fall we left the 
city at 12 o'clock at night and drove 30 
miles, getting to the lake about daylight 
to get the morning shoot. We killed sev- 
eral mallards, a few chickens and a brace 
of jack rabbits, the ladies getting their full 
share of the game. We have a regular hunt- 
ing rig with a place in the back covered and 
curtained for the dogs. We use a plumber's 
torch for cooking. 

R. E. McGlochlin, Aberdeen. S. D. 

I am sorry Mrs: McGlochlin should ever 
have used a pump gun, and I trust that 
before making her next trip she will con- 
vert this into scrap iron and get a double 
barrel gun. — Editor. 



He threw his small clock at a cat — 

He missed her, you can bet ; 
The clock it stopped at half-past three, 

The cat is going yet. 

— Yonkers Statesman. 



Avoid Wrinkles by Using 




J! Stalitnan Dresser Crunk 

KEEPS YOUR CLOTHING 
FLAT AND SMOOTH 

Everything in reach. No heavy trays, but light, easy ? tin- 
ning drawers. Holds as much and costs no more than a good 
box trunk. Hand riveted, almost indestructible. Once tried, 
always recommended. Sent CO. D., privilege examina- 
tion. 2c stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 

F. A. STALLMAN 

87 W. Spring St. Columbus, O. 





TheC. A.EDGARTONMFG.CO.,Box 311 Shirley, Mass. 



POROUS 



\voolens 



Whether partaking in games 
afloat or afield or touring in your 
auto, do not forget your 

JAEGER WOOLENS 

These light absorbent fabrics 
prevent over-heating, while at the 
same time effectually safeguarding 
against chill. No vacation outfit 
complete without them. 

"Booklets and Samples Free 

Dr.Jaeger'sS.W.S.Co.'s 

OWN STORES 

NEW TORKl^Fiftyve. 
/ \o4 Broadway 
BROOKLYN: 504 Fulton Street 
BOSTON : 230-232 Boylstou Street 
PHILADELPHIA : 1510 Chestnut St. 
CHICAGO: 82 State Street 



AGENTS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL 

CITIES 



XXXV111 



RECREATION. 




Are You an 

Amateur 

Photographer? 



If so would you like a Camera 
that will photograph 

A whole range of mountains 

A whole sweep of river 

A whole army 

A whole fleet of ships 

A whole city 

Or any other vast stretch of scenery or moving 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT 




Yista 



is the thing. It lists at $30 



One of the greatest inventions of the age* 
Given as a premium for J 2 subscriptions. 



For particulars address 



RECREATION 

23 West 24th Street NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 



THE 

CONNECTING 
LINKS 

Between 

Men and Comfort 

Are 



Washburne's 



Patent 
Improved 



Fasteners 



CUFF 
HOLDER 



THE TINY LEVER WITH A BULLDOG GRIP. 
NEVER COME LOOSE ACCIDENTALLY. 

Key Chain and Ring, 25c* 
Cuff Holders, . - 20c. 
Scarf Holders, - - 10c. 
Drawers Supporters, 20c. 



SCARF 
HOLDER 



Sold everywhere or sent on receipt of price. Send for Catalogue. 

^American ring co., Dept.44WATERBURY, conn. 



We have good bird shooting here in sea- 
son and cotton tails were more plentiful 
last winter than ever. Though the winter 
was severe, farmers tell me that they still 
see a great number of grouse and quails. 
I think the deep snow and continued cold 
has rather favored the birds, as it put a 
stop to rabbit hunting by boys and pork- 
ers who kill birds whenever the chance 
offers. Chas. Swailes, Kingston, Mich. 



"Sometimes," said Uncle Eben, "a man 
gives hisse'f credit foh bein' resigned to 
fate when he has simply settled down to 
bein' good an' lazy." — Washington Star. 



NOW DEPOSITED IN TflE BANK 

$75,000.00 

IN CASH GIVEN AWAY. 

To arouse interest in, and to advertise the 
GREAT ST. LOUIS WORLD'S FAIR, 

this enormous sum will be distributed. 
Full information will be sent you ABSO- 
LUTELY FREE. Just send your 
name and address on a postal card and 
we will send you full particulars. 

World's Fair Contest Co., 

108 N. 8th Street 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Game is scarce here. Quails are about 
gone, owing to the wet spring and severe 
winter. Ducks have commenced to come, 
and though the season is not yet open they 
are being shot by a few pot hunters. We 
have fox and red squirrels in our woods 
but they are shy. We have one animal 
that is always plentiful and that is the 
woodchuck. Any one who wants sport 
shooting with a small caliber rifle should 
come here and shoot chucks. 

F. F. McCormick, Huron, O. 



May — Marriage does not seem to have 
improved your husband any. 

Stella — No ; you see we live in a Harlem 
flat, and there is little room for improve- 
ment. — New York Herald. 

Hamper Trunk 

Stronger than a Trunk 
As light as a Basket 




Can be used for a hamper 
or packing-trunk at home, 
will outwear a ten-dollar 
trunk on the road. Just the 
thing for the summer tourist 
or camper. Made in all 
sizes. 32-inch size, $4.00. 
Freight paid east of the 
Mississippi river and north 
of Tennessee. 

SCHWANBECK BROS. 

489 Milwaukee Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



xl 



RECREATION. 




Anything that can be built of natural wood 

I build Rustic Work of all kinds from the best seasoned red cedar, including 




Automobile Houses 

{20 designs) 
Log Cabins 
Boat Houses 
Bath Houses 



Well Houses 
Porches 
Bird Houses 
Horse Blocks 
Roof Gardens 




Fences 
Bridges 
Gateways 
Chairs and Settles 
Tree Seats 
Summer Houses 



Wineroom Furniture 

Vases 

Flower Stands and 

Lawn Furniture 

of all kinds 
Beer Gardens 



The larger work is built in sections for convenient 
shipment, and may be quickly set up by any one 
handy with tools. 

I build from plans furnished, or will furnish plans 
with estimates. You will find my prices right, and the 
work of the very best. Representatives will call 
upon request. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 
MY WORK SPEAKS EOR ITSEQ.F 

Mention Recreation. 

D. P. VAN GORDEN 



No. 9. — RUSTIC STTMMERHOUSE (9 feet). Con. 
structed of best red cedar, with or without seats, 
table built in center if desired; will stand the' 
weather and last for years. 



P. O. Box, 971 



Orange, N. J. 

Opposite D. & L. R. R. depot 



A Press Button Hunting Knife 

Is one of the best articles a hunter ever carried 




It has a 4 Inch Blade made of the Best Silver Steel 

The knife cannot come open in your pocket. It cannot close on your hand when in use. It opens and closes 
only when 

YOU PRESS THE BUTTON 

If you once use one of these knives you will never use any other. You can get one as a premium for 

3 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION 

Sample Copies furnished on request. 



RECREATION. 



xli 




We save you from 2.3% to 40^ on line Office and 
Library Furniture. We manufacture the goods we 
sell. We guarantee quality and prices satisfactory. 




No. 10 II Office Desk 

48 in. long by 30 in. wide; with 
tiJe boxes and letter files com- 
plete as illustrated. Quarter- 
sawed oak front; balance of 
desk plain oak golden a 1 q nn 
polish finish. Priced I O.OU 

Other roll top desks up to 
£300.00. Ask for desk cata- 
ogue No. 2— mailed free. 




Sectional Bookcase 

49 in. high; 34 in. wide; g r A 
in. deep inside. Quarter- 
sawed oak, art glass a in n r 
doors, drawer base, 3>l0i/3 

Plain glass, no drawer — 
$13.50. Ask for catalogue 
No. 1 —mailed free. 



We prepay freight east of Mississippi River and north 
of Tennessee (points beyond on equal basis). 

T0E FBED PCEY CO., Ltfl.,**"'*'^"' RAPIDS - M,CI 



Dept. LL3, 1300-1320 Division St 



Hutchinson, Minn. 
Winchester Arms Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Dear Sirs : 

I have been informed that you are build- 
ing machinery for the making of an auto- 
matic shot gun. 

I am loth to believe that the makers of 
such fine arms and ammunition as you put 
out would make and sell so destructive a 
weapon:. I request you in the name of all 
decent sportsmen, and for the sake of our 
wild birds and animals, to discontinue your 
preparations for making this engine of des- 
truction. 

Yours truly, 

G. W. Goldsmith. 



Assistant — There is a man out here who 
wants to arrange with you to publish his 
novel. 

Publisher— What's it about? 

Assistant — He hasn't written it yet, but 
he has a name for it that is a sure seller. 

Publisher — Sign a contract with him at 
once before any of my competitors hear of 
him. — New Orleans Times-Democrat. 



AIR BRUSH 




ART WORK. 



We are making and selling the 
best Art Tool in use. Applies 
color by jet of air, enabling the 
artist to do better work and save 
time. No studio complete with- 
out it. Circulars free. Mention 
Recreation. Address 

Air Brush Mfg. Co. 

126 Nassau St., Rockford, 111., U. S. A, 




t/udor 



PorcK Shades 

are made of Linden Fibre, in different colors 
to match the woodwork of your house, and 
in various sizes to fit your porch. They 
shut out the sun and at the same time let 
in the air, making the porch a cool, cozy 
and comfortable room on warm summer 
days. They screen the porch from the 
gaze of passers-by, while allowing you 
an unobstructed view. Very inexpensive. 

Write today for our booklet, "Cosy Nooks." 

Hough Shade Corporation, 24 IMcKey Blvd., Janesville.Wis. 




When you move take 
your house with you 




This is dead easy in these days of portable 
houses. You can spend this summer on the sea 
shore, next summer in the mountains, the fol- 
lowing summer in the Wilderness of Maine, and 
always have a good, substantial, portable house 
to live in. Easily taken down, cheaply trans- 
ported, easily erected. Neat, cozy and inex- 
pensive. Two men with a wrench, a few bolts 
and screws can take down , or put up one oi 
these houses in two hours. 

Send for illustrated circular which tells the whole story, 
and mention Recreation. 




I 





H 




SPRINGFIELD. MASS, 



xlii RECREATION. 



GOING into CAMP? 

If so, you will need 

A TENT 

You can get one big enough for 4 men 
and their camp outfit, by sending me 

8 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

at $1 each. You can get another tent 
big enough for 6 men by sending me 

10 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

at $1 each. 



Why pay out money for a tent when you can 
make your friends pay for it? 

Sail in and fit yourself for your summer 
vacation. 

This is a great opportunity, and will hold good 
for only a few weeks. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in can- 
vassing furnished on application. 



RECREATION. 



xliii 



THE 

FOUR-TRACK 

NEWS 

An Illustrated Magazine 
of Travel and Education 

MORE THAN 152 PAGES MONTHLY 

Its scope and character are indicated by the 
following titles of articles that have ap- 
peared in recent issues ; all pro- 
fusely illustrated. 



Among Golden Tagodas, 

Marblehead, - 

A Study in Shells, - 

Santo Domingo, 

Eleven Hours of Afternoon, - 

A Gala Night on the Neckar, - 

Echoes From Sleepy Hollow, 

Golf in the Rockies, 

In Barbara Freitchie's Town, 

Back of the Backwoods, - 

A Feast of Music, 

Sailors' Snug Harbor, 

Since Betty Goifs — Poem, - 

Niagara's Historic Environs, - 

In the Old Wood-Burner Days, 



Kirk Munroe 
M. Irulay Taylor 

- Dr. R. W. Shufeldt 
- Frederick A. Oder 

B - - Cy Warman 

Kathleen L. Greig 

Minna Irving 

Henry Russell Wray 

- Thomas C. Harbaugh 
Charles Howard Shinn 

Jane W. Guthrie 

- Bessie H. Dean 

Josephine Wilhelm Hard 

Eben'P. Dorr 

James O. Whittemore 



The Land of Liberty and Legends, Guy Morrison Walker 



Earl W. Mayo 
George Hyde Preston 
Minnie J. Reynolds 

- Charlotte Philip 

Alexander Porter 

Isabel R. Wallach 

William Wait 

SINGLE COPIES j CENTS, or 50 CENTS A YEAR 

Can be had of newsdealers, or by addressing 

George H. Daniels, Publisher, 

Room No. 48 7 East 42d Street, New York 



Nature's Treasure-house, 
Down the Golden Yukon, 
Corral and Lasso, - 
Little Histories : 

An Historic Derelict, 
Where Lincoln Died, 
The Poets' Corner, 
The Treason House, 



Gi0l0p0gl0 



AND RETURN 



VIA 



UNION PACIFIC 



EVERY DAY from June 1st to Sept. 
30th, inclusive, with final return 
limit Oct. 31st, 1904, from 



ST. LOUIS $25.00 
CHICAGO S3O.00 



With correspondingly low rates from 
other points. 



Be sure your ticket reads over this line 
Inquire or 

R. TENBROECK, C. E. A. 

287 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 




Vacation Days 

Those who from experience know how 
much of pleasure is contributed to the vaca- 
tion in the choice of a route select the 

Lake Shore 

& Michigan Southern Railway. 

This is the road which reaches by its famous 
through trains, or by its direct connections, 
the entire resort country of the eastern, mid- 
dle and western states, including Lake Chau- 
tauqua, south shore Lake Erie country , and its 
Islands, lake region in northern Indiana and 
southern Michigan, Colorado, Yellowstone 
country, St. Lawrence River, Adirondack 
and White Mountains, Atlantic Coast, etc. 

Reduced rate tickets on sale June ist to 
September 30th. All railways sell in con- 
nection with the Lake Lhore. 

Privileges — Enjoyable privileges ac- 
corded on tickets over Lake Shore — stop- 
over Lake Chautauqua, Niagara Falls, Lake 
Erie Islands, option of boat or rail between 
Cleveland and Buffalo, etc. 

Summer Books — To assist in your vaca- 
tion plans the following books will be sent 
by undersigned for eight cents in postage : 
"The Ideal Vacation Land," "Quiet Sum- 
mer Retreats," "Lake Chautauqua," "Lake 
Shore Tours," "Travel Privileges," "Book 
of Trains." 

A. J. Smith, g. p. & t. a., Cleveland, O. 






xliv 



RECREATION. 



A VALUABLE PRESENT 

For Your Wife, Your Mother, Your 
Sister or Your Best Girl 

For 25 Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation, I will send you 
a set of 

1 DISH AND 12 
TOMATO PLATES 

made by Higgins & Seiter, 50 West 226. Street, N. Y. Listed at 

$19.50. 

And, for 20 Yearly Subscrip- 
tions to Recreation, I will send 
you a set of 



12 WATERMELON 
PLATES 

listed at $16.50. (See illustration) 




T 



HESE are fine, thin, white 
china plates, beautifully hand 
painted, with pictures of tomatoes 
and tomato vines, or watermelons 
and watermelon vines, in natural 
colors, and each set of plates is 
enclosed in a case made in an exact 
imitation of a large tomato or a 
watermelon. 

No more beautiful or appropriate present could possibly be 
found for a lady than one of these sets. 

You can earn one of them in a few hours, and at the same time 
earn the everlasting gratitude of the lady to whom you may give it. 

SEND FOR PACKAGE OF SAMPLE COPIES FOR USE IN CANVASSING 

Recreation w. 24th 3 street. New York 



RECREATION. 



xlv 



Hotel 



=* 



Cumberland 

Broadway at 54£ SU 
New York* 

THE most luxuriously furnished Hotel 
in New York. Finest specimens of 
Oriental rugs throughout, mahogany fur- 
niture and rich draperies. 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF. 

Ideal location; near principal theatres 
and shops and in plain view of Central 
Park. Within one minute's walk of Sixth 
Ave. Elevated Road, and accessible to all 
car lines of the Metropolitan surface roads. 

Transient rates, with bath, $2.50 per 
day and upward. 

The most beautiful restaurant in New 
York. Fine music. 

Excellent food and sensible prices. 



Sunday Evening Table d'Hvte Dinner, 

6 to 8:30 - - $1.00. 

Souvenirs Every Sunday Evening. 



%= 



EDWARD R. SWE1T. Proprietor. 



-J 



Free: Black Squirrels and Parti-Col- 
ored Squirrels. — Will send a pair of eith- 
er kind of these rare and beautiful pets 
to any one who will send me 12 new 
yearly subscriptions to Recreation. Will 
send a pair of handsome Fox Squirrels 
for 6 new yearly subscriptions, or a pair 
of cute little Flying Squirrels for only 2 
new subscriptions. Squirrels are the 
prettiest, tamest, cleanest and most sat- 
isfactory of all pets. Safe delivery of 
squirrels guaranteed to all parts of U. S. 
or Canada. E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Tex. 



For a sportsman, Recreation is the best 
magazine in the world. 

J. J. Campbell, Montgomery, Ala. 



PATENTS 



promptly obtained OR NO FEE. Trade-Marks, 
Caveats, Copyrights and Labels registered. 
TWENTY YEARS' PRACTICE. Highest references. 
Send model, sketch or photo, for free report 
on patentability. All business confidential. 
HAND-BOOK FREE. Explains everything. Tells 
How to Obtain and Sell Patents, What Inventions 
Will Pay, How to Get a Partner, explains best 
mechanical movements, and contains 300 other 
subjects of importance to inventors. Address, 



H. B. WILLSON & GO. 



Patent 
. Attorneys 
786 F Street, N. W. , WASHINGTON, D. C. 



JVetou Guide *BooK_ 

"In the 
Maine Woods" 

' PUBLISHED BY THE 

Bangor (SL Aroostook 
R&J1 Road 

A N artistically arranged publication of 
nearly 200 pages, descriptive of the 
fishing, camping, canoeing, hunting, etc., 
to be enjoyed in the great Northern Maine 
Woods. Over 100 beautiful illustrations, 
including several colored pages. 

A welcome addition to any library. 

Copy mailed for 10c in stamps. 
Mention Recreation. 

C.C.BR.OWN, G. P. ®l T. A. 
BANGOR, MAINE 



Summer Cottage— 1000 Islands 

FOR SALE — Two islands (adjoining) in Canadian 
channel, 7 miles from Alexandria Bay, containing about 
.5 acres of land. 

Large cottage, 16 rooms, boat houses, ice house, bath 
house, wharves, etc. Water supply to every floor, with 
drainage. House furnished complete. 

Daily mail, steamboat, telephone, electric bells and 
other conveniences. Everything in good condition and 
ready for immediate occupancy. Ice and firewood sup- 
plied. 

Also, if desired, stable on main shore with land, fishing 
and sail boats, etc. For further particulars address 

F. P. BR.ONSON, Ottawa. Canada 
ADIROINDACKS 

CAMP MOHAWK and Cottages 

Fourth Lake of the Fulton Chain. Patronized largely 
by families and parties of friends. Two handsome 
new cottages have been added which have very 
large rooms, fireplaces and baths, Write for booklet. 
Mention Recreation. 

MRS. H. If. LONGSTAFF , Old Forge, N.Y. 

GLEN ALLEN, VA. 

is merely an assemblage of pleasant villas and pretty rural 
homes. It is in a woodland region midway between the 
mountains and the sea — 9 hours from New York, 3 hours from 
Washington, and 20 minutes from Richmond. On receipt of 
stamp the Glen Allen Postmaster will send a little booklet 
about it to anyone seeking a home where the wholesome 
seclusion of the forest life is in close touch with the outer 
world. Mention RECREATION 

The Harrington & Richardson shot gun 
is at hand. Many thanks for so valuable a 
premium. 

Arthur Matteson, Idaho Springs, Colo. 



xlvi 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
Which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 



A Book, a Gun, a Camera 

A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod >■ ' r '^X- 

A Reel, a Tent, \ tUb ' 



FREE OF 



Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the required number 
is obtained the premium earned will be shipoed. 

TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO new yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation at $1 each, I will send a copy of 
Hunting in the Great West, Cloth ; or an 
Ingersoll Watch or Cyclometer, listed at 
$1 ; or a Recreation Waterproof Match 
Box, made by W. L. Marble and listed 
at 50c ; or a Shakespeare Revolution Bait 
listed at 75c ; or a Laughlin Fountain 
Pen ; or a dozen Trout Flies, assorted, 
listed at $1 ; or a pair of Attachable Bye- 
glass Temples, gold-plated, made by Gall 
& Lembke ; or one Rifle Wick Plug, made 
by Hemm & AVoodward, Sidney, Ohio, 
30 caliber to 50 caliber, or Shotgun Wick 
Plug, 20 gauge up to 10 gauge ; or a pair 
of chrome tanned horsehide hunting and 
driving gloves, listed at $1.50, made by 
J. P. Luther Glove Co. ; or a J. C. Hand 
trap made by the Mitchell Mfg. Co., listed 
at $4. 

THREE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
safety pocket ax, made by W. L. Marble 
and listed at $2.50 ; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or a pair of Shot- 
gun Wick Plugs made by Hemm & Wood- 
ward, Sidney, Ohio, 20 gauge to 10 gauge ; 
or a Polished Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, 
made by E. W. Stiles ; or a pair of gaunt- 
lets, for hunting and driving, ladies' size, 
listed at $2.50, made by J. P. Luther 
Glove Co., or a Press Button Jack Knife, 
made by The Novelty Knife Co., and 
listed at $1. 

FOUR new subscriptions at $1 each, an 
Ideal Hunting Knife, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $2.50; or a 32 cali- 
ber, automatic double action revolver, 
made by Harrington & Richardson Arms 
Co. ; or a Gold Medal Folding Camp Bed, 
made by the Gold Medal Camp Furniture 
Co. 

FIVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a copy 
of Cruisings in the Cascades, cloth; or 
an Ideal Hunting Knife made by W. L. 
Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a pair of 
lock lever skates, made by Barney & 
Berry, listed at $4.50 ; or a Bristol Steel 
Fishing Rod, listed at $G or less ; or a 
Knit Hunting Coat, made by the Blauvelt 
Knitting Co., and listed at $6 ; or a set of 
convertible Ampliscopes (5 lenses), listed 
at $5. 

SIX new subscriptions at $1 each, a Hawk- 
eye Refrigerating Basket made by the Bur- 
lington Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka 
golf balls listed at $4; or a Pocket Poco 
B 3 1 / 4x4 1 / 4, made by the Rochester Op- 
tical Co., listed at $9. 



SEVEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
copy of The Big Game of North America, 
or of The American Book of the Dog, 
cloth, or one set Lakewood golf clubs, 
5 in number, listing at $5 ; or a series 
11F Korona Camera, made by the Gund- 
lach Optical Co*, listed at $10. 

EIGHT new subscriptions at $1 each. A 
series 1, 4x5 Korona Camera, made by 
the Gundlach Optical Co., listed at $12, 
or an Acme single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $8. 

TEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4.50 ; or a Water- 
proof Wall Tent 7x7, made by Aber- 
crombie & Fitch, and listed at $8 ; or a 
Rough Rider rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $12 ; or a Pneumatic Camp Mattress, 
listed at $18 ; or a pair of Opera Glasses 
made by Gall & Lembke and listed at $10. 

TWELVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Davenport Ejector Gun, listed at $10, or 
a Cycle Poco No. 3, 4x5, made by the 
Rochester Optical Co., listed at $15 . 

FIFTEEN new subscriptions, $1 each, a 
Shakespeare' Reel, Silver Plated, listed at 
$15 ; or a set of rabbit plates made by 
Higgins & Seiter, and listed at $8 ; or 
a Field Glass made by Gall & Lembke ; 
or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, complete, 
with canvas cover, listed at $1G ; or a 
Bulls-Eye rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $16; or a' pair of horsehide hunting 
boots, listed at $10 ; or a Queen Hammock, 
made by the King Folding Canvas Boat 
Co., and listed at $15 ; or a Mullins Duck 
Boat, listed at $20; or an 11-foot King 
Folding Canvas Boat, listed at 



TWENTY new subscriptions at $1 each, 
a 14-karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, 
with Waltham Movement, listed at $20; 
or an Elita single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $18 ; 
or an Acme Folding Canvas Boat, No. 1, 
Grade A, listed at $27 ; or a Queen Ham- 
mock, made by the King Folding Canvas 
Boat Co., and listed at $20; or a Mul- 
lins' Bustle Ducking Boat, listed at $27. 

TWENTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, a 14-ft. King Folding Canvas Boat, 
listed at $48. 

THIRTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Waterproof Tent, 14% x 17, made by 
Abercrombie & Fitch, and listed at $25. 

FORTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Savage .303 Repeating Rifle ; or a No. 10 
Gun Cabinet, made by the West End Fur- 
niture Co., and listed at $32. 

FIFTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. 20 Gun Cabinet, made by tbe West 
End Furniture Co., and listed at $38; 
or a Colt Automatic Pistol, made by the 
Colt's Patent Fire Arms Mfg. Co., and 
listed at $25. 

TWO HUNDRED new subscriptions at $1 
each, a strictly first class Upright Piano, 
listed at $750. * 

Address, RCCfCS-llO!! jjew York 



RECREATION. 



xlvii 





When Your Dog' 
Won't Eat 



Didn't know a dog: could have chronic dyspepsia ? Just let a case of disordered 
digestion run on unattended to, and you'll see a dog: with chronic dyspepsia. 

Sergeant's Condition Pills 

will improve the appetite, because whatever the cause may be, these pills will seek it out 
at once— hit the nail right on the head— and set thing's right ; tone up all the dog - — give 
him vim and vigor. At all Drug-gists and Sporting: Goods Dealers. Two sizes. 

50c. and $LOO 

Sergeant's Stire SHot 

lie dog's lack of appetite may come from a very common dog ailment — Worms. 

Sergeant's Stxre SHot will rid a dog or puppy of worms with never-failing 
promptness, and contain absolutely nothing that can injure any dog. 

Price, 50c. per Bottle 

If you can't get Sergeant's Dog Remedies, we will send them to you, post-paid, on 
receipt of the price. 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., Richmond, Va. 

4®^ '3 cents and your address will bring you our 

handsome, Dog "Book and pedigree blanks — FREE 



X 



Ivin 



RECREATION. 



Latest patent and Im- 
proved Canvas Fold- 
ing Boat on the 
Market. 



Puncture proof. 
Tempered 'Steel 
frame. No bolts to 
remove. Folds most 
compact of any boat 
made. 




THE 

Latest, Safest 

AND 

Best Canvas Boat 

Is what we offer you. A Bont 
built on modern lines that will 
prove a pleasure to own and use. 
Selected materials used through- 
out, and it comes to you guar- 
anteed the best. A handy and 
safe boat for fishing and shoot- 
ing. Write for descriptive circu- 
lar and catalogue. 

Mention Recreation 

LIFE SAVING 

FOLDING CANVAS BOAT 

COMPANY 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 



The automatic shot gun is a pest, and 
should be exterminated. 

My advice to J. P. Tilson is not to use 
a rifled chamber in a shot gun, for the pur- 
pose of shooting a bullet. It is not nearly 
as accurate as a rifle, owing to the inferior 
sights and short-rifled chamber. Then as 
one of our friends said some time ago, 
there is a sidewise blast of gas that is 
damaging to the barrel of the gun. The 
use of this auxiliary chamber will not dam- 
age the choke of the gun in the least. 
Alfred J. Miller, 
174 Pratt St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Have tried the Syracuse shot gun you 
sent me. It is O. K. and I am much 
pleased. F. A. Webb, Waukegan, 111. 

Alexander Hamilton nvas a 
MODEL Of ELOQUENCE 




When Folded. 27x5x4 



T^ PARAGON 



is a 



MODEL OF EXCELLENCE 



A FOLDING COT AMONG 
FOLDING COTS 

For the Camper, Canoeist, Yachtsman, etc. 

No. 1. Three-fold, light- 
weight, small -pkg. style. 

Price $3.50 

Write for circular giving full description 

Mention Recreation. 



THE PARAGON FOLDING FURNITURE 
COMPANY, 141 Centre Si., N. Y, City 



Some writer has insinuated that the old 
fashioned Colt revolver is better than the 
so called improved model. I believe this 
on comparing those illustrated on pages 14 
and 4 of the Colt catalogue. I should like 
to read an article treating of the merits of 
each as to durability, wear, action, shoot- 
ing qualities, etc. The newer models must 
have merit, for the company is putting out 
target revolvers of this kind. 

I am sure your readers would be glad to 
read something on this line. 

Charles B. Keller, Ridgway, Pa. ' 



I received the Syracuse gun and all my 
friends admire it. I thank you sincerely 
for such a fine premium. 

R. A. Merrill, Beloit, Wis. 

DO YOU WISH 



TO IMPROVE 
YOUR SHOOTING? 



THE J. C. HAND TRAP 

Will help you. It throws 
any of the clay targets now 
in use, giving an excellent 
representation of a bird in 
flight. 



I will send you a 

J. C. HAND TRAP 

for 2i yearly subscriptions to 

Recreation 



Send in your club now % and 
improve your shooting 



RECREATION. 



xlix 




RUSHTON 



CANOES 



ROW 

BOAT 
lo the 
:oo-foot 
IfACHT 



IjASOLINE OR 
ELECTRIC POWE? 

KUTO BOATS 
pD ENGINES 

Send for a copy of our Quarterly 
Publication "The Launch." 
Catalog for the postage ioc. 




TRUSCOTT BOAT MFG. CO. 

St. Joseph, Mich., 17. S. A. 



For Solid Enjoyment 

on lake or river, nothing surpasses 
the canoe, with its entire absence 
of dirt and noise, its ease of pad- 
dling, its restful, gliding motion, 
and its combination of lightness and 
speed. 

Don't miss this pleasure. Order 
immediately to make sure of getting 
a canoe in time for this year's vaca- 
tion. My famous ' canvas-covered 
cedar "Indian Girl" model, 15, 16, 17 
or 18 feet long, $32 to $44. Price in- 
cludes packing. 

Send for my complete Catalogue of pleasure 
boats, all-cedar and canvas-covered canoes, oars, 
paddles, sails and fittings— free for the asking. 

J. H. RUSHTON, 8I7 Water St., Canton, N. Y. 



A kiss is a temporary erythema and 
sporific effulgence of the physiognomy, 
aethologized by one perceptiveness of the 
sensorium when in a predicament of tin- 
equilibrity from a sense of shame, anger 
or other cause, eventuating in a paresis of 
the vasomotor filaments of the facial capil- 
laries, whereby, being divested of their 
elasticity, they are suffused with a radiance 
effemenating from an intimidated praecor- 
dia. — Southern Medicine. 



Give 'em hell on the automatic gun. We 
have absolutely refused to sell it in this 
store. 

^_^ H. R. Sweny, Albany, N. Y. 



I spent a week last November hunting 
with 3 friends in the vicinity of Oxley, 
Pocahontas county, W. Va. The woods 
were full of sign, but the only deer we 
saw was feeding among some cattle. We 
cut him out from them and finally dropped 
him with a .30-.30 Savage at about 350 
yards. It was a big 5-point buck and the 
first wild deer any of our party had seen. 
D. E. Jones, Pine Grove, W. Va. 



The Yawman & Erbe automatic reel re- 
ceived. I thank you kindly for it. It is 
certainly a beauty, and I feel a thousand 
times repaid for my efforts in procuring 
the subscriptions necesssary to win it. 

F. Fellgraff, Jr., N. Y. City. 



Non-Sinhable Steel Row Boat *2K!2 

for 'Immediate Delivery 



$ UPWARDS. 



tfflflflfi^fl! 



left out in ?he weather ^f t hon?'H We11 ' ^V^ °J rot -\ With ^sonable care will last a life time. Can be 
Graceful in deS St -n™H t^Kp- a, ?emg heavuy galvanized, will not rust in fresh or salt water, 
description. Ovlr'.o diffi^nt Jf hL A11 boats fitte d with air chambers. Can't Sink. Send for detailed 
thousands of thlse boat? fr Ml w£?^? quare - stern * nd double Pointed. Immediate delivery-We build 
MS#-h*«U^ £« in B l he winter for spring and summer shipment. Can make immediate delivery. 

cmgan Steel Boat Co., 1275 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



RECREATION. 




iWestern Recreation launch 



ABSOLUTE LAUNCH SATISFACTION 

Is contained in the "Western Recreation.". .It possesses those essential points, 
Grace Beauty of Outline, Symmetry, Simplicity and Safety. Speed is there too if 
you want it. Most reasonable in first cost, most economical to maintain. 

THE BEST FINISHED, HANDSOMEST, MOST RELIABLE. 

We build them with either Torpedo or Semi-Elliptic Hulls, and in completeness, it is 

the ideal and dependable craft for both pleasure and security. 

i*l XkT J. — M««J«n Pnrfino Will please those who build their 

The Western Marine Lngine own £ ulls> Beautiful Art catalog 

describing- our Launches and Marine Engines sent upon receipt of 10c. Catalog L. 

Western Launch and Engine Works, No. 12 Linn St.. Mishawaka. Ind 



Friends just in from a goose hunt at Wil- 
lows, Glenn county, say that their automatic 
shot guns are simply great; nothing gets 
away. One bunch of 8 birds all stopped by 
2 guns. This is in line with your claim 
that these guns are murderous. The use 
of this gun will certainly exterminate water 
fowl much quicker than would the ordinary 
double or the pump gun. I have a 3-year- 
old boy who takes a great notion to guns, 
but if automatics are much used he will 
never know the pleasure of wing shooting. 
E. A. Green, San Francisco, Cal. 



It was a well-dressed young, man, with 
a sad. far-away look in his eyes, that stood 
on the steps as the lady opened the door. 

"Excuse me, madam," he said, as he lift- 
ed his hat, "but could you direct me to the 
Home for the Friendless?" 

"Do you mean to say that you are seek- 
ing it as a refuge?" she asked, in surprise. 

"I am, madam," he replied. "I am a 
baseball umpire." — Chicago News. 



Recreation is the best magazine for 
sportsmen in the country. 

R. M. Simmons, Decatur, Tex. 



I received the Al Vista camera in per- 
fect working order and am well pleased 
with it. I heartily thank you for your kind- 
ness. 

Fred T. Miller, Lyons, N. Y. 




Folding: Canvas Boats 

were not satisfactory until the 



was produced. It's a revelation 
in boat construction, nothing 
like it ever made. Nonsinkable 
Cant tip over. Puncture Proof, 
wear longer than a wooden boat. 
No repairs. No cost for storage, 
always ready, folds into a small 
n -loot special neat package, carry by hand* 

used by the U. S. Navy. They are simple, wonderful. A thoroughly 
patented article. Beware of imitations. Made only by ourselves. A cat- 
alog of IOO engravings and 400 testimonials sent on receipt of 6 cents. 

Bottom Boards rest on the frame, not on the canvas, ribbed longitu- 
dinally and diagonally. They are stiffer and safer than a Wooden Boat 
because the lines are fuller, and are much easier to row or paddle. 

KING FOLDING CANVAS BOAT CO. 

Mention Recreation. KALAMAZOO, MICH., U. S, A 



RECREATION. 



li 




Patented 




Can be instantly applied to 
boats, wagon seats, lawn seats, 
ball park seats, in fact can be 
applied to any board seat not 
over i Y% inch in thickness. 

Prire 5 Cordurov >$4-°°- 

' ( Imitation Leather, $3.50. 

Delivered to your address in 
any part of the United States 
east of the Rocky Mountains, by 

ThcOld Hickory ChairCo. 

MARTINSVILLE, IND. 



BUILD YOUR OWN BOAT 

bythe'BROOKS system" 



fi6FT-L0NoJ:xact size PATTERNS of every piece. Complete IN = 
UFT-BEAM;STRUCTI0N5.Each step plainly ILLUSTRATED. Experts 
pa tterns ft 5\e nce unnecessary. Hundreds have built this boat, 
^working spare time, at a total cost of $i+.oo • 
T\ Boat Patterns of all kinds and sizes up to sift, 
^at prices from $3.00 up. We also build comple- 



Motors 

l*to25HF. 



Operated by 

GASOLINE 
WOR 



COMBINATION 
LAUNCH-SAIL 
&ROW-BOAT 
BROOK5 BOAT MFG.CO.STAB BAY CITY, MICH 



Ited boats and knock down frames. 
PARTICULARS FREE -25 < brings 64 p.illustrated catalogue, 
set of working instructions and illustrations. 




CANOES aivdROWBOATS 

Built of Maine Cedar, covered with best canvas. Made by 
■workmen who know how. Models and sizes for all kinds of 
service. From $28 up. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Send NOW for Free Illustrated Catalogs. 

Old Town Canoe Co., 28 Middle St., Old Town, Me. 



The Fay & Bowen Marine Motor is a revelation to 
those who have used others. Reliable, safe, durable 
and easy to operate. Remarkable speed control. 
Best of all, it starts when you start it. No handle 
or crank is used. Our patent igniter is absolutely unique'and al- 
ways instant and positive in action. It is really* the only perfect 
and satisfactory igniter. Motors complete from 1% to 25 actual 
Horse Power ready for installation. 

"We also build a line of the finest launches afloat, complete with 
our motor installed, all ready to run. We make these in either the 
usual round stern model or our flat stern torpedo model in lengths 
from 18 to 35 feet. We furnish large cabin launches on special order. 
For excellence of workmanship and beauty of finish and design our 
boats are unsurpassed. Ask for description of our fast torpedo 
outfits. 

Send for catalogue and live testimonials from satisfied 
customers. Our customers are our best advertisers. 

FAY (EJL BOWEN ENGINE CO. 
74 LsJce Street, Geneva, N. Y. 

(FOBMERLY AUBURN, N. Y.) 



Willie Peebles — The horse was goin' — 
Teacher — Don't forget your g, Willie. 
Willie Peebles — Gee, the horse was goin'. 
—Puck. 



Recreation is the best magazine of to- 
day. 

Geo. A. Nebele, Milwaukee, Wis. 



Game of all kinds is scarce in this vicin- 
ity. Rabbits and quails are occasionally 
met with. Farther from town, fair hunt- 
ing can be had. Ducks, ruffed grouse, rab- 
bits, quails, racoons and now and then a 
woodcock represents about all of the avail- 
able game. Plenty of coots in the late fall, 
although they are not shot much here. 
R. V. Haskin, Durand, Mich. 




ACME FOLDING BOAT CO., MIAMISBUKtt, O. 



Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, Can- 
ada and England. Just filled an order for U. S. 
Government, who prefer our boats. Received medal and award at Chicago World's 
Fair. If you investigate we will get your order. Mention Recreation. 

Acme Folding Bodtt Company, MiaLinisbvirg, O. 



A Sportman's ; MULLINS 
Boat 



<« 




T 4 , 

ft. lon^ . 
36-inch beam 



Get There" Steel Duck Boat 

Price $20 — Crated on cars Salem 

Endorsed by Thousands of Sports- 
men. Air Chamber each end. Always ready 
No repairs. Send for handsome free book. 



228 Depot Street, 



W. H. MULLEN'S 



Salem, Ohio 



THE BALL-BEARING OARLOCKS 

A device that does for the rowboat what the ball bearing did for the 
bicycle. Every ounce of energy applied to the handle is transmitted 
to the blade without loss. No clanking or squeaking — does twice 
the work with one-half the effort. Absolutely noiseless 
and IVictionlesS. The ideal locks for pleasure rowing, hunt- 
ing and fishing. For either tight or loose oars as desired. If not 
handled by your dealer, write for descriptive circular and prices. 

T. H. GARRETT, Jr. E?i AUBURN, N. Y, 




.:: 



" .-.-^r^w 



Webbers Hand=Knit Jackets 




" ■ : 



:-.v- - 









e:j 







■■riwi* m 



-: Pfeuiadeip&ia. say: "The k 
.i.i«i since - g :be goods w< hare sok 

- 
T R. Davis Anns 



■ 



MEN'S 57. - : - , . 



— p r i -p 

r~ i ice. LaCHE::^ 5 ; 



: 

Geo. F. Webber. Mam 



send ro«t a jacket, express prepaid, and if not 

e- S .:— . A Detroit. Mich. 



FOR 



Solid Comfort 



5LMMER or WINTER 




Thompson- 
Quimby 



The Buffalo Is Well Nish Extinct 



Boots 



I Make the B^st 

-c-;rk cu-VTi-iee-i I re - 
~:=5 -.""- :. :::!:.:: :' 7.1 :.• I -.t: : y. 
. _T -. : :re -:f : .: A~'<:i :■.:. : .-. ;f« :r_ :■.-_■ 
;.::i:::r_ Me::::: 7:::z-.:::y 

T. H. GUTHRIE 

:- S: NEWARK, N. J. 



i im. Here - lance 1 get it 

I have in stock a limited numbe: 
buffalo ho: - g and 

fitted with n. ed flanges at 

:he "ruse ?; :;-.a: :'.-.ey ;.i" re 
screwed on the wall, thus forming 

A Novel and 
Effective Gun Rack 

So long as the supply lasts I 

_ s .1 ~ :. :: ::' :dese dc-rns : 

3 YeariySubscripiionsto RECREATION 

r."-:.".;:.e :;~:es ::r use in :.*.~vass:ng 
furnished :r. re:ues: Address 



Recreation, 23 W 24th St,, New York 



RECREATION. 



liii 



STILL HUNTING OR HOUNDING? 

H. S. Ferrell, of Weiser, Ida., is right in 
his claim that there is more sport for the 
many in driving deer with hounds than in 
still hunting, or "stalking," to be quite 
English in my nomenclature. But I don't 
agree at all with the rest of his assertions. 
Still-hunting is high art, that can only be 
practiced successfully by one who is a rifle- 
shot and a master of woodcraft. When 
deer are driven by hounds any rabbit hunt- 
er can pour a handful of buckshot into 
one and pose as a mighty hunter before the 
ladies, if the deer happens to be driven by 
his stand, and he doesn't have buck fever 
and drop his gun at the crucial moment. 
For the average city hunter this is a great 
advantage, as but few of them have a 
chance to gain any practical knowledge of 
woodcraft. A pack of hounds and one deer 
will give more sport to a crowd of 20 nov- 
ices than 10 deer will give one expert still 
hunter. 

No one who has eaten clean still-hunted 
venison, cares much about tasting the semi- 
carrion that results from running a deer 
with hounds several hours before killing 
him 1 . Six Shooter Bill. 



I agree with Mr. Ferrell that hounding 
is not so destructive to deer as still hunt- 
ing. Neither is it so dangerous to the 
hunter. Accidental shootings, now so com- 
mon in the deer woods, were extremely 
rare in the days when hounding was al- 
lowed. L. H. G., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Free: — To any person sending me $1. for 
1 new yearly subscription to Recreation, 
I will send a deck of the celebrated golf 
playing cards. 

For 2 subscriptions, a fine artificial 
minnow listed at $1, or a spool of '50 
yards of Kingfisher No. 5 silk casting 
line listed at 75 cents. 

For 6 subscriptions, a lancewood cast- 
ing pole, length 5 feet, with middle joint 
convenient length for carrying, and fine 
agate tip. This is a pole that can always 
be depended on as it is made of selected 
stock. List price, $5.50. Arthur W. 
Bruce, 508 Woodward Avenue, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 






piorris Canvas Covered Canoes 

Special Indian model for safety. Catalog on request. 
Mention Recreation. 

E. N- MORRIS, Vearfe, Maine. 



Bicycle Hew, 



JULY. 



Never since the begin- 
ning of this industry have 
bicycles been so near per- 
fection, both in construc- 
tion and equipment, as they 
are to-day. Modern inven- 
tions like the two-speed 
gear and new coaster brake 
have brought the chainless 
wheels to a wonderful stage 
of development. 

The iKvo-speed gear is 
rightly called a hill leveler. 
A slight pressure of either 
foot on either pedal changes 
the gear from high to low 
for hill climbing and diffi- 
cult roads. Another like 
pressure sets the high gears 
for a swift run on the level. 

The coaster brake in- 
creasesthe rider's efficiency 
about one-third. 

American highways are in 
better condition than ever 
before, so that touring a- 
wheel is attractive. 



The people have never been 
more outspoken in their ap- 
preciation of bicycling as a 
health-giving exercise. It is 
rapidly returning to a lead- 
ing place in the list of out- 
door recreations. 

The Pope Manufacturing 
Company has two depart- 
ments, the Eastern and the 
Western, the former at 
Hartford, Conn., manufac- 
turing and marketing the 
famous Columbia, Cleve- 
land, Tribune and Crawford 
wheels, and the latter at 
Chicago, 111., producing the 
well-known Rambler, Cres- 
cent, Monarch and Imperial 
models. 

Catalogues are free at 
the stores of over 10,000 
dealers, or any one cata- 
logue will be mailed on 
receipt of a two-cent 
stamp. 



CANOEING 

Comfort in canoeing depends to a great] 
extent upon the freedom from annoyances, [ 
such as mosquitoes and flics. In the) 
shadiest nooks and corners the pests are! 
always found. You can thoroughly enjoy' 

IrtnOTI 1/ the ^ uiet 8e clusion of a shady nook 
J AlO I I U l\ without annoyance if you burn Jap- 
stick. It not only drives away all I 

DRIVES AWAY flies and mosquitoes, but lends an J 
Win^nillTflF^ agreeable odor. Box of 12 Japs.ticks, 
muuyuf i UUVJ eacn burning one hour, mailed, 50 cts. 

THE CULECIDE C0. s 170J& Summer St., Boston, Mass. j 



look 



Recreation is the best magazine of its 
kind ever published. 

Samuel Kink, Wooster, O. 




TO OWNERS OF GASOLINE ENGINES, 
AUTOMOBILES, LAUNCHES, Etc. 



The 



Autto-Spcrker 



does away entirely with all starting and 
running batteries, their annoyance and 
expense. No belt — no switch — no bat- 
teries. Can be attached to any engine 
now using batteries. Fully guaranteed; 
write for descriptive catalog. 

Motsinqer Device Mfg. Co. 

75 Main St., Pendleton, Ind. 




Write today 
for free catalogue. 
15 foot ffno 

boat, crated s>*? 



Especially valuable at summer 
resorts, for family boating. 



Mullins Galvanized 
Steel Pleasure Boats 

Made of steel. Practical indestructible. Air 
chamber each end. Cannot leak. Require no 
caulking. Ideal boat for family use, summer 
resorts, parks. Guaranteed. Will seat five persons in com- 
fort. The modern row boat for pleasure, safety and durability. 

W. H. MULLINS. 228 Depot Street, Salem. Ohio 



liv RECREATION. 





OOD NIGHT'S RES! 



is absolutely essential to the pleasure 
and profit of every camping trip. 
Here is a way to make this easy 

For 4 Yearly Subscriptions to 

RECREATION 

I will send you a FOLDING CANVAS 
COT that -weighs only about 10 pounds and 
which you can roll up with your blankets 
without adding materially to the bulk. 

You can sleep as comfortably on one of 
these cots in camp, as you can at home on a 
brass bedstead, witli woven spring and hair 
mattress. 

I have but a few of these cots in hand 
and when this supply is exhausted this offer 
will be withdrawn. 



Send for package of Sample Copies for use in 

canvassing 

Recreation west llu. st., New York 



RECREATION. 



lv 



At Ni£ht 

whether running or 
standing still 

The 

Ignition and Lighting System for Gasoline 

Launches, Automobiles and Gas Engines has not only 
the advantage of absolutely sure ignition, more 
speed and more power but the Apple Igniting Dy- 
namo furnishes sufficient additional current to main- 
tain three electric lights, (two side lights and one rear light) on 
your Automobile. Outfits of various capacities for Launches 
The storage batteries in the Apple system will maintain 6 
lights when the dynamo is not running. No weak batteries. 
No coal oil. No carbide. No matches to blow out. Can be at- 
tached to a n y engine 
now using batteries. 

Don't be at the mercy 
of a twenty -cent door- 
bell battery. 

Write for information. 

See our exhibits in the 
Automobile and Electri- 
cal Sections at St, Louis, 

The Dayton Electrical Mfg. Co, 

126 Reibold Bldg., Dayton, Ohio 



A QUESTIONABLE JOKE. 

I have your letter asking if it is true 
that I and 2 friends killed 100 rabbits in 
a day or so, as was stated in the Coey- 
man's Herald. It is not true and I am not 
that sort of man at all. The largest num- 
ber of rabbits I killed in one day last fall 
was 6. The day referred to in the Herald's 
item my friends and I killed 2 rabbits, 1 
grouse, 1 grey squirrel and 1 fox. The 
item was inserted as a joke and I enclose 
a letter from its author acknowledging the 
fact. I am a member of the Albany County 
Fish and Game Club, and no one in the 
county has worked harder than I to pro- 
tect fish and game. I caused the arrest of 
2 persons for dynamiting, and since August 
last I have helped plant over 4,000 trout 
in our streams. 

C. Griffin, So. Bethlehem, N. Y. 

The article about Mr. C. Griffen and 2 
friends killing 100 rabbits was only a 
friendly joke. The 3 men had been hunt- 
ing a number of days and had killed so 
little game that I thought they deserved 
mention of some kind. 

Wni, McGee, So. Bethlehem, N. Y. 

I am glad to learn that Mr. Griffin was 
not guilty of slaughtering rabbits, and I 
regret that Mr. McGee's idea of what con- 
stitutes a joke should have induced him 
to libel his friends. — Editor. 




Write for our free illustrated book k which fully 
describes the various Cadillac models, and gives 
address of nearest agency where demonstrations 
are given. As to performance in everyday ser- 
vice — ask any Cadillac owner. 
Cadillac Automobile Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association Licensed Automobile Manufacturers. 





The 
"Pipe of Peace" 

(TRADE MARK) 

"Just what you've been looking for" 

Can't burn the tongue. Tobacco heart 

prevented, as saliva saturated with nicotine can- 
not get into the mouth and poison your system. 
No valves. No piths. No water used to 
filter the smoke, and become rank. 

Always sweet and dry. Best Briar and Solid Hard 
Rubber Stem (bent or straight). Sent any- Cfl Ppnfo 
where, postage paid, for *'*' WOIIIO 

Please send money order. 

The Practical IVS'f'g Company 
Room IZ5. 1907 Park Ave., New York City 

RELIABLE AGENCIES WANTED 



lvi 



RECREATION. 



IDQK O 
THEC 




IftUN D E 8/VOOD15 

ORIGINAL 

DEVILED HAM 



In camp, picnic, or home, it will be found not 
only pure, but delicious and satisfying. Made only of 
pure spices and sugar-cured ham. There is but one 
deviled ham — Underwood's Red Devil Brand. All 
others are imitations, but imitations in name only, no 
more like Underwood's than chalk is like cheese. 

Send for book 0/43 prize receipts. 
WM. UNDERWOOD CO.. BOSTON. MASS. 



"* 



Am glad to see Recreation go for the 
game hogs. Keep it np. As a youngster, in 
a country teeming with game, I was guilty 
on occasions, but now I make it an ironclad 
rule never to exceed the limit. I can put 
my gun away and lay off for the balance of 
the day without the least regret. 

I should like to see a vigorous crusade 
carried on against spring shooting. It is 
all wrong. Spring shooting is responsible 
for so many of our waterfowl moving their 
breeding grounds farther- North. Many 
varieties that a few years ago bred in im- 
mense numbers in North Dakota are now 
seldom known to breed South of the boun- 
dary. 

H. H. Parkhouse, St. Paul. Minn. 

TTPFJg ON APPROVAL 

The 

Hawkeye 
Refrigerator 
Basket 

Is made of the best 
rattan it is possible 
to purchase, with a 
water-tight. non-rust- 
able metal lining and 
non-conducting i n - 
terlining of hair-felt and 
asbestos. 

A removable compartment of 
sufficient size to hold enough ice to beep 
the contents of the basket cool and sweet 
hours (see sectional view below), makes it an 
ideal acquisition to any sportsman'? kit — an 
ideal utility for all persons going ou picnic 
excursions or outings of any kind. 

THE HAWKEYE REFRIGERATOR BASKET WILL LAST A LIFETIME. 
SENT FREE ON APPROVAL. 

READ (H'R OFFER.— Send us $3.60 and we will 
send yon our No. 2 Basket, size 20x18x10; UBe it 
ten days, and if notfully satisfied that it bears 
out every claim we make for it. send it back at 
mir expense and wc will cheerfully refund every 
cent of your money; or. we "ill send the basket 
to any responsible person FREE ON APPROVAL; 
test itin any way yon like for ten days and if not 
satisfied it is the best thing yon ever saw of its 
kind for the purpose, send it back at our ex- 
pense, otherwise send us your check for So. 50. 

We want customers, 
but we want satisfied customers. 
THE HAWKEYE REFRIGERATOR BASKET IS FOR SALE BY DEALERS GENERALLY 

Descriptive booklet sent free to interested persons. Better write for it today. 





\The Burlington Basket Co. 



18 Main St., Burlington, Iowa 



Merrill, Wis. 
Winchester Arms Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

I have used your rifles many years and 
find them all that any decent man can ask 
for, but I would not associate with any man 
who would use an automatic shot gun. 

Yours truly, H. Ackerman. 



Simple Simon was riding on a Broadway 
car. 

"You must let me have your fare," said 
the conductor, "or get off." 

"I'm glad to know," said Simple Simon, 
as he prepared to alight, "that there's some 
way of stopping the car." — Life. 



Club 
Cocktails 



Famous the world 
over for purity. 
They never vary. 
The secret of their 
perfect blend is that 
they are kept six 
months before being 
drawn off and bot- 
tled. Be sure you 
have them in your 
camp, on the yacht, 
and on your outing 
trips wherever you 
go. They are ready and require no 
mixing. Simply pour over cracked ice. 

For Sale by all Fancy Grocers and Dealers 

Q. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO. 

29 BROADWAY, B. T. HARTFORD. COHH. 




RECREATION. 



lvii 



Chicago 
Branch, 

304 Wabash 
Avenue. 



>C^ N 



' (I % \t '^\\ 



Touring Cars C% 



Boston 
Branch, 

145 Columbus 
Avenue. 



J& 



A Rambler Reflection 

Thousands of people who are considering the purchase of an automobile, 
want a machine that is strong — powerful — easy riding — simple — durable — graceful 
and right up-to-date. Model *'H," here illustrated, has full elliptic springs 
— two powerful brakes — 28 inch wheels — 3 inch tires — 81 inch wheel base — large 
cylinder engine of 7 actual horse power. It will carry four people over any kind 
of road in any kind of weather. Fitted with two 
lamps and horn, $850.00 at the factory. 

Six different models, $750.00 to $1,350.00 at 
the factory. Write for the new Art Catalog. 

Thos. B. Jeffery Sr Company, 
IQenosha, Wis., U.S.Ji. 



M 



Xki 



* 



Take good care of 
your hands 



You may need 
them next year 



Send me 
2 yearly subscriptions to Recreation 

and I will send you 
a pair of Leather Hunting Gloves 

made to your measure, by the 

Luther Glove Company 

Berlin, Wisconsin 



Sample copies for use in canvass- 
ing furnished on request 



In Venango county is a queer fellow who 
is called Tom, who drinks and stutters and 
stutters and drinks. He has a brother Jim, 
who is glib of tongue and was a great liar 
— but was believed to have reformed, for 
he professed to become a good man, and 
was baptized in the river. It was a bitter 
cold day in winter, and the ice had to be 
cut to make a place for the ceremony. Tom 
was close by. As Jim came up out of the 
water he said to him : 
"Is it c-c-cold, Jim?" 
|'No," replied Jim ; "not at all." 
"D-p-dip him again, m-m-minister," cried 
Tom. "He 1-1-lies yet!" 



Practical Common Sense CAMP 
in 6 Sizes. STOVE 

Either with or with- 
. gr ^ r out oven. The light- 

est, strongest, most 
compact, practical 
stove made. Cast 
combination sheet 
steel top, smooth out- 
side, heavy lining in 
fire box and around 
oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe carried inside the 
stove. Burns large wood and keeps fire longer than any- 
other. Used by over 9,000 campers and only one stove 
returned. 

For catalogue giving full particulars, mention Recrea- 
tion and address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 




lviii 



RECREATION. 




QJT 




JSkmm JmL ML 



The Bristol Steel Fishing Rod adds keen 
delight to the sport. Flexible, light — equal 
toalmostany emergency, full of life and back- 
bone. Made to last— not for a season only. 

The "Kalamazoo" Bait-casting Rod (with 
patent detachable finger hook, enabling one 
to "thumb" the reel properly) is a pro- 
nounced favorite, With it a novice can cast 
from 75 to 100 feet after a few trials, and an 
expert can excel his best previous record. 

Send for Catalogue "B" giving- full de- 
scription of this rod and 25 other styles. 
Your dealer can supply our rods at re- 
duced prices this season. 

J5he HORTON MFG, CO. 

Bristol, Conn., U. S. A. 






« 



BRISTOL RODS 

eJSl. Li>wi9er>cQ River 





The " BRISTOL " Steel 

Fishing Rod is universally 

popular on the St. Lawrence 

River. The fishermen buy 

them to use — the boatmen 

buy them to rent. 

The strong current and heavy 
fish common there will take all 
the heart out of an ordinary rod 
but the u Bristol " will never 
ve up, and hangs just as true 

after a long season's service 

as at the start. 

If you want a Rod that will 
stand hard work — anywhere — 
get the " Bristol;" it will not 
disappoint you. Sold by all 
dealers, at reduced nrices. 

PfPP Catalog"D" 

* * V'V' showing more man 

twenty-five styles of Steel Rods 

The Horton Mfg. Co. 

Bristol, Conn.. U. S. A. 



RECREATION. 



lix 



Don't let Mosquitoes, Gnats or Flies Bother You 



It would take millions of mosquitoes or gnats to 
fill a peck measure. But one miserable Iittlp mos- 
quito can make a peck of trouble. 

PRESTO Keeps Mosquitoes Away 

Spray a little PRESTO around a room or 
tent and it will keep mosquitoes, flies and all 
other winged pests from entering. A little 
PRESTO rubbed on the face and hands and 
all exposed parts will protect you absolutely 
against the bites of mosquitoes, gnats, flies, etc. 

They Will Not Bite When PRESTO 
Is Applied 

Here is an extract from a letter sent us by a 
well-known sportsman — one of scores that have 
come to us unsolicited; he hasused PRESTO 
after trying other pest deterrents. 




"I have just returned from a salmon fishing expedition 
on the west coast of New Foundland away up near the 
straits of Belle Isle. I am writing to say that PRE STO 
is without exception the best remedy for mosquitoes, 
black flies, gnats, etc., that I have ever been able to get 
hold of," etc. ROBT. C. LOWRY, New York 



PRESTO KILLS ALL INSECTS 

It is colorless and harmless, leaves no stain and has a pleasant odor. 

Ask Your D©aler for Itr If he does not have it mail 20 cents for sample can, postpaid. Accept nothing 

as a substitute, for there is nothing that can take its place. 

PRESTO MANUFACTURING CO. 

LOCK BOX 1248 When writing mention Recreation OSSINING, N, Y. 



While I am a constant reader of Rec- 
reation and agree with it on all other 
points, I must maintain that hounding deer 
is better sport than still hunting. The man 
who thinks otherwise prefers a whole car- 
cass to a share of one in good company. 
It is no trick at all to kill deer at a water 
hole, and that is the way most men still 
hunt. I think the deer would last longer 
if hounding was. allowed and still hunting 
forbidden. 

T. Van Auken, Beaumont, Tex. 



Reading Recreation wakens me up and 
puts new energy in me. 

F. Wiscoskie, Argentine, Kan. 

"TAKAPART" PLEEL 

(No tools required.) 

"Best 
Casting " 
Keel 
on Earth 



Very Smooth Running. 

Highest finish and workmanship. Handle is adjustable in 
any position. Bearings on spool are adjustable, with which 
a slight friction can be applied to prevent back lashing. 
Quadruple action. Compare it with any other, if it is not the 
best by all odds, return it. 60 yd. $5, 80 yd. $5.50, 100 yd. $6. 
With "Automatic" Click, 50c extra. From all Dealers. 
Send for Catalogue. 

A. F. MEISSELBACH & BRO., Mfrs. 

Mention Recreation. 6 Prospect St., Newark, N. J. 




Ideal y e t Practical 
Compact b «tCapacious 




On that VACATION TRIP take this up-to-date 

FISHING TACKLE BOX 

And have constant occasion to 
thank us for the suggestion. 

SENT, CARRIAGE PAID, fOR $2.00 

REFERENCES 

" Recreation," New York City 
Yale National Bank, New Haven, Conn. 

Address with remittance or for further details 

MERRIAM MfG. CO. 

DURHAM, CONN. 

Sole Makers of Johnson's Trayless Tackle Box 

Mention RECREATION 



lx 



RECREATION. 




For the True Sports- 
man (or Woman) 

No other Reel makes a Battle with the Finny Tribe so alluring as a 

"Y and E" 
Automatic 




Little 

«I THE AUTOMATIC FEATURE: SXfftiy- 

To automatically control the tension 
of the line so that no slack will be 
given, no matter how swiftly your fish may turn. 

«I THE FREE-RUNNING FEATURE : Simply press a slide, making 

your Reel free-running ( just like any other 
Reel) or automatic. Make your cast 
free-running; reel in your line by 
releasing a spring instead of wind- 
ing a crank like fury. 

^ Write today for our new and 
.3 complete Reel Booklet No. 107 
— " When Pardner was Mas- 
cot" — the exciting story of 
J the biggest Rainbow Trout 
ever landed. 

-3= 




"Putting the Camel 
Through the 
Needle's Eye" 



BOOKLET 107 

Sent Postpaid on Your Request 



Yawman & Erbe 

Mfg. CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



lxl 



VACATION LIGHT 



& 



Equal or better than your light at home. One 
gallon gasoline lasts all summer in our 



Brilliant Gas Lamps 



They make their own gas, while they burn ioo-candle strong. For in 
or outdoor use ; portable, light and handy. Can be hung anywhere Safer 
and cheaper than kerosene. If you are not using them, write for our "R" 
catalog, or we will send a lamp like cut, complete, ready for use, to your 
nearest express station prepaid on receipt of $5. 00, every lamp guaranteed. 

Mention Recreation. 

BRILXIAtfT GAS LAMP CO., 
42 State St., Chicago, 111. 




100-candle power. 



The deer season closed November i. Only 
4 or 5 were killed, although many were 
seen. We have only io days in which to 
hunt them. As soon as the season opens 
they are hounded, though that is unlawful, 
and they seem to disappear as by magic. 
Those killed here were not large, but were 
in fine condition. 

Dan Rijenburgh, Bennington, Vt. 



A Spanish man dwelling in Cadiz, 
Had no special love for the ladiz ; 

But his wife and her mother 

Were women — no other — 
And his life was a regular Hadiz. 

— Baltimore American. 



Small Profits— Quick Sales 




for trial— seni us 



4 Cf* f° r an assorted sample doz. 



^/\f» for an assorted sample doz. 
OvFv Regular price, 60 cents. 

/An for an assorted sample doz. 
OwL Regular price, 84 cents. 

/ An for an assorted dozen D„ ce C"|iae 
OUt Regular price 84 cents. Ddbo I HtJb 



Quality A Flies 
Quality B Flies 
Quality C Flies 



SPLIT BAMBOO RODS 



Fly Rods |- 7 pArifc Bait Rods 

$0 feet, 6 ounces \3 M VWlilO 9 feet, 8 ounces 

With cork grip and extra tip, in wood form 



THE H. H. KIFFE CO. 

523 Broadway, New York City 

Catalogs of Any of above goods free on application, 
Mention Rbcrbjation, 



Two young men. Almon Coffee and Griff 
Coffee of Effington, S. D.. were arrested 
last fall by Game Warden F. C. Ned j ley 
for shooting before the open season. They 
had 7 or 8 ducks when caught. Police Jus- 
tice Prindeville confiscated their guns and 
fined them $25 each and costs. 

S. S. M., Sisseton, S. D. 



The Harrington & Richardson gun you 
sent me came safe and sound. It is a peach 
and shoots as well as my father's $50 gun. 
H. E. Smith, Ottawa, Kan. 



PHEASANTS 




WATCH RESULTS 

Have your "poults" died at an early age ? If 

so, use in future Spratt's Patent Pheasant 

Meal and watch results. 
Have they grown strong and healthy? If not, 

feed Spratt's Patent Pheasant Meal and watch 

results. 
Are the old birds strong and vigorous? If not, 

try Spratt's Patent Pheasant Food and watch 

results. 
If eggs are scarce and infertile, feed Spratt's 

Patent Pheasant Food and watch results. 
The Common Sense of Pheasant Rearing. 

By Spratt's Patent, 10 cents. 

We also manufacture a specially prepared 
food for dogs, puppies, cats, rabbits, poultry, 
game, pigeons, fish, birds, etc. 

Write for our free Catalogue, "Dog Culture,'' with prac- 
tical chapters on the feeding, kenneling and m inagement of 



Dogs, also a chapter on cats. 




Mention RECREATION. 
450 Market St., 3fei»ark,Jf.J. 
714 S, 4th St., St. J,euJs,3!c. 
i324 TalenaU St., 

gau f raatUeo, CW. 



(Araw Ltd. 



lxii 



RECREATIOX. 




HERE IS ANOTHER! 



If you will send me 



15 Yearly Subscriptions 



to 



RECREATION 

I will send you a high-grade, powerful 

FIELD GLASS 

LISTED AT $15.00 

A field glass is indispensable to every hunter, and this is 
one of the latest and best on the market for the price. I 
have but a few of these instruments on hand and the offer 
will be withdrawn as soon as the supply is exhausted. 
Therefore, if you want one start immediately. 



Sample copies of RECREATION for use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION. 



A HUNTING 





to swear l>y, instead of at. This is Marbles 
Special Hunting Knife. It is made of the same 
quality steel and, temper as our celebrated Ideal 
Knives, which were so widely advertised last 
month, and was expressly designed to secure 
the greatest possible strength together with the 
fewest parts obtainable in hunting knife con- 
struction. It is pronounced by many expert 
woodsmen to be the acme of perfection. 

It is straight bevel ground, has bone chopper 
at back of point, is one-quarter inch thick at 
back of blade and is of the same thickness in 
the tang. Two oblong recesses are forged in 
both sides of the tang, thus making the knife 
balance perfectly. Side plates are of selected 
slabs of German stag horn. 

This knife carries our regular guarantee. 
Made with 5 -inch blade only. 

Price, prepaid, $£.50 

All our specialties are for sale by dealers. 
New catalog shows 18 new specialties. Send 
for it and mention Recreation. 

Marble Safety Axe Co. 

Dept. A. GLADSTONE, MICH, 



If the Winchester people persist in manu- 
facturing an automatic shot gun I for one 
will never use anything made by them. 
Heretofore I have been strongly in favor of 
both their guns and ammunition. 

C. N. Ely, Chicago, 111. 



I have read your magazine one year. 
beats anything I ever read. 

Geo. T. Norris, Torrington, Con, 



It 



The zVa x 4/4 pocket Poco, given by Rec- 
reation as a premium for 6 new subscrib- 
ers, arrived all safe. I wish to thank you 
very much for your promptness in sending 
it, and I am well pleased with the camera. 
I have no doubt it will prove as good as it 
looks. I had no difficulty in securing the 
required number of subscribers, and hope 
to be able to secure more. 

Harry Messenger, Danville, Que. 




Detachable Even Spoolers 



WHEN attached to a good reel make the best casting and fishing outfit on earth at about 
half the price of old style. They give perfect satisfaction in every case. To prevent 
regret* later on, don't buy the wrong reel. Our free catalog (B) names reels spooler 
will fit. Price and description of spoolers, gun cleaners, fish scalers, ball bearing, jeweled, and 
steel pivot bearing reels fitted with even spooler. Our new rubber hook-shield binds hook and 
line securely to rod when not in use. All sorts of trouble and profanity prevented in an instant. 



\. 



BISHOP & SON, 



PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS 
RACINE, WIS., U. S.A. 




ni.'t; Cs&gg^^i^is 



Cast into any kind of weeds — that's where the fish are — with our 
Hooks. Unbreakable. No swivels. Frog Holders that will take 
a dozen bass to the frog. Catalogue sent. Patents applied for. 

THE WEST HEEDLESS HOOK CO., 12 and 14 Pearl St., Council Bluffs, Iowa 



lxiv 



RECREATION. 



Anything That's Knit 





BLA WELT'S 



Hunting: and Fishing 

COATS 

THE BEST THAT'S MADE 



In Oxford Grey or Dead Grass, or 
any other color or combination of colors, 
made to your measure. 

Sweaters of all kinds — for Men, 
Women, Boys and Girls. The correct 
and comfortable garment for the seashore, 
country or mountains. 



blauvelt's hunting and fishing coat 



Good Agents Wanted 



Mail Orders Promptly* 
^/Itt ended to 



Mention Recreation 



BLAUVELT KNITTING CO. 

148 and 150 Central Ave. Newark, N. J. 




EVERY SPORTSMAN NEEDS 

A Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag 



Can be rolled into a small space 
Made to stand rough usage 
Is a perfect bed 
Absolutely keeps out moisture 



Let us send you sample of materials and price 
and prove to you how superior a KENWOOD 
BAG is to blankets or any other sleeping bag 



Write for booklet 
giving description 
ffc* i » i i 



The Kenwood Mills 
Bo* m, Albany, N,Y, 



. 



RECREATION. 



lxv 




The PHIL B. BEKEART CO. 



POWDER! POWDER! 



All kinds of powder for t 

Pistols and Shot Guns, 
measured accurately from 

i to 145 grains. 4 different measures 
in 1 . The latest and best tool. Ask 
your dealer for it. 

Every shooter should have 1. Send 3 
stamps for ideSkl HsUid Book, 146 pages 
of information Xo shooters. 

IDEAL MFG. GO., i 2 U St., New Haven, Conn., I). S. A. 

of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast 



When ycu write kindly mention Recreation 



"Colian-Oil 



ft 



preserves leather and 
renders shoes and 
harness positively 

WATERPROOF 

Used by the U. S 

the Army and Navy 
and National Guard. 

Send 25c for trial can. 
AGENTS WANTED 
Write for terms and circulars 

J. R, BUCKELEW 
Dept. A. j j j Chambers St., N. Y, 



VV&ferproof 

LEATHER 

DRESSING 

•.AND 

RUST 

PREVENTER 



I like the stand you take against the re- 
peating shot gun. I have talked against 
them for many years, and the repeating rifles 
are as bad in the de'er country. 

N. B. Anderson, Redwood Falls, Minn. 

*• 

Recreation is the best sportsmen's maga- 
zine. R. Brown, Montclair, N. J. 




EN, ATTENTION! 

Why not be your own Taxider- 
mist? Save the expense of hav- 
ing your trophies mounted. Sur- 
round yourself in the home, den 
and office, with the beautiful 
trophies secured on the hunting 
expeditions. 

We Teach Taxidermy by Mail 

Our school is endorsed by all 
leading sporting magazines and 
the most eminent taxidermists. 
Hundreds of Recreation read- 
ers are learning this interesting art under our instruc- 
tion. Would you like to double your interest in field 
sports and make your gun pay ail sporting expenses? 
Then send at once for our new illustrated catalog. 
It's free. Mention Recreation. 
The Northwestern School of Taxidermy, Inc. 
Suite A, Com. Nat. Bank, Omaha, Neb. 






"Of course," said Mrs. Longface, "it is 
awful to lose one's husband, but there is 
surely some comfort for the afflicted al- 
ways." 

"Yes," replied Rounder's widow, "it is 
something of a comfort to me to know 
where he is spending his nights now." — 
Philadelphia Press. 




Trade CEDAROLEUM Mark 

THE IDEAL CLEANER, LUBRICANT and RUST PREVENTIVE 

• it beats all," say the men who use it, and so will you 
if you give it a trial. 

It is colorless, impervious to atmosphere and salt 
water. Will not grow rancid nor evaporate. It 
has all the qualities of an up-to-date firearm lubri- 
cant. Once used, always used. One ounce tubes 
retail at 15c. and two ounce tubes at 25c. ; both 
sizes have injecting points. Will be sent you by mail, if your dealer does not carry it. 

Mention Recreation. CEDAR.OLEUM COMPANY, Perkinsville, Vt, 


BRADLEY'S ANTI-RUST ROPES! 

For SHOT GUNS, RIFLES and REVOLVERS. They cannot 
rust or pit it these ropes are used. No more worrying to keep your 
fire arms in perfect condition. Sent postpaid, $1.50 per set for Shot 
Guns; 50c. for Rifles; 25c. for Revolvers. Give gauge and length of 
barrel. Send for circular giving full particulars. 

BRADLEY'S SHOT GUN SIGHT 

Makes wing shooting easy and certain, Scores greatly increased 
at trap and in field, Instantly attachable and detachable. Price, 
post-paid, go cents. Send for circular. 

Ad4rem C. L. BRADLEY, Clarksviw-S, TKNW8SS8& 
JiJentioR &BeRgATi9H. 




lxvi 



RECREATION. 




TALKING PARROTS 

Genuine hand-raised 

MEXICAN DOUBLE 
YELLOW HEADS 

" T5he Human UalKer" 

The only kind known to iearn to talk like a 
person. Imitates the human voice to per- 
fection, learns long sentences, never forgets 
a word. 

Youngr, Tame Nestbirds, <£i (\ 

JJuring JULY and AUtiUST, only *P 1V 

Cheaper grades, from $3.50 up. 
Sent any distance in the IT. S. with perfect 
safety. Cash or C 0. D. Each parrot sold 
"with a written guarantee to talk. , 

Wausau Wis., April 4, 1904 
My D. Y. H. Parrot is not a year old and' 
says nearly everything. He is worth $100 to me, and then I would 
not sell him for that. GEOKGE S. JOHNSTON. 

Write for booklet on Parrots and Testimonials. It is free; also large 

illustrated catalogue. 
GEISLER'S BIRDSTOKE, Dept. 5, Est. 1888 09IAIIA, NEB. 

Hunting Territory 

FOR SALE. — Hunting Lodge and Block of Land 
with exclusive hunting rights to over 50 square miles 
of hunting territory in Province of Quebec, Canada, 
fronting on the Ottawa River, and convenient of access 
by water or rail. If interested address for further 
particulars. Mention Recreation. 

F. P. BRONSON, Ottawa, Canada. 

For Sale: Stevens 6 inch .22 caliber 
target pistol and holster, $3; Stevens .22 
caliber pocket pistol, $1.50; Stevens .38 cali- 
ber rimfire pocket rifle, $6; .45 caliber pow- 
der and ball revolver and bullet mould, 
$1.75. All in good condition. 

Van Allen Lyman, Albany, N. Y. 



Wanted: To purchase a Winchester re- 
peating .22 caliber rifle, take down. Man- 
ufactured previous to 1896. Good price 
paid for same. Apply "Collector," care 
of Recreation. 



For Sale: A pair of fine young timber 
wolves, perfectly tame and sociable. Cap- 
tured when one week old, now 3 months 
old. Price $50. 

E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Tex. 



For Sale: 8 Al Vista 4 B Cameras, 
new and in good condition. Cost $25 
each. Would sell for $10 each. Address, 
C. B. Hodgdon, Fort Totten, N. Y. 



SOME GOOD GUIDES. 
Following are names and addresses of 
guides who have been recommended to me, 
by men who have employed them ; together 
with data as to the species of game and 
fish which these guides undertake to find 
for sportsmen,. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides should find him incompetent or un- 
satisfactory, I will be grateful if he will 
report the fact to me : 

FLORIDA. 
C. H. Stokes, Mohawk, deer, alligators, turkey, 
quail, and snipe. 

IDAHO. 
John Ching, Kilgore, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 

mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 
Chas. Petty's, Kilgore, ditto. 
MAINE. 
H. R. Horton, Flagstaff, deer, bear, moose, cari- 
bou, fox, grouse and trout. 
Eugene Hale, Medway, ditto. 

MONTANA. 
A. R. Hague, Fridley, elk, deer, mountain sheep, 

bear, grouse and trout. 
Chas. Marble, Chestnut, ditto. 
OREGON. 
Charles H. Sherman, Audrey, bear, deer, grouse 
and trout. 

WASHINGTON. 

Munro Wyckoff, Port Townsend, deer, bear and 
grouse. 

WYOMING. 

S. N. Leek, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, mountain 

sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 

CANADA. 

Carl Bersing, Newcastle, N. B., moose, caribou, 

deer, bear and grouse. 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 
John C. LeMoine, Birchy Cove, Bay of Islands, 

caribou, salmon and trout. 
A. M. Pike, Bay of Islands, bear, caribou, sal- 
mon trout. 
John Gillard, Notre Dame Bay, ditto. 

WASHINGTON, D. C, RIFLE CLUB. 

Residents of the District of Columbia 
who would be interested in the formation 
of a club for the practice of rifle shooting 
at target, will please correspond with ^l. 
M. Kemball, 1107 G St., N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. _^_____ 

FINE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 
BIRDS, ETC., for sale at unheard-of prices. 
Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine* 



Date, 



190 



Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 23 West 24th St. New York. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which please send me RECREATION one year 

beginning with _number, 



Name,. 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN 



RECREATION. 



lxvii 




[904 Model 

LEATHER-COVERED Pneu- 

matic Recoil Pad is now per- 
fect. No pump, no valve, no 
recoil, no flinch, no headache, 
no bruised shoulders, no 
money if not satisfactory and 
returned at once. 

PRICE, $1.50 

J. R. WINTERS 

Clinton, Mo. 



KOENIG'S SHELL EXTRACTOR. 

Every shooter should 
have one — carry it in a 
vest pocket. Fits any 
gauge shell. Koenig's 
10 Cts. Postpaid. Gun Catalogue, Free. 
E'G.Koenig, new/Jersey's LargestGun House 
south broad st., newark, n. j. 




Taxidermists' <S£gS 

Oologists'aLi-vd 
Entomologists* 
Supplies 

Send 5c in stamps for catalogue 



Materials 






*A^ 




W" 


<B 


(M 


ijy- '*-•• 


#1 «!■: 


M0M 


mm 


w^ 




"z#u 


m 




sMBk. 


Hk^. 






mk. 




— JiSM 




■■^ 





FRED. KAEMPFER, 8S cU£I?m T ' 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

Mention Recreation 



INDIAN 

CURIOS 

' Wholesale & Retail 
Curio Dealers' 
hCPPLY Depot. 
Bead Work, Baskets, Elk Teeth, Mexican 
Goods, Beads, Fossils, Minerals, Arrow- 
Heads, Pottery, Alaska Ivories, Shells, 
Abates, Photos, Great Stock, Bin Cata. 5c, 
stamps. Mention Recreation. If a dealer 
say so. L w# STILWELL, 

Deadwoid .... So. Dakota 



Squabs are raised in i month, bring big 
prices. Eager market. Astonishing 
profits. Easy for women and invalids. 
Use your spare time profitably. Small 
space and capital. Here is something 
worth looking into. Facts given in our 
FREE BOOK, " How to make money 

with Squabs" PLYMOUTH ROCK 

SQUAB CO., 289 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

Indian Beadwork, Baskets, Pottery, 
Moccasins, Alaskan Curios, Mexi- 
can Goods, Beads, Basket Material. 
If it's Indian we have it. 

Send 6c. Stamps for Catalogue. 

BENHAM INDIAN TRADING CO. 

138 West 42d Street, New York City 

Mention Recreation. 



TAXI D E R.M ISTS 

Buy your 

ARTIFICIAL GLASS EYES 

direct from the manufacturer 
and dealer in 

Taxidermists' and Naturalists' Supplies 

Douglas H. Shepherd, Box 106, Taunton, Mass. 

2c, stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation 





NEWHOUSE 
STEELTRAPS 

Made since 1848 by ONEIDA COMMUNITY 




S. NEWHOUSE 

(The Old Trapper and Trapmaker) 

Fifty years ago this famous old Trapmaker of 
the Oneida Community would not let a trap 
leave his hand till he KNEW that it would hold 
any animal that got into its jaws. Even greater 
pains are taken now than then in selecting the 
finest steel and rigidly testing every part. 

This is why all experienced Trappers insist 
on having the 



it 



NEWHOUSE 



J7 



"I have seen an Indian trade his pony for one 
dozen Newhouse Traps." — Popular Magazine 
Writer. 



Eleven Sizes for Catching 
Every Fur Bearing Animal 



Every Trap Guaranteed 

Illustrated Catalogue Mailed 

l^P^Send twenty-five cents for "The Trapper's Guide," 
by S. Newhouse, telling- all about fur bearing animals 
and how to trap them, together with interesting nar- 
ratives and practical directions for life in the woods. 

Mention Recreation. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY 



ONEIDA 



NEW YORK 



lxviii 



RECREATION. 



SAUER «Sl SON 

Established 1751 

SUHX^, GERMANY 

Makers of 



1 



Fine Guns 
and Rifles 



Schoverling, Daly & Gales { 



• 



Sole Agents, 



302-304 Broadway, New York 






AN IMPORTANT OFFER 

For 2 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

I will send you 

A RIFLE WICK PLUG 

Made by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 30 caliber 
up to 50 caliber. 

OR 

A SHOT GUN WICK PLUG 

20 gauge up to 10 gauge 

Eor 3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

A Pair of Shot Gun Wick Plugs 

20 to 10 gauge. 
Sample copies for use in canvassing- furnished on 
application. 

Address RECREATION, 23W. 24th St., N .Y. City 



One day last summer I went with a 
friend to the bay a mile from here to shoot 
snipe. The birds were there in great num- 
bers and we got 20 plovers and 69 yellow 
legs. 

Clifford Hadlev, Ozone Park, Long Island, 
N. Y. 

I am sorry you did not stop when you 
got enough.. You killed at least 3 times 
as many birds as you should have killed. — 
Editor. 



"We had just a beautiful time," Anna- 
bel wrote home to her parents at Squee- 
ville. "In the evening we heard Mine. 
Human-Shriek, and afterward we had 
lunch in a Ratcellar." — Woman's Home 
Companion. 



High Grade but not High Priced 



BAKER. GUNS 
Han mer and Hammerless 



Bviilt for Hard 

Service and to 

last a lifetime 




Send for FREE QUARTERLY and 1904 Booklet Fully 
Describing all Grades with Prices. Mention Recreation. 

Baker Gun & Forging Co., .->". Batavia, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



lxix 




Grade 3 Ejector 



$60 LIST 



In presenting this gun to your notice, we feel that it is the 
best value for the money that has ever been offered. 

Excellent Damascus barrels, carefully selected, and bored 
by the particular method that has gained for the 
" Syracuse" the reputation of being the Hardest-Hitting 
gun made. Stocked with imported Walnut, Full Pistol 
Grip, handsomely checkered. 

Engraving is hand cut, and gives that finishing touch 
that proclaims quality. 

MADE IN 20, 16 OR 12 GUAGE 

SYRACUSE ARMS CO. Syracuse, n. y. 

Art Catalogue yours for the asking. Mention "Recreation" 



lxx RECREATION. 



TO 

AMATEUR 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



Here is a Chance 
to Get a 

FINE CAMERA EASILY 



A 4x5 Weno Hawk-eye film camera listing at $8, for 5 
yearly subscriptions to Recreation. A No. 3 folding Weno 
Hawk-eye film camera, listed at $15, for 10 yearly subscrip- 
tions to Recreation. 

These are both neat, compact, well-made and handsomely 
finished cameras, capable of doing high-class work. 



Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. 



Address RECREATION 

23 West 24th St, NEW YORK 



RECREATION. 



Ixxi 



JVo. 1 




1904 ART CATALOG 



Special Prices on 16 Grades Guns $17.75 to $300* 

Mention Recreation. 



ITHACA GUN COMPANY 



Ithaca, New York 



lxxii RECREATION. 



Do 

You 

Want 



If so, why not get a good 
one? 

And why not get it free of 
charge? 

This is easy. 



Any old box will answer 
£| the purpose if it does not 

leak light ; but you must 
have a fine lens to make 
a fine picture. 

YOU CAN GET 



Lens? 



A Royal Anastigmat 
Lens, 4x5, Series No. 1, 



Made by the 

Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, New York 

And listed at $45, for 15 yearly sub- 
scriptions to RECREATION 

You can get any other lens made by this Com- 
pany on a basis of one subscription to $3 of 
the list price of the lens. 

Sample copies of Eecreation for use in solicit- 
ing furnished on application. 



RECREATION. 



Ixxiii 




"Been attending the races?" asked the 
talkative man, addressing the obese pas- 
senger in the seat ahead. 

"Yes," was the laconic reply. 

"Pick any winners?" queried the garru- 
lous party. 

"Young man," replied the heavy weight, 
as he extracted a fifty-cent cigar from a 
diamond-studded case and proceeded to 
light it, "I've got a better game than try- 
ing to pick winners." 

"You don't say !" exclaimed the other. 

"Yes. I'm a bookmaker and pluck the 
losers. See?" — Chicago News. 



Your magazine suits me better than any 
other of the kind. 

O. C. Kennedy, Des Moines, la. 



The Savage Arms company, is distrib- 
uting at the St. Louis World's Fair a 
novel form of ticket. The Savage 22 cal- 
iber repeating rifle was exclusively adopted 
for the Exposition. The rifle certainly de- 
serves this, as it is a clean-cut little gun, 
shooting the best of the 22 ammunition. 
Mention Recreation and a nicely illus- 
trated catalogue will be sent you, together 
with 2 or 3 of the tickets above referred to. 
If you contemplate a trip to St. Louis it is 
well worth your time to write the Savage 
Arms Company at Utica, N. Y. This 
company's very handsome exhibit is in the 
Manufacturers' Building, Space 9B. Every 
sportsman should take the opportunity to 
see the beautiful line of rifles on exhibition 
there. These are attracting world-wide at- 
tention for their exquisite workmanship. 



THE NEW LEFEVER "'£ •'-"•Trap and Feather 




D. M. Lefever, Sons & Co 



Not connected with 
Lefever Arms Company, 



Syra.c\ise, N. Y. 



ght Field Guns 

The only American makers putting on single trigger, 
guaranteed to work perfect under all conditions. 



PRICE 
$60 TO 

$400 

Send for 
1904 

Catalogue 

Mention 
EECKEATION 



lxxiv 



RECREATION^ 



H. & R. 

"Bicycle 

Hammerless" 

Revolver 



/^> 




Description 

32 Caliber, 5 shot. 2 inch Barrel. Weight, 12 ounces. 
C. F., S. & W. Cartridge. Finish, Nickel or Blue. 

Impossible to ca.tch on the pocket and discharge accidentally. 

Absolutely Sa.fe. Although designed for cyclists, this revolver is equally adapted 
to all cases where a small, light weight, effective and handy pocket weapon is 
desired. It has a small frame and automatic ejector. Sold direct where dealers 
will not supply. Mention Recreation when writing. 

HARRINGTON $ RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 



CaaeUog for PostaJ 
Dept. R. 



MaKers ol H. & R. SINGLE GUNS 

WORCESTER, MASS. 



No Rifle complete unless mounted with one of our 

iriPROVED TELESCOPIC OUTFITS 





We make them from 3-power up. With our side 
mountings the Scope lies close to the rifle barrel and the open sights are 
left entirely clear and unobscured. 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 
Mention Recreation. 

THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPE MFG. CO. 

F. T. CORNISH, Mgr. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. S. A. 



Established 1857 



Hammerless Double 

Our Latest 

"DAVENPORT" 



Strictly , 
High 
Grade 




The W. H. Davenport Fire Arms Co. 

NORWICH. CONN. 



RECREATION. 



lxxv 



FINE GUNS, SPORTSMEN'S OUTFITS 



Other Gurvs 
Taken in 
Tra.de 



SCOTT'S MONTE CARLO 

AUTOMATIC EJECTOR HAMMER.LESS 

Also Greener, Purely, Lang, 
Colt, Parker, L. C.Smith 




Send ten cents in stamps for our new 
and beautifully illustrated catalogue of 



Fine Fishing Tackle 

Tourists' Knapsacks and Clothing Bags, Rubber Blankets, Tents, Camp Outfits 



Very light 16 and 20 bore SCOTT GUNS just received; also light 12. 
Also fine bronze metal Breech-Loading YACHT CANNON; all sizes. 
EVERYTHING FOR CAMP AND FIELD. 

WM. READ & SONS, 10? Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established 1826 



A GOOD SUBSTITUTE. 

HENRY CROCKER. 

When I am tired, and cross, and blue, 

And need a good vacation, 
But can not get away from work, 

I just read Recreation. 

I hunt, and fish, and sail, and roam 
Abroad through all creation ; 

Get rest and fun, right here at home, 
While reading Recreation. 



Recreation is the best magazine of its 
kind. 

Victor Scott, Millinockett, Me. 



Benton county is not only the home of 
the apple and other small fruits but is the 
home of game and fish as well. Our 
streams abound in bass and trout that pos- 
sess an extra fine flavor. We are 1,300 feet 
above the sea and the climate, both win- 
ter and summer, is ideal. If any reader of 
Recreation cares to know more about this 
country, let him write to me, and I will 
explain why we are able to devote so much 
time to pleasure. 

J. R. Craig, Bentonville, Ark. 



I think Recreation is worth its weight 
in gold. 

Emil Schneegass, Jersey City, N. J. 



75he PARKER. 
EJECTOR 

AUTOMATIC 

NEW YORK SALESROOM 
32 WARREN ST. 




THE PARKER. 

is absolutely and undeniably 

The Best Gun on Ea,rth 



If you would win, shoot only 
The Old Reliable 

PARKER. GUN 



PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn. 



lxxvi RECREATION. 



Another Great Offer 
to Amateur 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



A 4x5 SERIES 1 KORONA 

Listed at $12.50, for 8 yearly subscriptions to RECREATION. 

A 5x7 SERIES 1 KORONA 

Listed at $18, for 12 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 2 KORONA 

Listed at $18.50 for 14 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 3 KORONA 

Listed at $21 for 18 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 4 KORONA 

Listed at $25, for 20 yearly subscriptions, 

A 4x5 SERIES 5 KORONA 

Listed at $36, for 30 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 CYCLE POCO, No. 3 

Listed at $15, for 12 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 CYCLE POCO, No. 6 

Listed at $12.50, for 8 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 POCKET POCO B 

Listed at $10.50, for 6 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 PONY PREMO, No. 4 

Listed at $24, for 20 yearly subscriptions. 



Sample Copies for use in Canvassing- 
Furnished Free 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 

33 W. 24th St,.. New York City 



RECREATION. 



lxxvii 




. 



Loaded Shells Smokeless Powder Empty Shells 

The Robin Hood Powder Co. 

Swan ton, Vt. 



lxxviii 



RECREATION. 




" The Dining Car '* 



Budweiser 

is served on all 

Buffet, Dining and 

Pullman Cars, 

Ocean, Lake and 

River Steamers, 

and 
at all first-class 
Hotels, Cafes and 
Restaurants. 




King of Bottled Beers" 



Travelers will find that Budweiser is obtainable 
almost everywhere — at home and abroad. It is 
served in the best hotels and cafes of the principal 
foreign cities and seaports. 

Wherever you are located, there is a distributor 
conveniently near, who will supply you with 
Budweiser. If you do not know his name, write to us. 

Anheuser-Busch Brewing Ass'n 

St. Louis, U.S.A. 



Visitors to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition are cordially invited to inspect the Anheuser-Busch 
Brewery, where competent gruides, speaking all modern languages, will be at their service. 




Fishing Free to Everybody 

The. Park j'sjhe Angler's Delight 

new hotels— new roads 
;new and reduced rates 

Send 6 .cents for "WONDERLAND 1904"; 

135 cents for "PANORAMIC YELLOWSTONE 

(PARK", a : colored . artistic picture; 50 - cents' 

for "WILD FLOWERS FROM_YELLOWSTONE." 

A.lCCLELAND 

GEN'L PASSG'R AG'!. 

t," , _ ST. PAUL, MINN. 

MSIT THE LEWIS & CLARK EXPOSITION 
PORTLAND, ORE.JN 1905— 



.m'r Y 



CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS, NEW YORK 




All overthe civilized world 

THE IMPROVED 

BOSTON 
GARTER 

IS KNOWN AND WORN\ 
Every Pair Warranted I 

"^■H The Name is e I 



stamped on every 
loop — 



CUSHION 
BUTTON 



Lies flat to the leg — never 
Slips, Tears nor Unfastens 

ALWAYS EASY 



Send 

50c. for Silk, 
25c. for Cotton, 
Sample Pair. 

REFUSE ALL SUBSTITUTES 



GEO. FROST CO., Makers, 
Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




COOL 
PROPOSITION 



Surprisi ng how 
cool, yet full of ener- 
gy and "go" one feels 
when the hot weather diet is 
— ] selected with reason. For 
breakfast 

A Little Fruit* Soft Boiled Eggs. 

Saucer of GRAPE-NUTS and Cream. 

Toast Whole Wheat Bread or Zweibach. 

Cup of POSTUM. 

All the necessary food elements here 
to keep Body and Brain well nourished 
and strong until the noon hour, no matter 
what the work. 

An ideal hot weather lunch, too, for the 
same important reasons. 

Grape-Nuts 



SJN 



s tRVE" 




'Ready to Serve" 

CHOCOLATE POWDER 

Made from PURE COCOA, SUGAR and CREAM. 

QUALITY 8 PURITY UNEXCELLED. 
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS a GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 



ED. PJLNAUDS 




EAU DE 



HAIR TONIO 

is a pure and infallible vegetable- compound, intended for curing all _ 
forms of DANDRUFF. It positively makes hair grow luxuriantly 
by keeping the scalp in healthy condition. It is furthermore an ex- 
cellent hair dressing, and the refined odor which it leaves in the hair 
makes it a toilet luxury. OVER 150,000 BOTTLES SOLD IN ONE I 

MAMTTJ T1VT <T.TTT^ *T VTT<T.T^T-i o o-T a m f? O 



cellent hair dressing, and the refined odor which it leavesjn thehair 
makes it a toilet luxury. OVER 150,000 '. 
MONTH IN THE UNITED STATES. 

FOR SALE EVERYWHERE 
4-oz. bottle, ,50 - 8-oz. bottle, $1.00 

FREE SAMPLE mailed on receipt of 6c. to pay postage and pack- 
ing, Address Ed. Pinaud's Importation Offices, 
fill. Ave. and 14th St. ED. PINAUD.BLDG 



: 




vose 



PIANOS 



have been established over SO YEARS. Byoursy 
tern of payments every family in moderate circuit 
stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old instr 

ments in exchange and deliver the new piano in your home free of expens 

Write for catalogue D and explanations. 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass 



VOLUME XXI. 
NUMBER 2 



AUGUST, 1904 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 






Published by 6. 0. Shields (Coqvina), 23 west 24m street, new york 



) Blackpad, the Leader of the V ; ac. allen%i°«s an Ambitious B,ack Duck ' by 



illustrated by WILHOT TOWNSEND 



m 



'M 



** Leading a Dog's 



9» 



wouldn't be so bad if all dog owners were dog lovers. But, unfortunately, 
there are many people with hearts so small and minds so dull that they 
don't appreciate a dog's real worth. They neglect their dogs, treat them 
unkindly, and, if they fall sick, drive them away to cure themselves or die. 

A sick dog ought to receive attention as well as a sick man. There 
are ways of curing dogs' diseases and saving dogs' lives, just as there are 
ways of treating and curing men. 

The greatest remedy known for all the ailments that afflict the canine 
race is 

Sergeant's ^ 
Condition Pills 

This great remedy combines all the elements that are necessary in 
the treatment of nine-tenths of dog diseases. It is a tonic, builds up 
strength, gives appetite, makes the dog bright, active and full of vigor. No 
other medicine is so valuable for keeping dogs in perfect health; no other 
medicine has such a remarkable record of cures. 

Price, $*50 and $1.00, postpaid anywhere 

Serg'eant's Sure Snot 

Canine worms kill many valuable dogs. Not only puppies, but grown 
dogs are afflicted, and often when a dog is suffering from this cause, his 
owner is at a loss to understand what the matter is. The more prominent 
symptoms of worms are nausea, colic, pains, restlessness, feverishness 
and abnormal appetite. Many varieties of worms infect dogs, but Sergeant's 
Sure Shot kills them all. It is safe, harmless and, used in conjunction 
with Sergeants Conditfon Pills, is all that a dog needs to make him well. 

Price, $.50, postpaid anywhere 

Send 3 cents for postage and we will send you, free, our handsome 
Book on Dogs, and a Pedigree Blank. 

Our remedies are on sale at leading drug stores and sporting goods 
dealers, or will be sent postpaid by us on receipt of price. 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO. Sol* Proprietors of Sergeant's Dog Remedies RICHMOND, VA, 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1903, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



J1.00 A Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 



PAGE. 



There We Were, Perched Like 2 Monkeys, on the Back of the Buggy Seat Frontispiece 

A Treacherous Ferry.,... W W. Bridgers 

A Big One That Did Not Get Away H. B. Landgraf 

Blackpad, the Leader of the V. Illustrated E. C. Allen 

Canoeing in Georgian Bay G. H. Hodgetts 

King's Ex. Poem : Edwin L. Sabin 

A Bald-Faced Grizzly and Three Others G. B. McClellan 

How Some Tenderfeet Hunt Bear. Illustrated Frank Seaman 

A Prairie Life. Illustrated Hattie Washburn 

A Cruise That Began E. D. H. 

The Rustic's Complaint. Poem H. P. Van Arsdale 

Ptarmigan Shooting in the Yukon Delta Fred. G. Park 

Camping in the Adirondacks • Sycamore 

Fisherman's Luck. Poem Frederick O. Martin 

Our Annual Camping Trip... Alfred C Fox 

No Damages Assessed John C. McNeill 



69 
73 
75 
79 
80 



°3 

87 



From the Game Fields 99 

Fish and Fishing 105 

Guns and Ammunition • 109 

Natural History ...- 113 

The League of American Sportsmen 116 

Forestry 118 

Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17, 1 



92 

93 
94 
96 

97 
128 

Pure and Impure Foods 120 

Book Notices . 122 

Puhlisher's Notes $...-. 123 

Editor's Corner 125 

Amateur Photography 130 




Ivy orOak Poisoning 

immediately relieved and quickly 



cured by 



THE FASTENER WITH 
A BULL-DOG GRIP 

Washburne f s 



Patent 

Improved 



Fasteners 



Men firvd comfort and xitility in their vise. 
Applied to 

Key Chain and Ring, - 25c. 
Cuff Holders, - - - 20c. 
Scarf Holders, - - - 10c. 
Drawers Supporters, - 20c. 

LITTLE, BUT NEVER LET GO. 

Sent Postpaid. Catalogue Free. Sold Everywhere. 

American Ring Company, 

Dept. 44 Waterbury, Conn. 



Hydrozone 

Harmless, although a most powerful 
healing agent. 

I will send on receipt of io cents to 
pay postage, 

A Trial Bottle Free. 

Send for it now. It will immediately 
relieve and promptly cure Insect Bites, 
Hives, Prickly Heat, Sunburn, etc. 

Sold by leading druggists. 

None genuine without ray signature. 

F-59 Prince St., New York. 

Send fop Booklet on "How to treat diseases,** 
containing: hundreds of testimonials of wonder. 
ful cures. 



11 



RECREATION. 



Everything the 



Camper Needs 



SEND ioc for our new cata- 
logue "R," 240 pages of infor- 
mation useful to the Camper, 
Hunter, Fisherman, Canoeist, 
and all those who live out-of- 
doors, also to those who use 
Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, 
CanoeSjTentSj Clothing, Cooking 
Outfits, Sleeping Bags, Stoves, 
Pack-saddles, Pneumatic Beds 
and Cushions, etc., etc. 



T^Yf^f* with every purchase 
to the amount of ten 
dollars, we will include a repro- 
duction of this picture, 11x18 
inches, drawn by Thomas Fo- 



■■'■ ■; ,. r 





garty, for "The Forest," by Stewart Edward White. Every 
lover of nature should make this book a part of his outfit. 
Price, $1.50. Mention Recreation. 

ABERCROMBIE & FITCH 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

COMPLETE OUTFITS for 

EXPLORERS, CAMPERS AND PROSPECTORS 

314-316 Broadway, New York 



RECREATION. 



111 




IV 



RECREATION. 






To the 

World's Fair 

St. Louis 

The very best facilities for comfort- 
able, pleasant and prompt journeys be- 
tween the East and St. Louis are provided 
by the Lake Shore's train service, the 
most extensive and complete of any line. 

Fast through trains from New York, 
Boston, Buffalo, etc., in connection with 
the New York Central and Boston & 
Albany roads and the Big Four Route. 

Choice of routes via Cleveland, Toledo 
or Chicago. Tickets reading over 

The Lake Shore 

& Michigan Southern Railway 

afford stop-overs at Niagara Falls, Lake 
Chautauqua, Put-in-Bay and Chicago 
(not to exceed 10 days in either direction 
at latter place.) 

Tickets sold at points east of Buffalo 
give option of going by rail or steamer 
either way between Buffalo and Cleve- 
land with extra charge. 

For your trip. To assist in arranging your trip 
get a copy of our book about the World's Fair, contain- 
ing a complete colored map of grounds and other useful 
matter; also book entitled "List of Hotels, Boarding and 
Rooming Houses in St. Louis," with rates, etc., and 
"Book of Trains." Above sent to any address for four 
cents postage to cover mailing cost. 

A. J. SMITH, G. P. & T. A., Cleveland, O. 






Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 



FOUNTAIN 
PEN 

Guaranteed Finest 
Grade 14k. 

SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 

RECREATION 

as an advertising medium 
we offer your choice of 



m 



THnagCTPTflQ 




Those 
Two 
Popular 
Styles 
For Only 



$1.00 

M Postpaid 
to any 
Address 

(By registered mail, 8c. extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. geld pen, 
any flexibility desired — 
in feeding device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY 
GOLD HOUNTED for 

piesentation purposes, 
$1.00 extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find 
it as represented, fully 
as fine a value as you 
can secure for three times 
the price in any other 
make, if not entirely sat- 
isfactory in every respect, 
return it and we will sena 
you $i.io for it, the extra 
ioc. is Jor your trouble in 
zvriting us and to show otir 
confidence in the Laughlin 
Pen — (Not one .customer 
in 5,000 has asked for his 
money back.) 

Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder sent 
free of charge with each Pen 



.:;;ii,: : l 



v ' 



ADDRESS 



Laughlin T\i%. Co. 

4-22 Griswold St., DETROIT, MICH. 



RECREATION. 



RACINE BOAT MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

■ MUSI4EGON, MICHIGAN ===== 




Our Turbine Motor. Hunting Boat, as shown above, is 16 feet long, draws loaded only 
lOinchesof water, is fitted with our 3 H.P. motor and underwater exhaust. No springs, no 
valves, no clicks — as noiseless as a Row Boat. Speed 6 mibs per hour. _ Operation and 
satisfaction guaranteed for $275. Cheaper ones if you want them. 




Our Canvas Cedar Paddling Canoe, as shown above, is 14 feet long, will carry four in 
a pinch and is built for service. A comfortable and easy paddler. Price, F. 0. B., $30— 
no extras. 




Our Still Hunter, as shown, 1 1 x /z feet long, 
36 inches wide, built of White Cedar, will 
carry 600 lbs., weight only 80 lbs. Ample 
room under deck for decoys. Light weight, 
light draught, very stiff, very still and very 
cheap. Price, complete with paddle $20, 
F-.O.B. 



Our 15 foot Fishing Motor Boat is the 
"limit." Has 4 foot beam, draws 12 inches, 
speed 6 miles per hour, seats four to 
five, will carry 1,000 lbs. 1 H.P. motor, 
operation guaranteed. Built of Cedar, nat- 
ural finish, brass trimmed, a good troller, a 
good guide to the fishing grounds and a sure 
returner. We have them in stock at our 
various warehouses — price $165 Money refunded if not satisfied. 

Send :0c. for our 64 page catalog describing the others, and we will tell you the 
address of our nearest showrooms. If you haven't the stamps handy drop a postal. 

Mention Recreation. 

Address: RACINE BOAT MFG. CO., (Riverside) MUSKEGON, MICH. 




VI 



RECREATJOS 




* Wing 
Ipiano 

is a joy in any household. You can get a strictly high- 
grade piano by writing us direct and can save$ioo 
to $200 on it. Sent on trial. We pay freight. Easy 
monthly payments. No money required in advance. 
In 36 years we have sold 33,000 pianos and refer to 
over 33,000 satisfied purchasers. Wing Pianos are 
guaranteed for 12 years. "Book of Information about 
Pianos" sent free on request Mention Recreation. 



TOling & Son 

350 to 356 TOI. 13tb St. 



1Hcw York 



RECREATION. vii 



" The Nation's pleasure ground and sanitarium." — David Bennett Hill. 



THE 

ADIRONDACK 

MOUNTAINS 



The lakes and streams in the Adirondack 
Mountains are full of fish ; the woods are inviting, 
the air is filled with health, and the nights are 
cool and restful. If you visit this region once, 
you will go there again. An answer to almost 
any question in regard to the Adirondacks will be 
found in No. 20 of the "Four-Track Series/' 
"The Adirondack Mountains and How to Reach 
Them;" issued by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL 



A copy will be mailed free, upon receipt of a two-cent stamp, by George H. 
Daniels, General Passenger Agent, Grand Central Station, New York. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 



J 

$ 



COUNT GASSINI SAYS: 

Russian Imperial Embassy, Washington. 
The HAYNER WHISKEY which has been used at the Russian 
-Embassy has given universal satisfaction. ^y, a^^T) 

It is an admirable household whiskey. /-o 

Russian Ambassador. 

THE ONLY WHISKEY WITH A NATIONAL REPUTATION FOR 
HIGHEST QUALITY AND PERFECT PURITY. 

Government statistics show that the famous Miami Valley produces better grain and 
has purer water than any other section of this country. It is Nature's garden. Right. in 
the heart of this favored spot is our distillery. We have at our very door the two essen- 
tials for producing the finest whiskey in the world-the best grain and the purest water. 
Add to these one of the most completely equipped distilleries ever operated and an ex- 
perience of 38 years in distilling whiskey and you have a combination that is unequaled 
anywhere. That's why HAYNER WHISKEY is the best for medicinal and other uses. That's 
why we have over half a million satisfied customers. That's why YOU should try it. 
Don't forget that it goes direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, 
richness and flavor, carries a UNITED STATES REGISTERED DISTILLER'S GUARANTEE of PURITY and 
AGE and saves the dealers' enormous profits. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

FULL QUARTS $ 

EXPRESS CHARGES PAID BY US. 




I 




OUR OFFER 



We will send you FOUR FULL QUART BOTTLES of HAYNER SEVEN- 

YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20. and we will pay the express charges. 
Try it and if you don't find it all right and as good as you ever used or can buy 
from anybody else at any price, then send it back at. our expense and your 
$3.20 will be returned to you by next mail. Just think that offer over. How 
could it be fairer? If you are not perfectly satisfied you are not out a cent. 
We ship in a plain sealed case, no marks to show what's inside. 

Orders for Ariz., Cal., Col., Idaho. Mont.. Nev..N.Mex.. Ore., Utah., Wash., or Wvo. 
must be on the basis of 4 QUARTS for $4.00 by EXPRESS PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by 
FREIGHT PREPAID. * 



ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY 
TROY, OHIO. 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO., ST. PAUL, MINN., ATLANTA, GA., 

J 



$3^3^te^te£?&3^te^*30?*3^te^ 





THERE WE WERE, PERCHED LIKE 2 MONKEYS ON THE BACK OF THE BUGGY SEAT. 

68 



Volume XXI. 



RECREATION. 

AUGUST, J904 
G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager 



Number 2 



A TREACHEROUS FERRY. 



W. W. BRIDGERS. 



In the latter part of September, 
1901, I was one of a party of 4 who 
took a trip of 20 miles up the Rio 
Grande in quest of Chicks. Our des- 
tination was a certain lake in Dona 
Ana county, New Mexico, situated 
on the opposite side of the river from 
El Paso. The road leading up to the 
lake took us to a point about 2 miles 
above, where we had to cross the 
river and drive down to our destina- 
tion. None of the party had ever be- 
fore been to the lake in question, and 
our progress was to some extent the 
result of guesswork, as wagon roads 
led in numerous directions and there 
was but one route to the lake after 
turning into the river bottom. It 
was impossible to take a crosscut, as 
it was not safe to cross the river ex- 
cept at some recognized ford, and be- 
cause the numerous bosques (dense 
growths of Mexican mesquite or tor- 
nilla) made progress- next to imposs- 
ible except over traveled roads. We 
took the wrong road once and had 
much trouble and delay in getting 
back on the right track ; but finally 
we reached the crossing we had been 
directed to take. 

The Rio Grande, much akin to the 
Nile, had, some weeks previous, been 
out of its banks at certain points, but 
was clearly fordable at that time and 
place. We crossed without incident, 
but many troubles lay ahead of us. 
Immediately in front of us was a 
small Mexican village, nestling at the 
foot of the hills. There were a dozen 
or more small adobe houses, stern, 
uncouth and uncivilized in appear- 



ance, emphasizing the solitude of the 
country and the inactivity of the na- 
tive inhabitants. There were no 
farms nor other evidences of indus- 
try to be seen. Untouched by the 
magic spark of civilization and prog- 
ress, the inhabitants, though almost 
within sight of a thriving, prosper- 
ous, bustling and active city, were 
content to live as their forefathers 
had lived, whiling away the weeks 
and years in idleness, ignorance and 
superstition. The inevitable adobe 
church, with its weather beaten and 
time worn cross above the door, was 
only about 200 yards distant, directly 
on the road in front of us. Between 
us and the church, however, as we 
afterward learned to our chagrin, 
was an impassable gulf of thick, 
crusted mud. We suspected the diffi- 
culties that confronted us, but did 
not doubt that we should make the 
passage, as the road seemed to have 
been recently traveled. We drove 
ahead, but the front buggy was soon 
in the mud up to the hubs and one of 
the horses was down and unable to 
rise. There was nothing left to do 
but for all hands to wade in, unhar- 
ness the horses and back the buggy 
out. The 4 of us had enough exer- 
cise in the next 30 minutes to have 
trained Jeffries for a $50,000 prize 
fight. 

We were a sorry, sick looking, 
mud-bespattered lot when we had 
completed the task and were again 
ready to resume the journey; but, 
valiant hunters that we were, noth- 
ing could daunt us, and after a brief 



69 



70 



RECREATION. 



breathing spell we were ready to 
make another start. It was evident, 
however, that we were between the 
devil and the aeep blue sea. On one 
side was a river, which we thought 
had to be crossed at that particular 
place, and on the other was an im- 
passable mud slough which seemed to 
hem us in on all sides. It was grow- 
ing late in the afternoon and we yet 
had a hard drive of several miles 
through the sand hills ahead of us, 
to say nothing of crossing the slough. 
A brief investigation satisfied us that 
the only hope of getting across was 
to drive down the river. That we 
did, only to discover that we were cut 
off in that direction, for there the 
slough joined the river. While de- 
bating what was best to do a bunch 
of redheads flew by and I knocked 
one with each barrel, making 2 very 
pretty shots. 

The sight of ducks set our blood 
leaping and we determined to do or 
die right- then and there. We found 
a narrow place in the slough and cut- 
ting a number of weeds we laid them 
on top of the mud. We then led the 
horses across, and by hand pushed 
and pulled the buggies as far out as 
possible. After that we tied ropes 
to the buggies, hitched them to the 
horses and finally succeeded in reach- 
ing the opposite shore. We were en- 
gaged in that work about an hour and 
when the task was completed we 
were all exhausted. However, the 
lake was then almost within sight and 
we felt that the next day's sport 
would more than compensate us for 
the trials and tribulations we had un- 
dergone. 

All our troubles up to that time had 
been due largely to some Mexicans 
who had not directed us to the proper 
crossing. Our disgust was deep when 
we learned later that had we crossed 
the river 200 yards higher up w r e 
would have had a clean, clear road and 
no obstacles to impede our progress. 
On account of the vexatious delays ex- 
perienced we did not reach our des- 



tination until dark, but we had the 
satisfaction of learning from a Mexi- 
can who lived on the banks of the 
lake that there were plenty of ducks. 
We fed our horses, cooked supper, 
and, tired and sore, were soon asleep 
and dreaming of the morrow. 

The next morning we were astir 
long before daylight, and when the 
first streak of dawn shot above the 
mountain range East of us I was 
standing on the shore of the lake in 
keen anticipation of the first shot. I 
soon perceived a bunch of ducks, high 
above, coming from up the river and 
direct for my blind, affording me 2 
shots. During the next half hour 
hundreds passed over me, but I was 
not bagging any game. I must have 
fired at least 25 times before I began 
to realize that I would have to change 
my tactics, for up to that time I had 
only crippled 2 ducks, which, in my 
excitement, I made no effort to get. 
In fact, I was too busy shooting to 
pay any attention to cripples ; but 
when I looked down at my feet, saw 
a box of empty shells and realized 
that I had not bagged a single duck 
I decided to cool off and do better, 
for I was sure the other boys had 
loads of game. It was a shameful 
satisfaction to me to learn later, that 
they had been doing about as badly 
as I had. The truth was that in the 
early morning light we had all been 
deceived as to the range. The lake 
is surrounded by hills which rise 100 
feet or more above the water, and 
ducks coming looked much lower than 
they really were. 

I took a survey of the lake. It 
was only a temporary body of water 
which had formed from recent rains^^ 
but was 3 feet deep in places and cov- 
ered 15 or 20 acres of ground. In the 
center, covering about half the lake, 
was a growth of mesquite and weeds, 
and a more ideal place for a blind 
could not be imagined. The mes- 
quites grew on little hills, and in be- 
tween were strips of water where the 
ducks were alighting. I waded 



A TREACHEROUS EERRY. 



7i 



across to one of the mesquite hillocks 
and for 2 hours had some excellent 
shooting. As I was the only one in 
the party who had rubber boots I had 
a practical monopoly of the shooting. 
The others had to content themselves 
as best they could on the outer shores. 
I bagged about 25 ducks and had the 
pleasure of making some beautiful 
shots, as well as the embarrassment 
of having the boys see me make some 
awful misses. When we returned 
home that night, we had, all told, 
about 50 ducks, and 15 quails which 
we killed on the road back. We 
stopped just out of town, under an 
electric light, to divide our game, and 
while counting it out 3 other parties 
of hunters came by. They had not 
killed anything and their remarks as 
they stopped to size up our pile, 
which looked wonderfully large, de- 
lighted us. We cheerfully lied to 
them as to where we had killed the 
ducks, which we said was just where 
they had been hunting. They thought 
it strange they could not find any- 
thing when it was evident that game 
was so plentiful. We were extreme- 
ly sympathetic with them and agreed 
that it was strange indeed they had 
been so unfortunate. Before sepa- 
rating for home we each solemnly 
pledged the others that we would not 
give the snap away, but somehow the 
secret got out and within the next 2 
weeks half the shooters in town had 
visited the scene of our success. 
They returned practically empty 
handed, however, as the ducks had 
already gone South, we probably 
having frightened away all we did 
not kill. 

Ducks are not plentiful in this im- 
mediate locality, though in September 
and the early part of October we fre- 
quently have fair shooting, provided 
the fall rains put any water into the 
lakes. A few days afterward 2 of us 
attempted to make a sneak back to the 
lake in question, so we could have a 
good shoot all by ourselves, but we 
failed to reach our destination. We 



decided to take a nearer route, which 
compelled us to cross the river 3 times. 
At the first ford we succeeded in 
crossing, but not without wetting our 
bed clothes, ammunition and grub. 
We had a choice lot of sugar, coffee, 
crackers, etc., after it had been ducked 
in the chocolate-colored water of the 
Rio Grande ; but we were still brave 
and had visions of more ducks. Af- 
ter a brief council of war we solemnly 
resolved never to turn back. We 
drove valiantly into the nextf ford, 
perched on the back of the buggy seat 
and swearing we were going to stay 
with it. When the water struck the 
buggy seat again and everything de- 
pended on the steady stride of the old 
mare, she balked, and in answer to the 
whip she kicked the singletree in 2 
and snapped some of the harness. 
There we were, perched like 2 mon- 
keys on the back of the buggy seat, 
the current carrying the buggy down 
stream and threatening to turn us 
over, and the old mare cutting up all 
kinds of antics. I hastily climbed out 
of the buggy and into the water, not 
taking time to don my bathing-suit. 
The water was swift, deep and chilly, 
but it made no difference, as the situ- 
ation imperatively called for prompt 
and effective action. I cut some of 
the harness, and the mare, thus re- 
leased, forded the river like a veteran, 
leaving us and the buggy in the mid- 
dle of the river, with a horse on the 
opposite side. Turning the buggy 
with the current, we soon had it out 
on the bank, after which I swam the 
river and returned with the horse. 
During this performance we played to 
a delighted audience of Mexicans who 
lined the river bank, shouted all man- 
ner of gratuitous pleasantries to us, 
and were as entertaining as possible, 
having fallen in with the spirit of the 
free exhibition we were giving. 

While we were engaged in patching 
the harness and buggy, one of the na- 
tives shouted across to us that the riv- 
er was rising, and thus cheered our 
dampened spirits, although just before 



72 



RECREATION. 



we had crossed another hombre had 
told us that wagons had been crossing 
all the morning and that the river was 
falling. The news that the river was 
rising did not add any pleasure to our 
predicament, as we were compelled to 
cross the river again if we would re- 
turn home. There was no way to 
avoid it ; so, cold, wet and bedraggled, 
we proceeded with our preparations to 
give another impromptu performance. 
We hitched up the old mare again, but 
at the first cluck she did some more 
kicking and broke some more harness. 
That settled it. We then succeeded 



in hiring a Mexican to come across to 
us with a little pony and some harness, 
and thus we finally gained the other 
shore, I again swimming the river, 
just to keep in practice, and my com- 
panion carrying our effects across on 
the old mare's back. That put us on 
the high road home. Luckily we did 
not lose our guns, so we consoled our- 
selves with the thought that it was not 
so bad as it might have been. Dark- 
ness favored us as we returned home 
that night, wringing wet and shiver- 
ing cold. That was my last duck 
hunt. 




AM'T'IW PHOTO BY GARDNER CORNETT. 

THE LONE FISHERMAN. 



Winner of 21st Prize in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 



A DIG ONK THAT DID XOT CKT AWAY. 



H. 13. LAN DC RAF. 



Mr. William Locraft, popularly known as 
Uncle Billy, and 1 had been planning a 
trip up river for sonic time. On receipt of 
a telegram from our old friend, George 
Walters, that the water was in condition 
and the bass were biting freely, we gathered 
our traps, hied away to the railroad station 
and boarded the 5 130 p. m. train for Dicker- 
son's station. There we found George, Jr., 
awaiting us. 

We climbed aboard the wagon and drove 
2 miles to the old familiar house which 
stands on the bank a short distance from 
the junction of the Monocacy and the Po- 
tomac rivers. 

Early the next morning we were at the 
river. It was an ideal day for bass. There 
was a light frost on the ground and the air 
was sharp and crisp. As I shoved the boat 
out in the stream, Uncle Billy said, 

"Son, one of us is due for a whopper 
to-day." 

Uncle Billy rowed while I trolled as far 
as Red Rock, catching a small bass on the 
way down. We cast anchor at a favor- 
ite hole, fished it half an hour, and I caught 
another small bass. We moved about fre- 
quently on the way, catching occasional 
bass, until I had 6, but not even a nibble 
for Uncle Billy. 

At 3 o'clock we were gradually working 
upstream toward the house ; also toward a 
favorite spot where we seldom failed to 
hook a bass. Uncle Billy remarked, 

"It appears you have it on me this trip." 

We anchored again, and he got his first 
strike, which was- a good one. He hung 
the fish but, unfortunately, lost him, the 
fish running under a snag, part of which 
Uncle Billy brought up on his line. The 
most patient and optimistic of anglers, he 
was plainly nettled at his persistent ill luck, 
for it is unusual for him not to have the 
majority catch in any company. 

AYe finally anchored at our favorite last 
chance, as we term it, and Uncle Billy said, 

"Son, it's now or never." 

Selecting the largest smelt in the pail,- 
he fastened it on the hook, spitting on It 
for luck, and cast toward the Maryland 
shore. He then lit a cigar and began a 
discourse on the uncertainties of life, ang- 
ling in particular, when suddenly his reel 
shrieked. He turned pale and shook as if 



he had the ague. The fish ran out fully 
IOO feet of line before Uncle Billy could 
check him. Me was extraordinarily active 
for a fish of his size and weight, practicing 
all the tricks of his kind, several times 
leaping clear of the water in his efforts to 
free himself of the hook, sulking and lying 
back like a jackass, refusing to be coaxed 
or forced. 

Uncle Billy was not so confident as usual 
concerning the outcome ; he was visibly 
nervous, though he afterward swore he had 
never been more composed in his life. 
After a spirited and exciting contest of 20 
minutes, the bass succumbed to the supe- 
rior skill of the veteran, and was brought 
to net, defeated, but not conquered, for as 
he lay on the bottom of the boat gasping 
for air, he made a last desperate flop and 
came near going over the side. 

After firmly securing him to avoid an- 
other story of how the big one got away, 
we hoisted anchor and pulled for the house 
where congratulations were in order. 

The next day we departed, with a hearty 
invitation to return soon and duplicate the 
feat. Arriving in due time at Dickerson's, 
we boarded the train, proud and happy. 
Had we been inclined to gamble we could 
have won considerable money, as there was 
a party of anglers in the forward car, one 
of whom had caught a 5 T 4 pound bass at 
Pomt of Rocks. They were anxious to bet 
their clothes that their bass was the largest 
fish on the train, until they saw our cham- 
pion. For the rest of the homeward jour- 
ney Uncle Billy was kept busy telling about 
his capture. 

Uncle Billy presented his fish to the 
Smithsonian institution, where it is now 
on exhibition. The officials v-ere highly 
pleased to receive so fine a specimen and 
awarded him a diploma, also stating that 
it was the largest fish of its kind on record 
ever taken with hook and line from the 
Potomac or any of its tributaries. It is 
tagged as follows : 

Species, small mouth bass, Microptcnis 
dolomiei. Weight, 6]A pounds; length, 22]A 
inches. Tackle, Bristol steel rod. Von 
Hofe reel. No. 44 braided silk Kingfisher 
line, No. 30 New York bass hook. Bait, 
live smelt. Caught, November 1, 1903. 



"Aren't you afraid of catching cold? 
This room is like a barn." 

"That's all right. I'm working like a 
horse." — Harvard Lampoon. 
73 




w 

< 
P 

P 

P 

o 
o 



o 

P 

w 

p^ 

Ph 

o 

P 



74 



BLACKPAD, THE LEADER OF THE V. 



E. C. ALLEK. 



It was late spring. Far back from the 
coas 1 : the cinnamon ferns in the swamps had 
lost all their graceful curls, and had spread 
forth to catch every beam of sunshine that 
tillered through the dense growth above. 
Along the brooks the lily pads were creep- 
ing close to the surface of the water. 

One of these brooks, after flowing several 
miles through a mixed forest of hemlock, 
spruce, and hard woods, emerged into a 
long, grassy meadow, in which it broadened 
out and flowed slowly, as if unwilling to 
leave the warm spring sunshine ; then, dis- 
appearing into the forest again, flowed off 
to join its sister streams on their journey 
to the sea. 

At the upper end of the meadow, and at 
the edge of the thicket, was an old maple 
that had been uprooted by a heavy wind 
years before. Under the trunk and down 
near the gnarled roots, with the dead 
meadow grass and low bushes forming an 
excellent screen, was the future mother 
of the leader of the V sitting quietly on II 
pale blue eggs. Only a wily old black duck. 
She had little fear, for the nesting place 
had been well chosen, and her dark brown, 
buff margined feathers blended perfectly 
with the dead leaves and dead meadow 
grass. She had seen nothing of her mate 
since she had begun her faithful watch over 
her treasure, though she had sometimes 
heard his loud "quack, quack," and the 
whistle of his wings, as he sailed down into 
the brook on his return from the coast. 
Of this she cared little. She was anxiously 
listening for the sound that would tell her 
she would soon be the mother of as large 
a family as any old duck could properly 
care for. 

At last it came ; only a faint tapping on 
the inside of a shell. This was followed 
by another, then another, which soon de- 
veloped into quite a commotion, as n 
downy, dusky babies burst their bonds and 
struggled for an entrance into a sunny but 
cruel world. 

The following morning, after a careful 
survey to see that the coast was clear, 
Madam Duck led her offspring from the 
shelter of the old maple, toward the brook, 
for their first lesson in discovering food on 
its muddy bottom. No lesson was needed 
in swimming, although they had never 
seen water. The way to the brook was 
so selected that every convenient bush 
aided to conceal the duck family. It 
needed but the stirring of a branch or bit 
of grass to bring the head of the dusky 
mother into an erect, watchful position. 



What living creature can be more rigid than 
a black duck or a bittern, scenting danger. 
Despite the efforts of the mother to make 
a guarded advance and yet keep at the 
head of her family, or rather keep them in 
her rear, one youngster, who, like many a 
youth of our own species, considered the 
ways of his parent too slow, persisted in 
forcing himself in advance of her, and 
actually, on reaching the brook, tumbled in 
without any attempt at secrecy. This 
youngster was Blackpad, who was destined 
to be the leader of his clan ; but he still had 




WlLfloffc 



BLACKPAD TUMBLED IN WITHOUT ANY AT- 
TEMPT AT SECRECY. 

to learn that life in the forest was a wild, 
wary fight for existence. 

What a jolly day that was, and how they 
enjoyed themselves, ducking their heads 
into the clear water and throwing it over 
their backs, or probing the soft bottom for 
insects, roots or water snails. The suc- 
ceeding early summer days were full of 
enjoyment. The nights were spent in 
some convenient clump of bushes, far 
enough back from the brook to be off the 
highway of the crafty mink and other night 
prowlers, who had their paths along its 
borders. How Blackpad enjoyed those 
cool summer evenings, as, nestled close 
to his mother, he listened to the piping 
of the frogs down in the brook, and the 
sweet flutelike notes of the hermit thrushes 
on the edge of the woods. Then when the 
thrushes ceased and the stars came out, he 
would push his bill under his stub of a 
wing and forget the brook, and the thrushes, 
and the stars. 

One morning while the family was tak- 



75 




< 

i—i 

Pi 

< 

P 

a 

Q 
W 

PL, 
< 

en 
> 

d 

O 
H 



Q 



BLACKPAD, THE LEADER OF THE V. 



77 



Ing its usual meal from the brook, Black- 
pad seemed to feel a sense of danger; and 
though the others were feeding as usual, 
he watched the shore intently. Presently 
something yellow crept from behind a rock 
and couched under the bushes on the very 
edge of the bank. With a shrill "peer., 
peet," Blackpad was under water; and, 
coming up under cover of the projecting 
bank, on the farther side of the brook, he 
turned to look at the yellow monster. Then 




YJilniotTdyMsehd 






THE YELLOW PERIL. 

he saw what made his heart almost stop 
beating. Creeping up the other bank of the 
brook was a large, yellow, furry animal, 
with sharp ears and nose, and a bushy tail ; 
and in its mouth, all limp, and with head 
hanging, was one of the ducklings^ that had 
so lately been enjoying its morning meal. 

When Blackpad had given the alarm, old 
Mrs. Duck, with much splashing and quack- 
ing, had disappeared down the brook, while 
her family, with the exception of the unfor- 
tunate baby which had been feeding, had 
followed Blackpad's example and taken 
refuge under the banks. It was several 
minutes before she appeared, circling above 
the tree tops, and finally shot down into 
the brook near the old feeding ground. 
Then one by one the fugitives left their re- 
treats and huddled close to her in the mid- 
dle of the brook. They all understood 
now. They had had a visit from old Rey- 
nard and the family was smaller by one. 
A lesson had been learned, and during the 
remainder of the summer the daily meals 
were taken in the widest parts of the brook, 
well away from either shore. 

A change had been wrought, too. in the 
heart of Blackpad. He had proved himself 
a worthy sentinel. Henceforth he was 
trusted by his mother to give timely warn- 
ing of danger, and he was proud of the 
trust. There had been recent changes, too, 
on the outside. His downy coat was now 



covered with buff and brown feathers, and 
the wing feathers had lengthened, till he 
thought when he flapped what had formerly 
been 2 downy stubs, that the rest of the 
family should look on in awe. 

Those lessons in flying! How the whole 
family would leap from the water, at the 
beginning of some straight stretch of brook 
and after much flapping and quacking, 
alight at the other end. On one of these 
grand ' occasions, instead of stopping in 
their flight at the edge of the woods, they 
mounted higher and higher, above the tops 
of the trees, and after a flight of 5 or more 
miles, with their mother as leader, dropped 
into a large woodland lake. There were 
collected several other broods ; and there 
Blackpad made a number of acquaintances. 
During the time spent with them he showed 
himself as able a sentinel as he had been 
in his own meadow home. 

Then came the long looked for journey 
to the coast. What an event it was ! One 
evening at sunset the whole flock rose from 
the lake, and forming into a long V, flew 
South to the level stretch of flats that the 
tide had left plentifully supplied with food. 
Blackpad had held undisputed sway in his 
own home meadow and in the lake first 
visited, for there the flocks had consisted 
of young ducks and their mothers ; but 
when he reached the coast, he was deeply 
chagrined to find several old drakes who 
were not at all inclined to obey his orders, 
or even to trust the safety of the flock to 
his watchfulness. One old fellow par- 
ticularly seemed to have a decided hatred 
for Blackpad, and chased him from his 
presence whenever opportunity occurred. 
One night this old drake disappeared, no 
one knew where; although a banging 
sound on the other side of the island 
where they were feeding may have had 
something to do with it. The remaining 
drakes fought fiercely for the mastery, 
Blackpad winning. 

Ah ! Then his joy and pride knew no 
bounds. With what dignity he gave, each 
morning, his loud "quack, quack," rose from 
the flats, or salt ponds, and, followed by the 
whole band, led the long V-shaped squad 
far inland to the chain of lakes. How care- 
ful he was, when they arrived over a de- 
sirable drinking spot to lead them in a 
whistling circle 2 or 3 times around it be- 
fore they steadied their wings and shot 
down to enjoy its freshness. 

Blackpad never gave himself up to this 
enjoyment, for no sooner would the flock 
be settled, than he would swim round and 
round them, with raised head, steadily 
watching the shore, and keeping the care- 
less members of the flock from venturing 
too near its margin. 

On coming to their favorite lake one 
morning, Blackpad noticed an odd looking 



7% 



RECREATION. 



clump of brush on the shore, that he knew 
had not been there at the time of their last 
visit. He wisely led the flock down into 
the water farther than usual from the 
shore ; then took up his incessant beat 
around the band. 

Presently a yellow animal appeared from 
behind the brushwood, and in an instant 
every head in the flock was up. It was an 
animal that sent a thrill through the heart 
of Blackpad, for he remembered the inci- 
dent of his childhood, when the first break 
had occurred in their family; but this ani- 
$il 



objects rise behind the bush. With a loud 
warning, "quack, quack," he was out of the 
water, followed by the less curious part 
of the flock ; but the warning had been too 
late. Bang, bang — bang, bang — came 4 
heavy, thundering reports from the shore. 
Then the flying, frightened flock, glancing 
back, saw more than half the number whose 
curiosity had overpowered them, struggling 
from the spot or lying motionless on the 
water. 

This backward glance was enough ; and 
ever after, when Blackpad and his flock 




WlLMOT^OVWCEjta 



HUDDLED CLOSE TO HER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BROOK. 



mal was larger and acted differently. It 
played with sticks on the shore, disappeared 
behind the brush, then appeared, and re- 
sumed its gambols on the shore. 

Blackpad did not understand this, but 
he was too cautious to venture any nearer, 
and kept a steady watch on the flock, that 
no curious one should attempt to solve the 
mystery. In spite of his efforts a small 
detachment left the main flock and paddled 
slowly toward the mysterious spot. Nearer 
and nearer they approached. Then Black- 
pad, from his distant station, saw 2 dark 



were in the lakes, the appearance of a yel- 
low animal on the shore sent the whole 
flock in a swift whistling flight from the 
spot, for a more secluded retreat farther 
back in the wilderness. That is why the 
guides of the.-; legion, who take sportsmen 
with their yellow Chesapeake dogs to the 
lakes, when they see a goodly flock of 
black ducks settle down into the water, and 
a lonely figure begin a slow beat around 
the flock, will always say: 

"No, gentlemen, don't put out the dog. 
That flock will not toll." 



Mr. Waunta Noe— Did your husband die 
peacefully? 

Mrs. Berrymore— No ; he had 3 doctors. 
— Chicago Chronicle. 



CANOEING IN GEORGIAN BAY. 



G. H. HODGETTS. 



The countless islands of Georgian bay 
are destined to become one of the most 
popular summer resorts for both Canadian 
and American recreation seekers. They lie 
along the Eastern and Northern shores of 
the bay from which they derive their name, 
and which forms the Northeastern part of 
Lake Huron. Not many miles inland to the 
East, are the Muskoka lakes, famed for 
their beauty and picturesqueness.^ In the 
opinion of many who have camped in both 
localities, however, the Muskoka scenery 
can not compare with that amongst the is- 
lands to the West. 

Already many of the most desirable is- 
lands have been purchased from the Can- 
adian government by gentlemen from 
American .cities. Several beautiful club 
houses have been erected, and every year 
brings hither a larger number of our neigh- 
bors from across the line. I am a Cana- 
dian, but I am sure it is with pardonable 
pride that I extol the beauties of a part 
of my country of which the Americans 
themselves can not speak too highly. 

My last trip to the islands was made in 
the company of my 2 brothers, who live 
in St. Catherines, not 12 miles from Ni- 
agara Falls. We crossed Lake Ontario 
by boat to Toronto, thence by rail to Pen- 
etanguishene, a distance of 100 miles. A 
large and beautifully equipped passenger 
steamer connects with the train, and for 
several hours winds through countless 
channels and passages until one becomes 
almost bewildered by their intricacy. The 
islands are almost entirely of rock, but cov- 
ered in most cases with pine, spruce, cedar, 
birch, poplar, maple and oak, with an un- 
dergrowth of juniper and a variety of 
berry bushes. The trees grow in crevices 
in the rock which have become filled with 
soil, and it is surprising how thickly wood- 
ed some of these rocky islands are. Im- 
mense trees will often be seen apparently 
growing in the solid rock. There is also 
much heavy moss of different kinds and 
colors, which further adds to the beauty 
of the islands. 

We took our canoe and supplies from 
home. When the steamer reached a point 
about 50 miles from Penetang, we were 
landed on one of the islands. We immedi- 
ately camped for the night on the rocks. 
Our tent I had made specially for this trip. 
It is of 8 ounce duck, is round, 12 feet in 
diameter and 8 feet high, with a 2^ foot 
wall. This style of tent is, I think, the 
most suitable for a canoe trip, being light, 
capable of being packed in small compass, 



and requiring but one pole, an important 
consideration when you carry your whole 
outfit in a canoe. We slept on the ground, 
placing our blankets on a mattress of ce- 
dar boughs. Another year we intend hav- 
ing individual sleeping bags ; also a 
heavy canvas ground-cloth for the tent. 
We anchored the tent with small rocks, as 
there was, of course, no chance to drive 
pegs. 

Our provisions and cooking utensils were 
packed in 2 small boxes, and our bedding 
and clothing in canvas bags made for that 
purpose. We changed our clothes at Pen- 
etang and thus had not the trouble of lug- 
ging around civilized garments during our 
2 weeks' trip. We congratulated ourselves 
more than once that we had done so, as 
every additional article requires valuable 
space in the canoe, and makes extra work 
in loading and unloading. Our canoe is of 
basswood and was built to order in Peter- 
boro. It is simply perfection, as we have 
proved to our own satisfaction. Length, 
18 feet ; width, yj inches ; depth, 13 inches. 
It will hold our entire outfit conveniently, 
and leave plenty of room for 3 or even 4 
persons to paddle. We were not at all 
overloaded and paddled over 400 miles with 
all our stuff on board. 

We had with us a repeating shot gun, a 
.38-55 repeating rifle, a double barrelled 
shot gun, and a .22 caliber Stevens rifle. 
Game is plentiful among the islands and 
on the mainland. We went prepared for 
everything up to bear, which are often 
seen in the fall. Ducks were innumerable, 
but hard to get at. We could seldom ap- 
proach within gunshot of the numerous 
flocks which we frightened from their feed- 
ing grounds. By stopping in some of the 
rice beds for a day or 2, we might have 
shot dozens of wild fowl had we been so 
inclined, but we were on the go continually. 
For the same reason we got but few ruffed 
grouse, as we did not go into the bush for 
them. 

The fishing is, during the proper season, 
unsurpassed. Black bass, pike, muska- 
longe and trout are abundant. The bass 
fishing in Georgian bay is celebrated ; its 
rocky ledges seem the natural home of this 
most gamy fish. We had no difficulty in 
securing all the fish and ducks that we 
needed. We caught all our fish by trolling 
from the canoe. 

• If the weather was favorable we broke 
camp as soon as we finished breakfast. 
Everything was packed up and placed in 
the canoe, and in a few minutes we were 



79 



8o 



RECREATION. 



started on our day's paddle cf 25 or 30 
miles. A light lunch at noon saw us 
through until we camped in the evening 
on the first suitable spot that appeared. By 
the time tea had been prepared it would 
generally be past sunset. Then we would of 
necessity be compelled to eat by moonlight, 
assisted by our candle-lantern. By the 
way, that last mentioned article we con- 
sider a grand invention ; no coal oil to 
leak or soill, merely a few pounds of 
candles and a light globe lantern. 

I have camped in this same locality for 



some years past, but my brothers agree 
with me that until this fall we never knew 
what real camping was. For those who 
do not mind roughing it, and can put up 
'with and enjoy little inconveniences, a 
canoe trip through these islands is an ideal 
outing. The constant exercise, pure and 
invigorating air, dazzlingly clear water, 
ever changing scenery, and abundance of 
fish and game, combine to make One of the 
most enjoyable experiences that one could 
imagine. 




KING'S EX. 

EDWIN L. SABIN. 

The children are playing the old, old games 

Out there on the beckoning grass.. 
I hear the laughter, and mocking names 

Of rollicking lad and lass. 
And sudden an urchin halts his pace, 

The swoop of his comrades checks, 
And see ! He is granted the sought-for 
grace 

At the spell of his cry: "King's ex." 

"King's ex!" and never, tho' stout the fray, 

This charm in vain is tried ! 
And are we, who were children but yester- 
day, 

The right to such ruse denied? 
Look here, friends all, I would stop and 
rest, 

My respite let none dare vex ; 
Come quiet and truce, by naught oppressed, 

"King's ex!" busy, world, "King's ex!" 

"King's ex," to the hurrying to and fro ; 

The strenuous rush and rout; 
The city's pitiless ebb and flow, 

The struggles within, without. 
"King's ex !" I am weary of barter and 
throng ; 

To win or to lose, who recks? 
Oh, the wildwood ways, and the thrushes' 
song! 

"King's ex !" Father Time, "King's ex !" 



"Lizzie's come home from th' city with 
a lot o' newfangled cookin' idees," said Mr. 
Meddergrass. "Fixed up a new kind o' 
custard pie last night with what she called 
a mee-rang on top of it." 

"Mee-rang?" said Mr. Cartapple. "Now, 
what'n airth's thet like?" 

"Hanged if I know. Somepin' like sweet- 
ened soapsuds." — Judge. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY ALBERT HAANSTAO. 

SAILING BY MOONLIGHT. 

Winner of 51st Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual 
Photo Competition. 



"Please print instructions for smoking 
sausage," wrote the constant reader to the 
answers-for-the-anxious ed : tor. 

"Which — the long or the fine cut?" he 
wrote beneath the query. — Judge. 



A BALD FACED GRIZZLY AND THREE OTHERS. 



G. fl. MCCLELLAN U 



Iii July, i8§5, my partner, Billy, and I 
left the round-up on Brldger Creek, Wyo- 
ming, for a trip to Yellowstone park. At 
that time it was generally thought impos- 
sible to enter the park front the Southeast, 
or by following the Shoshone river. We had 
a good pack outfit of It horses, with the 
necessary camp duffle, 2 No, 6 Newhouse 
bear traps and Some beaVer traps. 

After many mishaps we arrived at the 
head of the North fork of Stinking Water, 
and Were glad to be in the open country 
above timber line, after our struggles with 
the canyon and its dense timber. Once 
clear of the timber, Billy stopped, looked 
the prospect over, and advised that we 
camp there, kill an elk, and jerk the meat 
for us during the journey through the park. 
I agreed, and pointing to- a scrubby spruce, 
suggested that we pitch camp under it. 

Billy rode ahead to reconnoitre, while I 
turned to drive forward the pack train. 
Chancing to look to my right, I saw an 
enormous silvertip with his fore paws on a 
log, looking us over and listening interest- 
edly to our conversation. He was not more 
than 30 yards off. I tried to warn Billy, 
whose rifle was in his hands'; my gun was 
in its sling, that I might be able to give 
my whole attention to the horses. Billy did 
not hear me. A second call in a louder 
tone alarmed the bear, which made for a 
deep gulch to the rear. 

I dismounted, snatched my repeater from 
its scabbard, ran to where I had last seen 
the bear, and waited. He came into view 
200 yards away, lumbering leisurely along. 
I fired twice, but without effect, as it 
proved. At the report of my rifle Billy 
came tearing back to know what was up. 
I replied, somewhat gruffly, that if he had 
kept his ears open, he might have had a 
good shot at short range. 

We unpacked hastily, prepared a quick 
snack, and then took the bear's trail to see 
if I had bled him. Convinced that I had 
missed, we gave it up and devoted ourselves 
to looking for elk signs. Those we found 
in plenty, and bear signs everywhere. 
Climbing to the summit, we found a per- 
pendicular wall cutting off all travel toward 
the East. Below us was a bunch of elk, 25 
or 30, but the wall was so high they seemed 
ao bigger than sheep. Taking a look around 
with our field glass, we were convinced we 
could not reach the band without a flying 
machine, or making a wide circuit. 

As we were about to turn away, Billy 
called my attention to an object to the 
right of the elk, which proved to be a bear 
coming out of the timber. He went to a 



miry place, dug a hole and wallowed as" a 
hog does on a hot day. We rolled a boul= 
der over the Wall. Bruin raised oil his 
haunches to listen, then resumed his mud 
bath. The elk paid tip attention, 

Returning to the timber, we struck an 
old, Well defined game trail, which we ioU 
lowed toward a Wooded point. On the way 
I discovered a white faced bean We had 
heard a good deal about bald faced bears 
and resolved to kill this one. We man- 
aged to get a bunch of scrubby pines be^ 
tween him and us, and sneaked up closer. 
Then we found there were 2 bears and that 
they were on the opposite side of a deep 
gulch. Flat down we lay and crawled to 
a line behind a second bunch of pines, 
where we took a fresh peep. 

Holy Moses ! There were 4 of them ! 
Another bunch or 2 of pines and there 
might be a score ! 

They were feeding on roots, which they 
were busily digging. One more sneak and 
Baldy would be ours. Watching when 
heads were all down; we stole to a last 
pine bunch. There, Billy suggested, we 
were between them and the shelter they 
would seek when we began shooting. I 
said I couldn't help it ; I wanted Baldy's 
dress suit, even if we had to climb a tree. 

Old Baldy was highest up the bank, and 
just then turned broadside on. I told Billy 
I would kill Baldy and he could then take 
another as they started out. Taking a 
careful bead on the white faced old fellow, 
just back of the shoulder, I pressed the 
trigger. Dirt flew up beyond him, and at 
first I thought I had missed, but in a mo- 
ment I saw him rolling down hill. As I 
rose to my knees Billy shouted, "Look "out! 
Here they come !" 

Sure enough ! And 5 of them at that ! 
Within 15 yards of us they came, tearing 
for the timber, and whether we or they 
were most scared I can not tell. I know 
we should have stopped the whole bunch, 
and we got only 3 — Baldy and a pair of 
yearlings. 

My first shot, a 45-90 bullet, had gone 
through Baldy's heart, but it did not stop 
him under 200 yards. We examined his 
bald face with interest, and I am convinced 
he was only a silvertip so old as to be 
turning gray. Around the ears and ex- 
tending below the eyes was a gray streak 
3 inches wide. There was another band 
of gray hair reaching more than half way 
round the neck on the upper side. I should 
like to hear through Recreation from oth- 
ers who have had to do with bald faced 
bears. 



81 




THE MJGHTY BEAR HUNTER £AME DOWN THE TRAIL AT BREAK NECK SPEED. 

82 



HOW SOME TENDERFEET HUNT BEAR. 



FRANK SEAMAN. 



Some years ago a certain Eastern man 
went to a well known summer resort in 
the mountains for the avowed purpose of 
hunting bear. He put up at the best hotel, 
employed a guide, engaged saddle horses 
and spent several days in preparation for 
the trip, meantime telling the other guests 
at the house what a mighty hunter he was, 
how many wild animals he had slain, how 
anxious he was to meet a big grizzly and 
how he would annihilate him when he did 
meet him. 

At intervals, the hunter would bring 
down a gun, a revolver, a knife, a belt of 
cartridges or some other item of his outfit, 
show it to the loiterers, explain to them 
how he was going to use it when he met 
the bear, and entertain them with stories 
of his hunting exploits, in other regions. 

Finally, the morning of the eventful day 
dawned. The mighty hunter appeared 
early on the veranda, clad in hunting togs 
and armed to the teeth. In due time his 
guide came, riding one horse and lead- 
ing another. The hunter mounted and pro- 
ceeded to pose for some of the kodakers on 
the balcony. He was a fearful and won- 
derful sight. He was a short, stout man, 
and when in the saddle looked nearly as 
big one way as the other. He wore a suit 
of brand new, stiff brown canvas, includ- 
ing a fore and aft cap, from beneath which 
his bushy gray hair protruded slightly. He 
had one rifle in a holster under his right 
leg, and another slung over his back by a 
strap. He wore a belt outside his short 
hunting coat, some 4 inches wide and filled 
from end to end with long cartridges. On 
this belt hung 2 revolvers and a big knife. 
He wore heavy leather hunting boots that 
came above his knees, and that were laced 
in front and on the sides. On these he 
wore big spurs, and in his hand he carried 
a saucy looking quirt. Finally, after hav- 
ing displayed himself to the gaze of the 
admiring crowd for what he deemed a suf- 
ficient length of time, he and his guide rode 
away up a mountain trail. 

They had gone 3 or 4 miles when the 
guide saw in the trail the track of a large 
grizzly. Without mentioning the fact to 
the hunter, he dropped out and said to his 
patron, 

"You'd better ride ahead now. We are 
in the bear country and you are likely to 
get a shot anywhere along here." 

The hunter touched his cayuse with the 
spur and moved forward. The guide said 
he would follow at a little distance, so that 
the hunter might have all the better oppor- 
tunity to find game. 



The guide was riding leisurely along, 
some 50 yards behind his modern Don 
Quixote, when all at once he heard a yell 
and the clatter of hoofs. He guessed the 
cause and turned out of the trail. 

There was a mighty crashing of brush 
and rattling of rocks, a succession of yells 
which sounded like "Police ! Help ! Mur- 
der !" and various other startling ejacula- 
tions. In an instant the mighty bear hunt- 
er came down the trail at breakneck speed, 
with his eyes fairly sticking out. He 
passed the guide, apparently without see- 
ing him, and went out of sight in a flash, 
the horse hitting only the high places. 

The guide pursued the fleeing appari- 
tion and after riding a mile or 2 overtook 
his employer. The former had by that 
time somewhat recovered from the stam- 
pede, had slowed down to a walk and was 
looking back. When the guide overtook 
him and asked what was the trouble, a 
storm of curses and imprecations broke 
fcrth. 

"You blankety blank idiot ! You imp of 
Satan ! You vile conspirator ! You infer- 
nal jailbird ! What do you mean by try- 
ing to get me killed? You ought to be 
shot for taking a man into such a death 
trap as that !" 

The guide remonstrated with the hunter 
and asked him to explain. 

"Why, you blithering idiot, didn't you 
see him?" 

"See what?" 

"The bear." 

"No. Where was any bear?" 

"Why, up there. He rose up in the trail 
not 30 feet from me, and I'd take my oath 
he was 12 feet high, 4 feet wide and you 
are liable to get some man killed by tak- 
ing him into such a country as that, and I 
shall report you to the police as soon as 
we get to the hotel." 

Then the hunter put spurs to his horse 
again and the next the guide saw of him 
was when he called at the hotel to ask for 
his pay. 

The Nimrod had cooled off by that time 
and was busy packing his guns, ammuni- 
tion and hunting togs into his trunks. He 
said he had found all the bear he wanted, 
and took the next train for the East. 

A certain Englishman came to America, 
went West and got off the train at Red 
Dog. He told the people he had come out 
to hunt bear, especially grizzlies. He 
had killed several other kinds of big game, 
but had never killed a bear and that was 
what he aspired to do now. Several loung- 



s 4 



RECREATION. 



ers offered their services as guides, but he 
said he did not want a guide. He was 
competent to take care of himself, find his 
own game and kill it. The people sized 
him up as a rank tenderfoot, and, winking 
at one another, several of them advised him 
how to proceed. Two or 3 of the North- 
west mounted police were present and re- 
garded the stranger rather more seriously 
than the cow punchers did. They feared 
he might get lost if he went into the woods 
and perhaps starve to death. The sergeant 
told one of the policemen to notice_ which 
way the man went, follow him at a distance, 
and after a few hours to bring him back to 
the station. 

The cowboys told the Englishman to take 
the main road down the valley, and that 
after getting out of town a mile or so he 
would stand a good show of finding a bear 
anywhere. After dinner, the Englishman 
shouldered his fancy double barrel express 
rifle, hooked oil his cartridge belt, in which 
he carried a large hunting knife, and 
walked off down the road. 

The town loafers were having all sorts 
of fun among themselves as to what the 
result would be. There were ranches all 
along the road and the hunter could hardly 
get out of sight of a house anywhere with- 
in 20 miles. Bets were made as to how 
long it would take him to get tired of hunt- 
ing bear and return to the village. 

Night came on and all eyes were turned 
down the road, watching for a dusty trav- 
eler; but none appeared, and at 9 or 10 
o'clock the men scattered to their bunks. 
The next morning the sergeant started 2 
of the police officers to hunt the English- 
man. Several of the loiterers mounted 
their horses and accompanied the officers. 
They had gone but 4 or 5 miles down the 
valley when they saw smoke rising from 
among the trees, a hundred yards from the 
road. They turned out and _ found the 
Englishman complacently leaning against 
a tree, in front of his fire, eating some 
crackers and cheese he had carried with 
him, and 10 feet away lay one of the big- 
gest grizzlies that had been killed in that 
country in years. The Englishman had 
simply stumbled into a piece of luck. He 
had found a fresh track of a bear crossing 
the road, had followed it so quietly that he 
came on the bear before it knew there was 
any harm in sight, and had bowled the old 
chap over with 2 well directed shots. The 
laugh was on the men who had laughed at 
the tenderfoot. 

Another Englishman went to Bozeman 
some years ago and made known to the 
local gun dealer his desire to go on a bear 
hunt. A guide, cook and packer were em- 
ployed, an outfit of horses, food, tents, etc., 
was pulled together, and the next morning 



the party strung out for the mountains. 
This Bozeman crowd had also sized up 
their patron as a tenderfoot and had con- 
gratulated themselves on having an easy 
snap in sight. They had gone but a short 
distance into the foothills when they found 
where a big bear had crossed the trail. 
The track was several days old, but they 
did not say so to the Englishman. They 
told him it was fresh, and that a bear near- 
ly always returned on his trail within a 
few hours. 

"Now," said they, "if you will just sit 
down here and keep quiet, you are sure to 
get a shot before night, or if the bear does 
not come back to-day he will to-morrow or 
the next day. We will go up the next 
creek a mile from here, make camp, and 
have dinner ready for you about dusk." 

The Englishman was obedient and con- 
fiding, so he did as he was told. He sat 
there patiently all the afternoon, looking up 
the side of the hill and waiting for the bear 
to come doubling back on his trail. The 
afternoon wore away, the sun sank behind 
the mountain, darkness began to gather, 
and when it got too dark to see to shoot 
the Englishman shouldered his gun and hit 
the trail for camp. On arrival there the 
boys expressed their sympathy with him 
and said, 

"You are sure to get a shot to-morrow or 
the next day, if you stick to it." 

The camp was astir before daylight and 
by the time it was light enough to see the 
trail the Englishman was at his post again. 

He stayed till near sundown, when he 
showed up at camp and asked the boys to 
come down with him and help skin the 
bear. At first they thought "he was joking, 
but when he assured them he was in dead 
earnest, they were speechless with surprise. 
They could scarcely believe he was in his 
right mind. However, they went with him 
and when they arrived at the place where 
they had stationed him, they found an im- 
mense grizzly with 3 or 4 bullet holes 
through him. Again the laugh was on the 
Smart Alecks. 

A writer who lives in Washington, 
D. C, was traveling in the Canadian 
Rockies in search of adventures and other 
things, on which to write a book. He found 
one thing that he probably did not record 
in his book. One day while in camp at the 
junction of Bear creek and the Saskatche- 
wan river he and 2 of his men went out 
to look for something to write about, and 
found a big white animal, of which they 
got a fleeting glimpse as it moved through 
the bushes. One man fired at the animal 
and wounded it. The bookish man asked 
them what it was and they said it was a 
grizzly, whereupon Litterateur shinned up 
a tree. The men followed the wounded 



HOW SOME TENDERFEET HUNT BEAR. 



85 



grizzly, leaving the author high and dry. 
He staid up the tree nearly an hour. Then 
he got tired of his perch, came down off 
it and ran like a scared cat to camp, where 
he arrived out of breath. Between gasps 
he told the man who had been left in charge, 
what had happened. When he got cooled 
down a little, he said he was afraid the 
bear would turn on the boys and kill them. 

"If they don't come back soon, we must 
go down that way and holler for them." 

Finally the hunters returned and report- 
ed that they had killed the bear and hung 
it up. The old packer who had staid in 
camp, said it could not have been a big 
grizzly or they could not have hung it up. 

"Yes," they said, "it is an immense one." 
one." 

"All right, we will go out and skin him," 
said the packer. 

They had some trouble in coaxing the 
literary man to go with them. He said he 
was afraid the bear might come to life by 
the time they got to him. However, the 
men prevailed on the writer to accompany 
them. When they got in sight of the game 
the old packer said to the literary man, 

"Well, that's the first grizzly I ever saw 
that had horns." 

"By gum," said the writer, "it has horns, 
hasn't it?" And as they got nearer to the 
animal they found it was a big, white goat. 

For weeks after that the literary hunter 
did not like to talk about grizzlies. 

Two Chicago men went out West on the 
same errand as the other fellows. They 
were both anxious to kill bear, and though 
they had previously hunted nothing larger 
than deer, and no farther West than Mich- 
igan, they felt sure they were equal to any 
grizzly that ever came down the pike. 
They employed 3 guides and plenty of 
horses. They outfitted liberally and went 
high up among the snow slides where they 
were told bear were numerous. The 
guides proved a scurvy lot and after 2 days 
of inefficient, weak efforts at finding game, 
told the tourists they did not believe there 
were any bears in the country at that time. 
They advised an early return to the rail- 



road and a trip in another direction. The 
tenderfeet agreed to this suggestion and the 
next morning camp was broken. 

Meantime rain set in and the conditions 
rendered it likely that snow would soon 
follow. The guides led the outfit up the 
side of a mountain, near timber line, where 
they advised the hunters to wait until they 
(the guides) could look up a short cut to 
the railway station. The hunters halted 
and the guides lit out. They found the 
short cut easily enough and rode directly 
into town, some 15 miles away. The pack- 
er undertook to follow with the pack train, 
but did not find the trail the guides had 
taken. He then headed for another trail 
he knew of, but a much longer one. By 
that road it took him 2 days to reach the 
railway. 

The poor, shivering tenderfeet were left 
on the mountain with only their saddle 
blankets and the bit of lunch they were 
carrying in their pockets. They spent a 
miserable night at timber line, in a cold 
rain, and had great difficulty in keeping 
their fire and themselves alive. Late in the 
evening the owner of the horses found the 
3 guides in a saloon, drinking beer and 
having a high old time. He rounded them 
up, threatened to kill them, and on learn- 
ing where they had left the hunters, em- 
ployed another man and started him early 
the next morning to rescue the hunters. 

The new guide found the poor fellows 
shivering around a small fire. Though 
they had been away from their guides less 
than 24 hours, they had already killed one 
of their saddle horses and one of the men 
sat by the fire toasting a piece of quiver- 
ing horse flesh on a forked stick. One of 
the hunters had lost a good shot gun, and 
they had hung up the saddle belonging to 
the dead horse, and had entirely forgotten 
where it was. All 3 of the men hunted for 
it but could not find it, and finally aban- 
doned it. Both saddle and shot gun are 
somewhere among the rocks in that, vicin- 
ity, and the hunters say any man who will 
find them may have them. The men are 
sore on bear hunting and say they do not 
care to kill any more. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY G. C. WARNER. 

HAWK EGGS. 
Winner of 46th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



~~~ . « i .»"■■■■ ! ■ ■ ■ <- ' i - i- ■ > « ! ' . ■ " « » *• « ' ■ '» «^~yH»iii')i*i> 



" » *»■ /" 



. .^^....^x.. i m . . .m. ,| W W 




HE JOINED ANOTHER FLOCK OF 50 OR MORE. 

Puzzle: Find the Newcomer. 
86 



A PRAIRIE LIFE. 



HATTIE WASHBURN. 



The hero of my story first saw the light 
beneath a thick clump of grass on the 
prairies. His mother, being an old and ex- 
perienced prairie hen, led him, with 9 other 
beautiful little balls of brown and yellow 
down, from the nest when they were only 
a few hours old. It was a balmy day in 
May, and many an unwary insect, basking 
in the genial sunlight, found its way from 
the bill of the mother down the throats of 
the young. 

A week passed, and in spite of the par- 
ent's loving care the number of the brood 
was reduced to 7. Two strayed in the rank 
grass and became the prey of a foraging 
skunk, while a third was borne away in 
the talons of a hawk. The remaining fledg- 
lings, their pretty down having given place 
to a rough coat of feathers, were about to 
try their wings. This they did suddenly 
one day, being startled by a pedestrian, and 
such was the whirring of . their wings that 
the intruder was in turn much startled. 

Their maiden flight was short, and drop- 
ping into the long, thick grass they lay 
securely hidden, while the hen ran on, 
dragging an apparently broken wing and 
uttering cackles of maternal concern. 

Having learned this new mode of loco- 
motion they made longer flights day by day 
and relieved the mother of her anxiety as 
to their safety and their food supply. They 
fed largely on grasshoppers and other in- 
sects, with the buds and leaves of various 
plants, until the grain ripened, when they 
made some inroads on the farmer's crop. 

Thus passed their childhood, with the 
happy summer, and the grain was in the 
shock when the cool air of early morning 
echoed and re-echoed with the report of 
hunters' guns and dogs ranged throughout 
the fields. The time during which the game 
is protected by law had expired but the 
grouse did not realize this. They only 
knew that from field to field a fusillade of 
death and terror ran. 

The family of my hero were among the 
first to be disturbed. Two were killed on 
the first rise. The remaining members were 
frightened from their retreats by the dog 
and all but 2 found their way into the 
sportsman's bag. One of these carried a 
broken wing and a maimed breast to a tuft 
of coarse grass, there to suffer in solitude 
until nightfall. Then a wandering coyote 
succeeded where the dog had failed, and 
carried the little victim to his den. The 
chick to which this story particularly re- 
lates found concealment in a clump of wild 
sunflowers at the margin of the field. 



Being the last of his family, and soon 
growing weary of being a lone wanderer, 
he joined another flock of 50 or more. 
There, though ignorant of the relationship, 
he first met his father, who, after the man- 
ner of pinnated grouse, had shirked all pa- 
ternal duties and passed the summer with 
a few other cocks in feasting and idleness. 
Others joined the pack from time to time 
and in spite of the ardor of the hunters, 
they numbered, by the first snowfall, more 
than 100. 

Thus my hero passed the winter, a mem- 
ber of a large social circle, who, undisturbed, 
gathered the scattered grain in the fields, ate 
rose fruit and weed seeds, and when these 
were covered by great drifts of snow, even 
visited the farmers' stacks. When the mat- 
ing season arrived he chose a young female 
whose shapely body was beautifully barred 
with white, buff and brown, and on either 
side of whose graceful neck were dainty 
pinnates ; but as she had won the admira- 
tion of another cock, many and long were 
the contests which ensued. With many 
other like combatants he met his rival on 
the old booming place which their ances- 
tors had trodden smooth each season for 
more than 20 years. His lady looked on 
and joined the other females in their ex- 
cited cacklings. The intrepid suitor ele- 
vated his long pinnates, inflated the orange 
colored sacs on the sides of his neck and 
uttering a melodious boom, like the low 
notes of a powerful organ, rushed on his 
rival. That less daring lover lacked the 
courage to meet the onset, and bounded into 
the air, allowing the more valorous combat- 
ant to pass under him. These sham battles 
were repeated again and again, and their 
booming pleasantly broke the early morn- 
ing stillness and the hush of evening. At 
last, driven to desperation, his rival met 
him in close combat, and oblivious of all 
else they fought long and desperately until 
the heads and necks of each were covered 
with wounds and their beautifully barred 
plumage was stained crimson. At last our 
hero triumphantly claimed his prize. 

His domestic joys were destined to be of 
short duration. One day when flying rapid- 
ly before a gale that swept the prairie, 
piling the newly cultivated soil in drifts 
along the grass-grown margin of the fields 
and filling the air with dust until the noon- 
day sun was pale, he came in contact with 
a telegraph wire and died before reaching 
the ground, many rods beyond, with a deep- 
ly wounded breast and head and one wing 
entirely severed from his body. 



87 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY S. G. JAMESON. 



THE ANGLER 
Winner of 49th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



■£2kA 




NEST AND EGGS OF RUFFED GROUSE. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY H. H. PRASE*. 



Winner of 53rd Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 

88 



A CRUISE THAT BEGAN. 



E. D. H. 



When we planned the cruise, it was our 
intention to spend a week visiting the va- 
rious old fashioned villages on the North 
shore of Long Island from Glen Cove to 
Port Jefferson. A cruise of this character 
is generally attended with little danger and 
great pleasure. The Sound is compara- 
tively narrow, and the many deep land 
locked inlets afford perfect security from 
the storms that occasionally sweep in from 
the Atlantic. There were the usual 3 in 
our party. Rob acted as captain, while I 
performed the miscellaneous duties of cook 
and crew. For goodfellowship we invited 
Tom, a landsman. 

Our vessel was the Stingaree, a sloop 
that had not gained an enviable reputation 
for beauty. She had been a lobster smack 
in her day, and her day was passed. Still, 
she was not utterly devoid of good quali- 
ties, being extremely staunch and sea- 
worthy. She was of clinker build, 22 feet 
over all, 8 feet beam and 26 inches draught, 
and carried in addition to her dingy, weath- 
er beaten working rig, a club and a jib 
topsail, brand new and of amateur make. 
A square summer cabin with roof of light 
pine and canvas, constructed over the for- 
ward end of the spacious cockpit, intensi- 
fied her ugliness. 

We certainly did not look yachty. We 
had tacked a matting on the floor. On one 
side of the centerboard trunk we had piled 
cushions, blankets and valises ; on the 
other, cooking utensils and provisions. An 
oil stove, 2 lanterns, a mirror, and an alarm 
clock completed our furnishings. 

One beautiful morning in the latter part 
of August, 1893, we slipped our moorings 
in the upper harbor of Stamford, and with 
a light, fitful, Easterly wind abeam, 
dropped lazily down the narrow channel 
into the broad bay. As we drifted out 
from under the windward shore, the fresh- 
ening breeze aroused us to activity. Club 
and jib topsails were hoisted and sheets 
made taut. The broad track astern, flecked 
with foam, told how fast we were travel- 
ing. Merrily we bowled along toward the 
open Sound, leaving far behind Pine island 
with its 3 lonely, skeleton-like trees, and 
the white beaches dotted with summer cot- 
tages. 

The day was perfect. The sky was a 
pale blue ; the waters, glistening and spark- 
ling in the sunlight, reflected the blueness 
above, but added a deeper sapphire. A 
few scuds of leaden hue hung motionless 
on the Eastern horizon. 



89 



Leaving the Light, we let off sheet and, 
with the wind on our quarter, headed 
Southwest for the point, faintly seen 
through the enshrouding haze, marking the 
entrance to Hempstead bay. We were then 
fairly on our cruise, perfectly happy and 
contented. We were at our respective po- 
sitions : Rob at the helm, I at the sheets, 
and Tom sprawled out on the cabin roof, 
deeply interested in yellow covered litera- 
ture. An ebb tide was running strong, and 
bucking against the wind, kicked up a little 
sea. The Stingaree was pitching and roll- 
ing considerably. Suddenly Tom sat bolt 
upright. 

"Say, boys !" he exclaimed, laying down 
his pipe and book ; "I don't feel well." 

"Tobacco," I suggested. 

"Couldn't hurt a hardened subject like 
me," he answered with a sickly smile. 

He certainly did look ill. An ashen gray 
was creeping over his face. In a moment 
misery and despair had taken the nlace of 
peace and contentment. It was not many 
minutes before he was hanging over the lee 
rail, gazing contemplatively into the green 
depths. Rob and I did what we could for 
h:m. The only thing that seemed to give 
him relief was a lemon, the old fashioned 
: *medy for seasickness. We were obliged, 
h^</ever, to fasten an end of the main sheet 
about his waist to prevent him from pitch- 
ing headlong overboard when the boat 
heeled. 

In a little over 2 hours the Stingaree 
left the turbulent waters of the Sound, 
poked her nose around the outer point, and 
headed up Hempstead bay. The wind, com- 
ing down over the bluffs, blew in squalls. 
At times it struck heavily and we were 
finally obliged to take in our topsails. The 
weather was beginning to look decidedly 
owlish. The scuds in the East, noticed at 
our departure, had grown and expanded 
until the sun was completely obscured. A 
storm was brewing; of that we were cer- 
tain, but we felt secure, for we were put- 
ting into one of the safest harbors on the 
coast. 

We let go our anchor just inside the 
breakwater. Sails were lowered and every- 
thing was put shipshape ; but Tom, who 
was slowly coming to himself once 
more, could stand the suspense no 
longer. While we were at work tidying 
up he crawled into the dinghy and rowed 
ashore. We said nothing for fear we 
might hurt his feelings. It was past mid- 
day and we were ravenously hungry. The 



90 



RECREATION. 



pot of coffee and chicken sandwiches which 
I had prepared were delicious. Neverthe- 
less, we missed Tom, for he is a good fel- 
low except in a heavy sea. 

The afternoon we read, smoked and 
loafed, for we were prisoners aboard our 
boat, since the dinghy, our only means of 
getting ashore, was tied up at the wharf. 
Tom did not arrive until late, and had 
evidently been seeing the town. 

When the flagship of the small fleet of 
yachts in the bay fired the sunset gun, we, 
too, hauled down our pennant and hung 
out our light. Then we made preparations 
for the storm. We inspected the anchor 
and cable, made fast all halyards, and 
stowed away odds and ends. We next 
slung our tarpaulin over the boom, thus 
making a tent-like covering for the after 
cockpit. Into this cozy little den we 
crawled, lighted the lantern, and settled 
ourselves among the cushions and blank- 
ets. Out came pipes and tobacco. As we 
lay there dreamily smoking and talking, 
sweet strains of music and the gay laugh- 
ter of dancers drifted in from the Casino 
up the harbor ; wavelets clicked mer- 
rily against the sides of the boat, and soon 
drops of rain pattered gently on the roof 
above. Our cup of happiness was full 
to overflowing. It was then, in our 
ecstasy, tha.t we voted cruising a complete 
success. 

"Douse the glim !" called out Tom. "I 
am going to bunk." 

Before Rob and I could remonstrate, he 
had blown out the light, leaving us in total 
darkness. He was sorry a moment later, 
to judge from the remarks he made as we 
stumbled over him on our way out to take 
a peep at the weather before we should 
turn in. 

The night was of inky blackness. The 
wind had shifted to Southeast, and was 
blowing steadily at 10 knots. There was an 
ominous singing in the rigging, and the 
halyards were whipping angrily back and 
forth. 

"I don't fancy this music aloft." said the 
captain. "If I am not much mistaken, we 
are going to have a disagreeable night. 

The lights of vessels that had made shel- 
ter after nightfall were brightly glimmer- 
ing all about us. There was one only a 
few rods to windward. 

"I wish those fellows had chosen a dif- 
ferent anchoring ground," the captain re- 
marked, referring to the vessel ahead. 

"It would go hard with us if she 
should drag," I added. 

I did not fall asleep so quickly as the 
others. The stimulating effects of strong 
coffee and tobacco, together with worry 
over the coming storm, kept my brain ac- 
tive. Several times I arose and peered out. 
Each time I noticed a change for the worse. 



The wind was increasing and it was still 
raining. After several hours of wakeful- 
ness I must have fallen into a doze, for I 
was suddenly startled by a violent lurch 
of the boat. I sprang up, lit a match and 
looked at the clock. The light awoke the 
captain. It was half-past one. 

The Stingaree was rolling and tossing 
fearfully. Every once in a while there 
was a tremendous tug at the anchor. 
The boat would shiver as if struck 
by a blow. Then she would lie quiet a 
second and, recovering, would again leap 
to the nexf^wave. This was repeated over 
and over as the billows struck and 
passed under. The rain was coming down 
in torrents. The cabin roof had begun to 
leak. A small rivulet was sportively chas- 
ing its way down the chin of our slumber- 
ing comrade. 

"Poor fellow," remarked Rob. "He has 
had a hard time of it to-day, and must be 
tired if he can sleep amid such surround- 
ings." 

Suddenly, breaking in through the tu- 
mult of the elements, came a faint cry. 

"Boat, ahoy!" 

We scrambled out on deck. We were 
sorry a moment later that we did not have 
on our bathing suits. The spray was com- 
ing over the bow in sheets. Clinging to 
the boom, we made our way forward over 
the cabin roof, while the boat was tossing 
about like an egg-shell. Reaching the mast, 
we seized the halyards and held on for 
dear life. We could barely discern the 
dim outlines of a small vessel. Our sur- 
misings in the early part of the evening 
had come true. She was dragging and 
drifting fast. If she struck us, it meant 
disaster. We would either go to the bot- 
tom on the spot or be dashed to pieces on 
the breakwater astern. 

"Hello! What's the trouble?" 

There was Tom poking his head out of 
the tarpaulin. During the excitement of 
the moment we had forgotten him. His 
position was exceedingly dangerous if the 
boat should go down. 

"For heaven's sake, get out of there and 
come on deck," thundered the captain. 

Tom crawled out and made his way gin- 
gerly toward us. It was a ticklish moment 
for us all. The roar of the storm, the 
swash of the waves, the downpouring of 
the rain, and the drifting vessel, drawing 
nigh all too speedily, were sufficient to 
cause the stoutest heart to quail. 

The captain stood with the cable in his 
hand, after taking several turns around the 
mast, ready to let it run quickly out when 
the collision occurred, and thus lessen the 
force of the shock. The stranger was hold- 
ing directly for us. There seemed no 
chance of escape. We waited in breathless 



A CRUISE THAT BEGAN. 



91 



suspense. Then something happened. A 
gust of wind struck us and whirled us to 
port, the captain at the same time slacken- 
ing the cable. We were saved. The stran- 
ger passed across our bows to starboard 
with scarcely a foot to spare. 

"Hey, you ! Catch this line." 

We could faintly see a man on the ves- 
sel, with a coil of rope in his hand. As he 
spoke he gave it a toss and it fell across 
our deck. I sprang quickly forward and 
took a few turns with it around the mast, 
just above our own cable, which the cap- 
tain was now making fast. It was a dan- 
gerous thing to do, but danger was not 
thought of in the excitement of the mo- 
ment. Could our anchor hold both vessels? 
That was the question that stared us in the 
face. As the line grew taut I gradually 
loosened my end in order to break the 
force of the final tremendous strain which 
would probably have snapped the stran- 
ger's line or own cable. At last the ves- 
sel was riding free and swinging to her 
line. Our anchor was still holding firmly. 
We were compelled, however, to change 
the line from the mast to a cleat in the 
stern, since it was playing havoc with our 
tarpaulin, as it swung back and forth. 

"This is glorious," said the sport, as we 
crawled back into the cabin, shivering with 
cold and excitement. We looked at him 
with disdain. He was to be excused, 
though ; he was not a sailor. 

But danger was not yet over. Suddenly 
there came a fearful lurch, and a mighty 
strain at the anchor. For a second there 
was no response. 

"Boys, she's gone ! The cable's parted," 
I cried, and sprang wildly toward the open- 
ing. But I was thrown headlong off my 
feet. Another wave had struck, and the 
cable pulled taut. We were still safe. 

I fumbled round, lighted the lintern and 
looked at the clock. It was just 3. The 
dim, yellow light fell on 3 of the most mis- 
erable and abject creatures imaginable. 
We sat there, glum and silent, drenched 
to the skin, with our hands clasped about 
our knees. Two long, weary hours before 
us till dawn. How slowly the minutes 
dragged ; but soon our anxiety was re- 
moved when we discovered that the temp- 
est was abating. The rain ceased to fall, 
and wind and sea were subsiding. Tom 
started a song. Rob and I tried to join in 
the chorus ; but it was a dismal failure ; 
our spirits were too dampened. 

At 5, faint streaks of light were visible 
through the trees crowning the bluffs to 
the Eastward. The rising sun soon gave 
promise of a fair day. The wind had en- 
tirely died out and the water presented so 
peaceful and unruffled an appearance that 
one could scarcely believe it capable of the 



fury into which it had lashed itself only a 
few hours before. 

The first thing we did when we went on 
deck was to take a look at our visitor of 
the night. She proved to be an aristo- 
cratic looking Newport cat ; she was ap- 
parently uninjured and was riding quietly 
at her own anchor once more. As yet 
there were no signs of life aboard. Other 
vessels in the harbor had not been so for- 
tunate, as the wrecks of several on the 
breakwater testified. Happily there had 
been no lives lost, although there were 
many narrow escapes. 

As quickly as possible we hauled out on 
deck our household goods for drying. In 
a moment we had converted the Stingaree 
into a monstrous clothes-horse. Blankets 
and clothing of all kinds floated from mast- 
head, shroud, halyard and topping lift. The 
cook had a great deal of trouble preparing 
breakfast that morning with damp matches 
and smoking oil wicks. However, our pa- 
tience was rewarded when we sat down to 
our simple but appetizing meal of corn- 
beef hash, boiled eggs and fragrant coffee. 
While we were eating, our friends from 
the catboat rowed alongside and almost 
swamped us by expressions of gratitude 
for our service during the night. 

The bright sun and the brisk Northwest 
wind dried all our clothing beautifully by 
afternoon. When we had stowed everything 
away and put the boat shipshape once 
more, we called Tom and held a coun- 
cil to decide whether we should con- 
tinue the cruise. To our astonishment, 
Tom sprung on us the startling informa- 
tion that it was necessary he should be 
home that very evening. He had an im- 
portant engagement to fill which he had 
forgotten until that moment. In fact, he 
must take the train for New York right 
away. Rob and I thought it strange 
this had not occurred to him before. Still, 
we did not blame him. He had been 
through experiences that were trying to a 
landsman. Well, this turn of affairs set- 
tled the question. We did not care to con- 
tinue the cruise alone. Then, again, our 
provisions were ruined, and everything 
else was in bad condition. So we took 
Tom ashore and bade him a fond fare- 
well. Not many minutes afterward our 
sails were hoisted, and we were soon cut- 
ting the waters of the Sound at a lively 
clip, with a puffy Nor'wester abeam. 
By the time we reached Stamford Light 
the wind dropped with the setting sun, and 
it was with difficulty that we beat up the 
harbor. We arrived home late in the even- 
ing. Our friends were relieved, since they 
were beginning to feel anxiety for our 
safety. The storm had been a severe one 
along the coast from Florida to Maine, 
and many vessels were lost. 



THE RUSTIC'S COMPLAINT. 



H. P. VAN ARSDALE. 



I've been a-readin' all about these here new 

fangled riggin's 
Like that there city chap has got that's 

down to Farmer Higgins' ; 
Of shiny spoons an' feathered hooks, an' all 

such useless things, 
An' butterflies they make themselves with 

bright an' gaudy wings. 
Now, what they want of all such things I'm 

sure I can't quite see; 
Just common butterflies an' hooks is good 

enough fer me. 
All I want is a runnin' stream, a cool an' 

shady nook, 
A willow pole, a bobber, an' a common line 

an' hook. 



They've got these poles you take apart, all 

painted up so fine, 
An' little wheels stuck on the end so they 

can wind the line. 
These wheels has got a handle on, I think 

they call 'em reels ; 
An' then to put the fish in, they've got 

baskets they call creels. 
Now, what they want of creels I swan I 

don't exactly know ; 
Why, half the fun is stringin' 'em an' 

watchin' the string grow ! 
But they can have their fancy things ; all I 

want is the brook, 
A willow pole, a bobber, an' a common line 

an' hook. 



I even hear that they have got printed di- 
rection books, 
That tells 'em just what bait to use, an' 

where to find the nooks ! 
Why, I can go down to the crick 'most any 

sunny day, 
An' catch all of the speckled trout that I 

can tote away; 
While that there city feller with his tackle 

new an' bright, 
Will walk beside me on the bank an' never 

git a bite. 
So he can have his tackle bright an' his 

direction book ; 
All I want is a willow pole, a bobber, line 

and hook. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. F. COWGILL. 



STEPPING HIGH. 

Winner of 30th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 

92 



PTARMIGAN SHOOTING IN THE YUKON DELTA. 



FRED. G. PARK. 



It was while on the way to the new gold 
fields at Nome that our party chanced on 
the finest 2 hours' shooting any of us had 
ever experienced. 

Nearly 40 days of drifting coastward on 
the bosom of the mighty Yukon had put 
Dawson far behind and we found our- 
selves, a browned, weather-beaten, decid- 
edly hungry quintet, at the mouth of An- 
drefsky river. We had found the few sup- 
ply stations along the river not yet re- 
stocked for the summer and our larder, in 
consequence, had grown scant. 

We were within a few hours of the Yu- 
kon flats, where the waters of the great 
stream separate into innumerable deltas, 
each trending toward Bering sea and pre- 
senting in their sameness a decided puzzle 
to the inexperienced navigator. With the 
provision problem to be solved and the 
knowledge that we had already been too 
long on our journey, we beheld with joy 
the smoke of a steamer creeping swiftly 
downstream which proved, as she passed 
our camp and tied up at the trading-post, 
to be the Alaska Commercial company's 
freighter Bella. We speedily boarded her 
and engaged passage to St. Michael. 

It was with a touch of sadness in our 
hearts that we dismantled and abandoned 
the staunch little sailboat in which we had 
spent so many jolly days and which had 
borne us so safely through whirling rapids 
and driving storms, but with the quick 
adaptability of experienced travelers we 
soon made ourselves comfortable on board 
the big barge attached to the bow of the 
Bella, and when the gong sounded at sup- 
per time we devoured a well cooked, boun- 
tiful meal for the first time in days. A quick 
run brought us to the extreme mouth of 
the river early the following afternoon, and 
?s we passed out to sea, following a line of 
buoys marking the always uncertain chan- 
nel, we bumped squarely into a new sand 
shallow and stuck hard and fast despite 
the powerful efforts of the steamer to clear 
herself. 

There was nothing for it but to await 
the incoming tide, so we passengers pre- 
pared to kill time as best we could. It was 
a bright day, the sun tempering the soft 
breeze from the sea to a delightful warmth. 
To the West the long swells of the sea 
lazily heaved and smoothed away in broad, 
glassy planes, while through the hazy dis- 
tance the tops of an island or 2 snowed 
blue and restful. Northward and behind 
us stretched the endless flat waste, green 
with new born moss and glinting with 
numberless lakes. 



Only a boat's length separated us from 
the shore, so it was not long before a hunt- 
ing party was landed, armed with a most 
nondescript lot of firearms of various 
makes and bores. 

Within a few yards of the beach we be- 
gan putting up bands of ptarmigan until 
the air was full of them and the guns were 
popping away right merrily. The birds 
were fairly quick on wing, having a rather 
deceptive flight as to speed, arising to a 
level like the quail, only going much great- 
er distances before alighting. They had 
lost their beautiful snowy winter garb and 
put on a dull brown that blended with the 
cover from which they arose. 

After the first rise it was grand sport, 
for the birds scattered enough to make it 
uncertain just where the next would get up. 
They broke cover only when absolutely 
compelled to do so, and it was a frequent 
occurrence to have a bunch of lively brown 
feathers roar out from between one's feet 
and go hurtling off, in many instances un- 
touched by the shot sent after it. 

We found the flats interwoven with small 
lakes, none more than 2 acres in extent, 
all excellently grassed, and the homes of 
thousands of ducks and geese. These 
fowl seemed not in the least afraid of man, 
permitting us to approach within a few 
yards of themselves and their fluffy bodied 
broods, never offering to fly, and only pad- 
dling slowly away when the intruders 
seemed too close. Not one of these birds 
was killed by our party, though for 2 hours 
we were winding in and out among the 
lakes seeking ptarmigan hidden in the long 
moss and grass. Possibly we were the 
first human beings who had ever visited 
that spot. 

A long blast from the steamer's whistle, 
warning us that the tide was coming in, 
called our party on board once more, and 
an interested crowd gathered on the deck 
of the barge to count the game. About 180 
ptarmigan had fallen before 11 shot guns, 
loaded chiefly with No. 4's and B. B.'s, and 
one 44 Winchester rifle. Every man, the 
rifleman included, had killed his birds on 
the wing. Despite the number of birds 
killed in the brief time ashore, we could 
scarcely be classed as game hogs, as we 
were snooting for grub as well as for sport, 
and there were about 50 people on board to 
be fed. The nicely browned birds were a 
luxurious treat to our bacon-satiated appe- 
tites, and by the time we reached St. 
Michael only a few sacks of feathers, ap- 
propriated for pillows, remained to remind 
us of our 2 hours in Gameland. 

93 



CAMPING IN THE ADIRONDACKS. 



SYCAMORE. 



A man who is penned up in an office 
through the winter could not make better 
use of his 2 weeks' vacation than to take 
a trip to the Adirondacks ; and this region 
is within reach of limited pocketbooks. 

The outfit is important. The first thing 
to consider is your feet. They should be 
well looked after and properly dressed. I 
have found that the nearer I follow the 
customs of the guides and natives, not only 
in footwear, but in general dress, the better 
off I am. They wear either moose hide 
moccasins, with common rubber overshoes, 
or old leather shoes with soft soles. These 
are worn over heavy woolen socks, the 
trousers being folded and socks pulled over 
them, thus preventing the trousers from 
flapping around the ankles, getting caught 
in brambles, etc. I have found that moose 
hide moccasins, heavy socks and canvas 
leggings are the best. I have the soles of 
my moccasins topped with rubber soles, as 
one's feet are too tender to stand the sud- 
den change from shoes to the soft soled 
moccasins. Do not wear either leather or 
rubber boots. The former will blister your 
feet, the latter sweat and parboil them 
painfully. One need not get into water 
deeper than a few inches, and even if you 
get your feet wet the climate is such that 
it is almost impossible to catch cold. These 
moccasins are almost waterproof to the 
ankles ; they give perfect ease to the feet 
in the long tramps and enable one to travel 
through the woods without the slightest 
noise, which is an absolute necessity in deer 
hunting. The canvas leggings protect the 
trousers from getting caught in twigs or 
brambles and from getting wet by the early 
morning dews and wet grass. 

The next thing to avoid is the canvas hat 
and coat. They are noisy, and the swinging 
of your arms or the scraping of a twig on 
the canvas is remarkably loud in the still- 
ness that prevails in the depth of the wil- 
derness, and is often the means of losing a 
good shot. There is also great danger in 
wearing canvas clothes. Their color so 
closely resembles that of a deer that one is 
liable to "get a hole through his skin," as 
the guides put it. An old suit of heavy 
dark clothes, with coat that buttons close 
and has a belt, and a black felt slouch hat 
fill the bill. 

In addition to the cloth suit, one will de- 
rive much comfort from a heavy sweater, 
especially at night. A flannel outer shirt 
is the proper thing to wear in the shirt line 
at all times, and heavy underclothes are 
never uncomfortable except in July. 



If it is possible one in a party of 4 should 
take a rubber coat, for the special use, dur- 
ing wet weather, of the one whose duty it 
is to get wood and water and do odd jobs 
about camp. 

For a genuine camping and hunting trip, 
take only the necessaries of life. Provide 
yourself with an Adirondack pack basket, 
and do not take more duffle than will fill 
it, rifle and blankets excluded. With one 
of these baskets you have free use of your 
hands and arms in getting over logs and 
pulling yourself up river banks and steep 
places in the trail. 

I smile when I recall my first trip to the 
North woods. There were 4 in our party, 
each dressed as he thought best ; some in 
canvas and some in old wool clothes. Big 
grain sacks took the place of pack baskets, 
and these were loaded with 65 to 80 pounds 
each, including our guns and ammunition. 
These we carried in the only free hand we 
possessed to save us from eternity. Our 
launch into woods' life on that trip was a 
6 mile carry down a riffle of the Ohio river, 
and it was a severe test, rigged out as we 
were and not used to anything harder than 
the work one finds in an office. The 6 
miles seemed like 36 and our duffle to weigh 
200 pounds. Before we reached our desti- 
nation darkness overtook us and one may 
as well be in a coal mine as in the woods 
without a lantern. It became difficult to 
keep the trail, which in many places where 
there were pine needles was hard to follow 
even in daylight. My companion, M., and 
I brought up in the rear of our procession, 
carrying the tent between us on a pole, 
besides our duffle, which was no easy un- 
dertaking, as fallen trees across the trail 
occur every few hundred feet. Notwith- 
standing our precautions, we ran off the 
trail and walked into the bed of a stream 
which had dried up during the summer and 
was filled with fallen timber and brush of 
every description. M. was in the lead, and 
fell backward in trying to rid himself of 
the tent pole. Luckily the brush saved him 
from a heavy fall, but his pack bag fell 
through the brush, and being strapped to 
his shoulders, held him flat on his back, 
utterly unable to move. . In trying to help 
him I got into almost the same situation. 
We managed to stop the rest of the party, 
who were ahead and had been lucky enough 
to keep the trail. After shouting to them 
to wait, knowing it was useless for them 
to try to find us, we began our struggle 
for liberty. I do not doubt that our antics 
were laughable, but they were far from 



94 



CAMPING IN THE ADIRONDACKS. 



95 



amusing to us. We were almost exhausted 
before we got out and on the trail again, 
minus a box of matches and our entire 
stock of cuss words. This taught me never 
to go into the woods without a lantern. 

Aside from the tin kettles, frying pans, 
knives, forks, spoons, salt, sugar, butter, 
in fact all such articles of cookery, I always 
take in my pack basket a change of socks 
and underclothes, my heavy sweater and 
woolen sleeping cap, 2 or 3 bandana hand- 
kerchiefs, a pair of gloves, and a heavy 
blanket or sleeping bag. A small pillow tick 
to be filled with balsam will add much to 
one's comfort at night. If you go in be- 
fore the fall frosts do not forget your 
punky paste, which is also a good shield 
against mosquitoes. You will find use more 
than once for a needle and thread, a few 
buttons, some nails and a few feet of 
heavy cord. 

No man should go into the woods with- 
out a reliable compass, so secured that it 
can not be lost, and plenty of matches. A 
pipe, tobacco and fire water may be added 
according to taste. 

For a firearm on such a trip never take 
anything smaller than a 45-70 in black pow- 
der. Fifty cartridges are enough for a 3 
weeks' trip. For the best shooting I ever 
had I only used 10 shells during my stay. 
Do your target shooting at home. 



A guide is a necessity in a strange coun- 
try. Even if you know the country it is 
worth a good deal to have some one to do 
the cooking and other hard work. 

The best cover in camping is a log cabin 
leanto, with covered dining table and pan- 
try; but if one is moving camp each day or 
2, a tent is the quickest to erect and trans- 
port. In pitching it select high ground and 
dig a ditch 6 or 8 inches deep and 
wide all round the 4 sides to keep out the 
water in case of rain. If stopping for any 
length of time and using a tent, it is best 
to build a platform of logs and pitch the 
tent on that. 

July and August are the best months to 
go to the woods if you wish trout fishing 
and do not object to being eaten without 
mercy by black flies and punkies. The deer 
and grouse season opens August 15th, but 
I consider both unfit to eat so early and 
wish the State would shorten the season 
on both one month. I go for deer and 
grouse during September and October, by 
which time birds have strengthened after 
raising their broods and the young birds are 
in a fit condition to shoot. The deer have 
their new winter coats and have lost the 
moss from their horns, while the does have 
fattened after nursing their fawns through 
the summer, which weakens them and 
makes the meat unhealthful. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY CHAS. MARSOEN 



MIDWINTER RECREATION. 
Winner of 54th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



FISHERMAN'S LUCK. 



FREDERICK D. MARTIN. 



I sat beside a shady brook 

And cast my line with anxious look ; 

A fish was soon upon my hook, 

The line was yanked out taut ! 
I quickly grabbed my rod of cane 
With sundry shouts and words profane, 
And sadly gazed, with sheer disdain, 

Upon the fish I'd caught. 



I said a "fish" ; that is not right. 
It was a minnow, small and light ; 
A minnow that could hardly bite 

The bait which I had cast. 
A word -.from some great sage's pen 
Appealed unto my mind just then, 
The saying ran : "Try, try again ; 

Success will come at last." 



I followed out that maxim trite; 

I sat right there and fished till night; 

But not another faintest bite 

Did I get that sad day. 
For once that adage did not hold, 
That saying false as bogus gold ; 
I stand aloof from proverbs old, 

And things that sages say. 



A FREAK PHOTO 

Enclosed is a print. I should like to have 
you explain why the letter and the plank 
show through the horse's head. I have 
submitted it to 2 photographers and they 
are unable to offer any explanation. 

Thornwell Beach, Columbia, Ala. 




ama;eur photo by thornwell beach. 



The picture was evidently a time expos- 
ure. The horse held his head perfectly still 
until just prior to closing lens, when the 
head was switched around to the right side 
of body, allowing the letter and boards to 
be uncovered just long enough to act on 
the plate. That would necessarily give the 
impression that the horse's head was be- 
hind them. — Editor. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY CKAS. L. FULSTONE 

ARIZONA WEASEL. Putorius Arizoncnsis . 



Sheriff — Yes, that's Spike Moran, alias 
Big Eddy, alias Jim Thornton, alias Kid 
McDuff. He's a burglar. 

Stranger — But why do you let him live 
here? 

Sheriff — Jest to fat up the census. We 
put him in the directory under each name, 
you see. — Judge. 



Belle — You were always fond of flow- 
ers, were you not? 

Bob — Why, yes, except during a short 
interval in which I studied botany. — Puck. 



96 



OUR ANNUAL CAMPING TRIP. 



ALFRED C. FOX. 



One beautiful day in August we set out 
for our annual camping trip. There were 
4 of us and we had worked hard to earn 
our vacation. I do not think there could 
have been a more mixed crowd. Two were 
newspaper reporters, one was an embryo 
mechanical engineer, and Wilson, the lad 
with the long face, expected to become a 
minister. 

The C. M. & St. P. Ry. dumped us at the 
little town of Minocqua, Wisconsin, after 
we. had been looking at pine trees and 
swamps 18 hours. Minocqua is a metropo- 
lis containing one flagpole and a little row 
of general stores. 

By evening we had our camo all snug for 
the night. It was on the North bank of 
Little Tomahawk river ; among the pines in 
the heart of the famous lake district of 
Wisconsin. We were up with the sun, had 
our first real camp meal, and were soon 
fishing for muskalonge.. 

It is strange that a man can never entirelv 
forget his business. For instance Denton 
sat on the bank studying the working of 
his reel. 

"I tell you what it is, Wilson," he said, 
"I could improve on that multiplying gear 
and " 

He did not finish his sentence, for just 
then he got a "big one" on his line, and by 
doing some poor playing, he promptly lost 
his fish. That did not faze Denton. He 
was too accustomed to having his largest 
fish get away to let it bother him. He 
threw his line back into the stream and 
began to look about the landscape. 

"Say, fellows, there is enough waste pow- 
er in this stream to drive a plant that would 
light half of Chicago !" he called out. "All 
you would have to do would be to put a 
dam across that ridge and " 

That's as far as he got, for just then 



Falls said it would be a bully thing if Den- 
ton could be damned. 

Falls was the next one to demonstrate 
the fact that a man can't forget his business 
training. While I was walking along a 
slippery part of the bank, I had the ill-luck 
to slip and fall head first into that ice-cold 
stream. 

Before I had time to call for help or even 
realize what had happened. Falls was bend- 
ing over me, notebook in hand, and asking 
me what my name was, and about 50 other 
questions. He had already put down his 
head lines: Chicago Man Nearly Drowned! 
When I clambered out he was sore ; he 
hates to lose a story. 

We all learned something in those 2 
weeks. To tell the truth, we thought we 
knew a little about the woods, but we did 
not know what a little it really was. Wil- 
son learned that it is bad policy to sten 
out of a boat into water that looks as if 
it is only 3 inches deen, if you happen to 
be in a swamp at the time. We found him 
after he had been in mud un to his ears 
about an hour. He was badlv fazed, but 
said something about not minding the water 
so much, but it was the mud that he had 
not figured on. 

I believe we were the most impressed by 
what I learned. I know I shall never for- 
get it. I was taking a quiet stroll in the 
woods one morning, when I saw what I 
thought was a bobcat. Any wise fellow 
would have known by the smell what it 
really was, but as I was not wise, I let flv 
at it with my little Remington. My supposed 
bobcat did the rest. I went down to the 
river and got out of that suit of clothes as 
fast as I could. The fellows handed me 
some clean duds on the end of a pole. 
Hereafter when I see anything that looks 
like a bobcat, I am going to make my own 
tracks. 



A school teacher at Three Rivers asked 
her pupils the other day who Nero was. 
The only response came from a little fel- 
low who held up his hand. "Arthur," said 
the teacher, "do you know who Nero was?" 
"Yes, ma'am," he answered, proudly, "he's 
the one we sing about in our Sunday 
school." The teacher was unable to recall 
any song in gospel hymns where Nero was 
mentioned. 

"What is the song like, Arthur?" she 
asked. 

"Nero, my God to Thee," said the child.— 
Detroit Journal. 

97 



SUCCESSFUL BUTCHERS OF GRAY SQUIRRELS. 



Game is reported to abound in Centre county 
this year. The photograph herewith shows the luck 
which attended T. W. Kramer, R. H. Kramer 
and George Loneberger, of Bellefonte, on a 2 
days' gunning expedition through Brush valley. 
Some of the city sportsmen who visit the Centre 
county woods do not fare so well. — Philadelphia 
North American. 

- The faces of these men will prove in- 
teresting to every student of the nature 
and habits of the genus game hog. The 



in the muzzle of the gun to find out wheth- 
er or not it was loaded. The other 2 men 
look like girls dressed in men's clothing, 
and as if their proper place would be be- 
hind the notion counter in a department 
store, rather than behind a gun in the 
woods. It will be noticed that R. H. Kra- 
mer and \ George Loneberger use pump 
guns. What a glorious advertisement for 
the companies who make these pot hunt- 




T, W. KRAMER, 



R. H. KRAMER, 



GEORGE LONEBERGER. 



picture indicates that these men have about 
as much mental machinery in their heads 
as the wax figures in a dime museum. 
T. W. Kramer looks more like a man 
than either of the others, but even he does 
not appear to know enough to come in 
when it rains. It is strange he should 
ever have learned to load and fire a gun. 
If he had lived in the days of the muzzle 
loader, he would not have lived so long 
as he has, for he is of the kind who blew 



ers' weapons ! The same sissy boys are, 
no doubt, saving their odd dimes now to 
buy automatic guns. 

The real men of Bellefonte must certain- 
ly feel ashamed of these imitation men. It 
affords me great pleasure to record the 
names of this blooming trio in the game 
hog book. T. W. Kramer's number is 1,019, 
R. H. Kramer's is 1,020, and George Lone- 
berger's is 1,021. 



Sunday School Teacher — Now Tommy, 
can you tell me whose day this is? 

Tommy — Yes'm ; it's Bridget's. Delia had 
last Sunday out ! — Philadelphia Press. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



FOREST RANGERS AS GAME PROTECTORS. 
Hon. W. A. Richards, 

Commissioner of General Land Office, 
Washington, D. C. 
Dear Sir: 

I am informed that under existing rules 
and regulations of your department the 
forest rangers are simply requested, when 
appointed, to co-operate with the State au- 
thorities in which they serve in enforcing 
State game laws. This term "co-operate" 
is, as you know, flexible and may convey 
varied meanings to different men. 

I learn that a further regulation prohibits 
forest rangers from leaving the reservations 
to which they are assigned, except under 
orders ; that if a ranger follows a game 
law violator off the reservation, in case he 
arrests one on his own territory and takes 
him to a court outside the reservation, 
the ranger is subject to censure and to 
loss of pay for the time spent off the reser- 
vation. It seems to me it would be entirely 
in keeping with the general policy of the 
government regarding the protection of 
game to give all forest rangers authority 
and even positive orders, to enforce the 
game laws of the States in which these men 
serve and to provide that such rangers may 
leave their reservations in the discharge of 
such duty, for a stipulated period, without 
loss of pay. 

A California judge has held that a State 
game warden can not arrest an Indian for 
killing game on an Indian reservation at 
any time. This raises a question as to 
whether a State officer may go on govern- 
ment land in the discharge of his duty as 
such State officer. 

In order to forestall any such claims on 
the part of the law breaker it might be well 
to request the Secretary of the Interior to 
formulate rules in regard to the taking of 
game and fish within the forest reserves, 
such rules to be as nearly as possible identi- 
cal with the game and fish laws of the 
States in which the reserves are located. 

Will you not kindly consider these sug- 
gestions and let me hear from you by early 
mail, greatly obliging, 

Yours truly, 

G. O. Shields. 

Washington, D. C. 
Mr. G. O. Shields, 

New York. 
Sir: 

Referring to your letter relative to the 
co-operation of forest reserve officers in the 
matter of enforcing local game and fish 



laws, I have to advise you that this office 
insists that all forest reserve officers assist 
the State game officers in the enforcement 
of the game laws in every way practicable, 
consistent with their duties as forest re- 
serve officers. The assistance rendered by 
the officers of forest reserves consists gen- 
erally in reporting any violation of the 
game laws to the proper State officer, when 
it is possible. As a forest reserve officer 
is not authorized to arrest violators of the 
game law unless he has an appointment as 
deputy game warden, it would be useless to 
issue definite instructions relative to the for- 
est officers' actions in connection with ar- 
rests. 

It is impracticable to direct forest reserve 
officers to leave their districts and reserves 
in the interest of game protection ; first, be- 
cause of the fact that in many States suffi- 
cient funds are not appropriated to enforce 
the game laws, and if a forest ranger, who 
receives only a small salary, was required 
to leave his reserve for the purpose of 
making arrests for the violation of the 
game laws and to remain in some town with 
an added expense of subsistence, without re- 
imbursement from the State, it would ap- 
parently work a great hardship. A second 
reason why directions to leave the forest 
reserve in connection with the enforcement 
of game laws could not be given to ad- 
vantage is because most of the violations 
of the game laws occur during the summer, 
when the danger from fire and through 
trespass on the reserves is very great, and, 
if the reserve officers were compelled to 
leave their districts without the proper pro- 
tection, great destruction of the forests by 
fire might result. 

It is thought that forest reserve officers 
fully understand what is expected of them in 
the matter referred to by you, and no doubt 
render great assistance to State game offi- 
cers. It must be understood that this office 
does not object to forest officers leaving 
their districts and reserves for the purpose 
of prosecuting violators of the game laws, 
provided they can do so without prejudice 
to the reserve service. A reduction in sal- 
ary during such absence does not follow 
unless their expenses and salary are paid 
by State officials. It is suggested that if 
State authorities would confer with forest 
reserve officers and arrange some definite 
plan for the protection of the game, further 
good could be accomplished. In a great 
many instances, it has developed that State 
officers are under the impression that Fed- 
eral forest reserve officers are to devote as 
much time as is necessary to the enforce- 



99 



100 



RECREATION. 



ment of State game laws. If this condi- 
tion could be overcome and State officers 
would unite with Federal officers, the game 
laws would be comparatively safe from vio- 
lation. 

Your attention is called to my recommen- 
dation in regard to this matter on page 44 
in the report for icpor from which I quote : 

The provision in the Act of March 3, 1899, 
which has been reenacted annually, by which all 
forest officers and employees are required to aid 
in the enforcement of the local laws for the pro- 
tection of game and fish in their respective re- 
serves, has been of great service in those States 
or Territories where such assistance was desired. 

If there could be a unity of action between the 
Federal and State authorities great good could be 
accomplished in game protection. 

It is generally conceded that the larger game 
animals, now chiefly to be found in the moun- 
tains of the West, should be protected from ruth- 
less and wanton destruction. A Federal statute 
which would tend to harmonize State legislation 
on this subject, without creating a divided juris- 
diction over forest reserves, and which would not 
encroach on the proprietary rights of the States 
to control the game and fish within their respec- 
tive boundaries, would do much toward accom- 
plishing that purpose. 

I recommend that the attention of Congress be 
called to this subject. 

As to your question whether or not a 
State officer may go on government forest 
reserve in the discharge of his duty, I have 
to reply -that there appears to be no doubt 
of the State officer's authority in this mat- 
ter. The Act of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat, 
34-36), states: 

Jurisdiction, both civil and criminal, over per- 
sons within such reservation shall not be affect- 
ed or changed by reason of the existence of such 
reservation, except so far as the punishment of 
offenses against the United States therein is con- 
cerned; the intent and meaning of this provision 
being that the State wherein any such reservation 
is situated shall not, by reason of the establish- 
ment thereof, lose its jurisdiction, nor the inhab- 
itants thereof their rights and privileges as citi- 
zens, or be -absolved from their duties as citi- 
zens of the State. 

This office is always willing and anxious 
to render assistance in the matter of game 
protection in the forest reserves. The for- 
est reserve field force appreciates this fact. 
Any negligence on its part in this matter, 
if brought to the attention of this office, 
receives due consideration. 

Yours respectfull}'-, 
W. A. Richards, Commissioner. 



WHAT IS SPORT? 

REV. G. W. LUTHER. 

In March Recreation there was an ar- 
ticle entitled, "Sport or Meat?" At its 
close Mr. Farrell says, "I should like to 
hear more in regard to what our wild game 
is for." 

It seems to me self-evident that game 
exists for the very purpose for which it 
should be protected. That game is for the 
enjoyment of man, like everything else in 
this world, will not be denied If, then, it 
be true that wild creatures v/ere made for 



the pleasure of man, or as Mr. Farrell puts 
it, "for sport," surely they should be pro- 
tected in a way which will enable man to 
continue to derive sport from them. 

Sport is an inclusive term, but really 
means the pleasure which we get out of a 
thing. Our game should be so protected 
that the greatest possible pleasure may be 
realized from its presence. How to get 
the most pleasure out of game is the point 
on which men differ. 

Mr. F. tells us how to get the most sport 
out of a deer. First find its range, then 
get a pack of dogs on its track, mount your 
horse and follow. After covering miles of 
country and spending hours of time, bring 
the weary, half-dead creature to bay. to cap 
the mountain peaks of sportsmanly ecstasy 
by slaughtering it for sport. He says, 
"Killing an animal for meat is only butch- 
ery." No doubt this is true; but what 
shall we call killing for sport? Is taking 
life because we take pleasure in slaughter 
really a more commendable act than taking 
life because we are hungry? 

It is apparent that the word sport has 
as many shades of meaning as there are 
grades of men who carry guns. That is 
why we need game laws, and why I believe 
in Recreation and the grand work it is do- 
ing in endeavoring to find a more sane and 
humane definition of the word "sport." 
Surely no one who has a true interest in 
our game and the pleasure which can be 
derived from it, can fail to rejoice at seeing 
the definite change which is coming to those 
who read this magazine from month to 
month. 

My experience has been that sport is not 
in the killing of game or in any form of 
torture. That really decreases the pleasure. 
To kill for food or in self-defense is legit- 
imate, but it is not sport. 

There are few who do not relish well 
cooked game, but the man who would not 
rather hunt than eat could hardly be called 
a sportsman. To make a good shot with 
a favorite gun is a real pleasure, but a 
marksman is not necessarily a sportsman. 
This pleasure is not at all dependent on 
our wild game. To protect game simply 
for gun practice would be at least a low 
motive. 

After all is not the sport found in match- 
ing our cunning and prowess against that 
of the game we pursue? For years I lived 
where deer were plentiful, and though I 
never shot at one I derived as much 
sport from them as many who killed 
their allowance each year. To be able to 
come within a few yards of one of these 
beautiful creatures, to know that ears, eyes 
and nostrils almost perfect in their powers 
were unable to detect my presence, and, 
best of all, when the animal did see me, to 
behold his utter amazement at being de- 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



101 



feated at his own game without evil result 
to himself, gave me pleasure a thousand- 
fold greater than I could have derived from 
dogging him to exhaustion, or in seeing 
him fall dead from a rifle shot. 

Is not the sport really in the contest, 
just as it is in chess or any other game? 
There is no doubt some satisfaction in de- 
feating an opponent, but any game not 
worth playing for itself, no matter who 
wins, is not worth playing at all. 

Who has not seen men come in at night 
blue and ugly because they had not killed 
anything? They were not sportsmen. I 
have seen others who, though they brought 
home no carcass, were the embodiment of 
satisfaction and cheer as they recited the 
contests of the day. These were the real 
sportsmen, and I should like to see our 
wild game protected for them. 



A BUNCH OF BUTCHERS BRANDED. 

Loami, 111., Dec. 5. — The big rabbit hunt of the 
season came off today, with the following scores: 

Loami — G. T. Hall, 98; Bud Brown, 72; W. 
L, Turpin, 57; W. E. Sturgis, 55; Ed. Potter, 40; 
Melvin Workman, 40; Charles- Lemin, 39; L. B. 
Jarret. 38; S. E. Hall, 43; C. L. Vincent, 34 — 516. 
Oak Grove — W. G. Loving, yy; Peter Hunter, 
47; H. B. Angel, 49; Charles Wread, 32; William 
Workman, 32 — 322. 

The rabbits will be sold and the proceeds will 
go toward furnishing an oyster supper to the 
hunters and their families.— Springfield (111.) 
State Register. 

I wrote to all the persons named in the 
above item and received the following re- 
plies : 

In reply to yours will say that I did kill 
98 rabbits the day you speak of. 

G. T. Hall, Loami, 111. 
I killed 74. It is true. 

Bud Brown, Loami, 111. 
Yes, sir; the report is correct. 

Ed. Potter, Loami, 111. 
I killed 34 rabbits in a day. 

C. L. Vincent, Loami, 111. 
I killed 49 as reported. 

H. B. Angel, Oak Grove, 111. 
Yes; I killed 77 rabbits. 

W. G. Loving, Oak Grove, 111. 
I received your inquiry about my killing 
43 rabbits in one day. It is true, and as I 
have not hunted much in some years I 
was badly out of practice. 

S. E. Hall, Loami, 111. 
In regard to my killing 57 rabbits, the 
story is true. 

W. L. Turpin, Loami, 111. 

It is a fact that I killed 55 rabbits in one 
day. Could have killed more if I had not 
run out of shells. If it not too cold Mon- 
day, I expect to kill 40 or 50 more. 

W. E. Sturgis, Loami, 111. 

Will say that I killed 45 rabbits instead 



of 39. Could have killed more if I had 
not grown tired of carrying them about. 
Please send me a copy of Recreation. I 
have read it a good many times. 

C. J. Lemin, Loami, 111. 

You have all shown your bristles. Some 
of your letters show that you are illiterate 
men who could not be expected to know 
any better. Lemin, who says he has read 
some copies of Recreation, should have 
known that such butchery as he reports 
is abhorrent to all decent men. But the 
trouble is he has not reallv read Recre- 
ation.- He has probably glanced over a 
few copies, trying to find some reports of 
big slaughter like his own, on which to 
feast his savage tastes. The names of this 
bunch go in the game hog register as fol- 
lows : 

H. B. Angel, 1022. 
Bud Brown, 1023 
Ed. Potter, 1024. 
W. G. Loving, 1025. 
G. T. Hall, 1026. 
S. E. Hall, 1027. 
W. L. Turpin, 1028. 
W. E. Sturgis, 1029 
Chas. J. Lemin,, 1030. 
C. L. Vincent, 103 1. 
Melvin Workman, 1032. 
L. B. Jarret, 1033. 
Peter Hunter, 1034. 
Charles Wread, 1035. 
William Workman, 1036. 

— Editor. 



£1 ax 

■ e ' . 



PRIVATE LANDS AND THE HUNTING PUB- 
LIC. 
Your answer in November Recreation 
to Harvey Waite, respecting the right to 
fish and shoot on other people's property, 
brings up an interesting subject. The mat- 
ter is capable of settlement by proper 
Legislation, and I offer the following as a 
subject of debate : 

Let the State allow a substantial rebate 
from taxes of such land owners as will give 
up their right to exclude the public from 
their lands. Properly framed and admin- 
istered laws will then accomplish the most 
desirable results for the whole community. 

If you will look at this in all its aspects 
you will see how far reaching and complete 
such a system might be. In the first place 
the State would compensate the land owner 
for giving the use of a part or the whole 
of his land, during a certain part of the 
year, for healthful and otherwise beneficial 
recreation. In the second place, those 
wishing to keep a considerable quantity of 
the State's game and fish for their own ex- 
clusive use would individually pay for the 
privilege as they ought to do. The law of 
eminent domain is an unmitigated evil when 



102 



RECREATION. 



it obstructs passage across large districts 
without any compensating public benefit. 

There are plenty of sportsmen who can 
perfectly well afford an interest in a pre- 
serve, but who would not feel any enthusi- 
asm for such shooting. When things are 
cut and dried and organized for you, you 
feel as if your guide were a day nurse 
taking you out for an airing and feeding 
you through a rubber tube. I, for one, 
"wish to feel as if I were fishing and shoot- 
ing on equal terms with the rest of the 
world ; the love of the mystery of new 
surroundings will long prevent me from 
wishing to do the thing in the conventional 
way. 

It must be conceded that there are con- 
ditions under which preserves are right and 
beneficial. They are certainly better than 
inefficient laws and lax administrations. 
The cheap sport who wants to get a day's 
shooting for nothing is detestable. To draw 
a circle with a 15 mile radius around our 
great cities, within which no shooting 
would be permitted, would be quite reason- 
able. . To limit the bag to protect depleted 
disti s for a term of years, to impose 
special licenses on guns and hunting dogs 
are all available means if the machine 
can only be put in working order. At 
present, with half way laws, and half way 
enforcement, with farmers in some locali- 
ties feeding the birds through the winter, 
in place of its being done by wardens ; and 
with streams polluted by one man and pre- 
served by another, the owners of preserves 
have the best of the situation. 

Wm. M. Elliott, Baltimore, Md. 



WHERE TO GET GAME. 

I have received many inquiries from your 
readers in regard to the game in this sec- 
tion of country. On that point all the 
American sportsmen who have hunted in 
this section agree that we have more moose 
and caribou to the square mile than any 
other place in America, or possibly the 
world. Nevertheless, on account of the 
density of our forests the game is as hard 
to see as ghosts. With the exception of the 
lakes, this country is a jungle; and when 
the game is on the alert you must keep well 
to cover. 

Anyone who will write to James E. Pat- 
terson, McKeesport, Pa., or M. L. Shover, 
of Ostrander, Ohio, can get full information 
as to chances for getting game here. 

Mr. Shover killed 2 as fine specimens of 
caribou and moose as it would be possible 
to find anywhere. His caribou was a sight, 
and more than a sight; it was a miracle. 
It had 46 points, and the brow antler had 14 
points. It was undoubtedly a stranger to 
this side of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and 
probably came from Ugavie by way of 
Quebec. I had seen him alive 3 times, and 



saw him after Mr. Shover shot him. Out 
of some hundreds I never saw one like him. 

We had several real American sportsmen 
here last fall, and in all there were about 35 
moose killed in the vicinity of Chioman. 

From several letters I have received from 
sportsmen they seem to think I am a guide. 
This is , not so. I rarely guide anyone, 
though I^have engaged supplies, guides and 
teams for several Americans, but I have 
never charged them a cent, and will con- 
tinue on this line. 

I will cheerfully answer all inquiries to 
the best of my ability. I do this in order 
to protect strangers from sharps, who are 
to be found here as in all hunting countries. 

1 have no ax to grind. This is a lumbering 
country and there are several thorough 
woodsmen who make good guides, but none 
of them have any hunting camps, nor do 
they make a business of supplying parties. 
Sportsmen can get everything they need at 
Chipman, pay for it themselves, load it on 
wagons and go straignt to the hunting" 
grounds. Teams cost $3.50 to $4 a day, for 

2 horses, a lumber wagon and a driver. 
Guides charge $2 to $3 a day. We have 
trout and salmon in our rivers, but poor 
canoeing in summer on account of low 
water. The Salmon river is the only stream 
here that a canoe can be used on, and in 
a dry season it is difficult to run. 

P. H. Welch, Chipman, N. B., Canada. 



THE OVERLAND MAIL. 

L. L. BALES. 

A stranger to the Northland would be 
utterly lost on any of the vast reaches of 
frozen tundra found near the Bering sea 
coast of Alaska. Especially would he be 
so during one of the blinding snow storms 
that visit that section ; but the native to 
the tundra born, is as certain of his course 
as the wild goose in its unerring flight. 

One year ago last April I arrived at 
Captain Moore's place on the North mouth 
of the Yukon river, outward bound from 
Nome to Seattle. It was late in the sea- 
son and I was making a forced march with 
an important mail, including government 
dispatches and many love tokens, equally 
precious. Storm or no storm, the only 
thing to do was "mush." Although famil- 
iar with winter traveling in Alaska, usually 
alone, and accustomed to taking desperate 
chances, I hesitated before striking out in 
the bitterly cold, blinding, shrieking snow 
storm then raging. It was 1 p. m., and I 
had 25 miles to make across the tundra to 
a native igloo, near New Hamilton. 

Captain Moore suggested that I take a 
native and his dog team. I did so. We 
took a 5 mile pace and kept it up ; the 
native running- ahead of the dogs and I 
running behind the sleigh. The native 
never swerved from his course and only 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



103 



looked at his compass once. At first 
I thought he was using the wind for a 
guide. In reality, he was familiar with 
every bunch of brush, every depression and 
elevation of the tundra and every lake, 
swamp and stream. 

Our range of vision during the storm was 
not more than 30 yards and sometimes less. 
The wind shrieked and moaned . in that 
weird, lonesome way only heard in the far 
North. As the storm increased in fury and 
the snow swept by in great waves, on 
their crests, wreathed in robes of snow, I 
seemed to see a female form that cried. 
"Oh, man ! knowest thou the precious bur- 
den thou dost bear? Think of the gray 
haired fathers, lonely mothers, wives and 
children, sisters true and sweethearts dear, 
who are waiting for a token from loved 
ones in the North. Fail not ! Fail not !" 
With an effort I shook off the drowsy feel- 
ing that precedes death by freezing. The 
noble dogs rushed forward and out of the 
storm appeared the igloo. The overland 
mail was safe. 



sins. Poor old cloak ! It is a great won- 
der it has not been torn into strings long 
ago, but it is not large enough to cover the 
proceedings of these 2 men. Courtney's 
number in the game hog book is 1037 and 
Benson's is 1038. I am sorry Chief Joyner 
did not go with them so I could properly 
give him a number as well. — Editor. 



CHARITY NO EXCUSE. 

W. R. Joyner, chief of the fire department of 
Atlanta, Ga., who has become famous as an ama- 
teur chafing dish chef, was asked to cook and 
serve 100 quails at a dinner. The chief readily 
accepted the invitation but he was informed that 
he was not only to cook and serve the birds, but 
to furnish them. He thereupon selected M. G. 
Benson and G." C. Courtney, 2 members of the 
Atlanta fire department who are excellent shots, 
and told them to go out and kill every bird 
they could find. 

Courtney and Benson spent one day in the 
fields and woods with guns and dogs, and re- 
turned with 130 quails and 16 rabbits. — Georgia 
paper. 

I wrote Joyner as follows : 

I am informed that you instructed 2 of 
your firemen, named Courtney and Benson, 
to provide the quails for a dinner and that 
they did so, bringing in a string of 130 
quails and 16 rabbits as a result of one 
day's shooting. Will you kindly let me 
know if the report is true? 

You are correct in reference to Courtney 
and Benson, 2 members of this department. 
Last winter I promised a charitv organ- 
ization to furnish and serve for them a 
quail lunch to be cooked on chafing dishes. 
I thought the best way to get these quails 
was to have some one go out and kill them, 
so I selected Messrs. Courtney and Benson, 
both good shots. They were gone a little 
over a day and possibly got about a day 
and a half of hunting. The number killed 
was as you state. The birds were served 
and the charity organization succeeded in 
getting a neat little sum out of the lunch. 
W. N. Joyner, Atlanta, Ga. 

This is another case where a man bor- 
rowed the cloak of charity to cover his 



GAME NOTES. 
Local sportsmen would like to have 
somebody explain the present inequalities 
in the game laws of California. The limit 
on quail is placed at 25 a day. It is enough 
and to spare, though the birds are plen- 
tiful and increasing ; but why should the 
limit on ducks, which are few and rapidly 
diminishing in number, be held at 50 and 
their sale be permitted? Some local associ- 
ations have taken the matter in hand ; 
please help us stir up the rest in your col- 
umns. Can you call a man a game hog 
who stops within the legal limit? If so 
such beasts are numerous here. 

R. R. Cameron, Los Angeles, Cal. 

ANSWER. 

Yes, a man who kills 50 ducks in a day 
simply because the law of the State per- 
mits it is a hog, and no amount of white- 
washing or of legal sanction will make 
anything else of him. 

The laws in effect in 3 or 4 States which 
permit the killing of 50 ducks a day by 
each man are made at the instance of game 
butchers and in opposition to the wishes of 
decent sportsmen. Time will work changes 
in the minds of these bristlebacks and the 
bag limits will be reduced in all States to 
20 or 25 birds ; but that will doubtless be 
after most of the ducks have been killed. — 
Editor. 

An Indiana paper recently printed an 
item to the effect that James Wilson had 
killed 117 rabbits in less than 2 hours. In 
reply to a letter of inquiry I received the 
following : 

These are the facts : Seven of my friends 
and I decided to go rabbit hunting, sell the 
rabbits and expend the proceeds for an 
oyster supper for ourselves and families. 
Determined that my side should win, I was 
on the ground early, commenced shoot- 
ing as soon as it was light enough to see, 
and by sun-up I had killed 25 rabbits, get- 
ting them all off an 11 acre tract covered 
with wild grass. 

After breakfast I killed 94 more before 
1 o'clock, when my shells were exhausted ; 
making, in all, 119 rabbits before 1 o'clock. 
The 8 members of the party killed in all 
465. 

J. D. Wilson, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

You evidently have not the /emotest idea 
of what is meant by decent sportsmanship. 



104 



RECREATION. 



If you had, you would not openly boast of 
such vulgar and disgusting slaughter as 
this. Your number in the game hog book 
is 1039 and I regret I have not the names 
of your friends, so that I could brand them 
as well. — Editor. 



I was one of a party of 10 who were 
hunting recently in the Bow String coun- 
try. We killed about 1,700 ducks in 2 
weeks and could have killed 5 times the 
number had we so desired. The country 
was full of ducks, mostly blue bills. 

W. H. Magie, M.D., Duluth, Minn. 

As a matter of fact, the average kill of 
each man in your party does not seem to 
have been unreasonable in itself, but in the 
aggregate, you killed at least 15 times the 
quantity of game you should have killed. 
What legitimate use could 10 men make 
of 1,700 ducks, even in 10 days? Assum- 
ing that each man might eat 3 ducks in 
a day, or 30 in the 10 days, this would 
leave 1,400 ducks for the 10 men to bring 
home, or 140 to each man. This is sim- 
ply wasteful slaughter, and you and your 
party have contributed very largely to the 
general wiping out of the wild ducks. 
These are decreasing rapidly every year, 
and whije market hunters are mainly re- 
sponsible for this decrease, such reckless 
killings as you and your friends made in 
this instance, put you in the same class 
with the market hunters. — Editor. 



Your grand magazine seems, much to my 
discomfort, unalterably against the killing 
of gray squirrels. For 20 years past I have 
spent a few days each season in the oaks and 
hickories of this section, looking for grays, 
and have found true sport in the hunt. I 
know of no more foxy and interesting game 
than gray squirrels and of no more dainty 
dish than squirrel pot pie. With my good 
old uncle, than whom no truer sportsman 
ever lived, I have passed many a happy and 
healthful day in this sport and I wish to 
continue. I do not claim to know it all and 
if you can convince me that my ambitions 
in this line are misplaced I am ready to 
be convinced. Last fall I visited a good 
farmer's woods and killed 6 grays before 
4 p. m., just as the wind was going down 
and the animals were moving. Then I un- 
loaded my gun and left the woods, though 
other squirrels were dropping nut shells 
in all directions. I had had my fun and 
was willing to go home. If all hunters 
would do the same and not hog it I believe 
that no good sportsmen would object. 

C. A. L., Portsmouth, N. H. 



true has never been written. Yes, we love 
that sort of thing. The equine veteran of 
those far Western wilderness trails, whose 
delightful pen and photographic portraits 
you have given us, was a horse to know 
and to love on the trail. How fit he looks 
as he stands for a cruise in a timber tangle, 
with rifle slung on the Indian side of the 
horse, and in the safest possible position 
for the work in hand. I wondered as I 
looked on the picture, if he would let you 
step into the saddle from the white man's 
side of the horse. 

Dr. A. J. Woodcock, Byron, 111. 



Some time ago a clipping was sent me, 
stating that one Alec Mermod, of St. Lo.uis, 
(probably the well known Smart Aleck) 
went to Louisiana last spring and with a 
friend killed 200 jack snipe in 3 days. The 
clipping further states that Mermod uses 
a pump gun. I wrote him as follows : 

I am informed you and a friend recently 
bagged 200 snipe in 3 days. Will you kind- 
ly tell me if this report is true. 

To which he replied : 

None of your damn business. 

Mermod evidently reads Recreation and 
knew what was coming. This is where he» 
differs from most of the ignorant game 
butchers who use pump guns. All the sam-\ 
Mermod goes down in the game hog book 
as No. 1040. — Editor. 



Having hunted around Grand Rapids I 
was mildly interested in Card's attempt to 
be funny in a recent number of Recre- 
ation. He has a bad reputation as a game 
killer. I have heard him tell of killing 
50 to 60 deer in a season for the lumber 
camps North of Grand Rapids, and having 
worked in those camps I believe his story. 
He also claims to have killed 100 deer in 
one season in Michigan. Card is only one 
of many camp hunters, and if they were 
all in jail it would be a blessing to the 
country. It is no wonder that game is 
disappearing while these outlaws are at 
large. G. S., Monterey, Minn. 



"The Personnel of the Pack Train" is 
the real thing as many of us know by ex- 
perience. A sketch mere sympathetically 



Black bear and deer were killed within 2 
miles of this place last fall. Ruffed grouse 
and woodcock are scarce. It is no wonder, 
for one year 2 pot hunters killed 945 grouse 
These men now claim that foxes extermi- 
nate the grouse. Last fall they waged 
war against the foxes and killed nearly 40 
in 6 weeks. Rabbits and squirrels are plenti- 
ful. The latter are rarely hunted. Many 
ducks and geese pass this way but seldom 
stop save in spring. 

H. J. Kingsley, Salisbury, N. Y- 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kingtish-^-Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September/ Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
shedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-fish, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel — Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Head. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs, 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait : Skinner crab. Time and tide : Day, flood. 

Blackfish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime, flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide: Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish _ August to No- 
vember. Haunts: Rivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead— June to October Haunts: Surf 
and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: Surf, all tideways. Baits: Shedder 
crabs, surf mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. 

Blue Fish — Horse Mackerel. June to November 
1st. Haunts: Surf, open sea 'and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



LAND LOCKED SALMON AT LAKE SUN- 
AFEE. 

G. H. GRAHAM. 

A question often heard as summer draws 
near, is : "Where is there a good place to 
fish for trout or salmon, that is not too 
far away or too expensive?" 

The past 10 years I have spent my vaca- 
tions at Lake Sunapee, N. H., where from 
the moment the tourist steps from the train 
onto the steamboat landing his eyes are de- 
lighted with the splendor of the scenery 
around him. The lake is ! /2 to 3 miles 
wide, 10 miles long and is 1,300 feet above 
sea level. It is about half way from Con- 



cord to Claremont, on the Boston and 
Maine railroad. 

The trout and salmon fishing is good and 
the bass fishing excellent. This is due to 
the pains taken by the New Hampshire Fish 
Commissioners to stock the lake properly 
and protect it. 

In May and June land locked salmon are 
taken by fly casting, or by trolling with a 
phantom minnow, or an archer spinner ; 
but in July and August they are taken by 
still fishing or deep trolling. It is important 
to have the right sort of tackle. Take 
strong rods, a large net, perfect running 
reels, good lines, leaders and hooks, and 
be sure your tackle is all right before you 
start. 

The fishermen who are most successful 
in taking salmon and trout at Sunapee first 
put out a buoy where the water is 60 to 70 
feet deep. They fasten their boat to this 
buoy every time they go out, and fish in 
the same spot all the season. The bait used 
is smelt, which are caught at the bottom 
of the lake by using a heavy sinker and a 
small trout hook baited with a tiny piece of 
smelt. 

As soon as the lake water begins to get 
warm the smelt go to deep water where it 
is cold, and trout and salmon go there to 
feed on them. It is for this reason that 
we fish in deep water. As soon as you have 
put out your buoy it is well to scatter some 
coarse corn meal around, to attract the 
smelt. The meal should first be soaked, so 
it will sink rapidly. Let your smelt line 
down to the bottom, and then raise it about 
a foot. When the fish bite draw them in 
carefully, as they are tender. I have found 
it an excellent plan to carry along a piece 
of ice and keep the smelt in ice water. They 
will live all day in this way. 

Bait the salmon hook by putting it 
through a smelt just in front of its back 
fin, letting the hook come out toward the 
head, or by hooking it through the mouth, 
fastening the upper and lower jaws togeth- 
er. Let your bait down 35 to 40 feet, 
changing it every 15 or 20 minutes, as live 
bait is best, although salmon often take 
dead smelt. Start fairly early as it is easier 
to catch smelt when the lake is still. 

If you are fortunate enough to hook a 
big salmon, don't be in a hurry to get him 
into the boat ; take plenty of time and you 
will be almost sure to save your fish. 

My experience with a 14 pound land 
locked salmon, last July, may be of interest 
to some readers. There were 3 of us in 
the party and we left camp about 7.30 for 
one of the salmon grounds. We fastened 
our boat to the buoy we had previously 



105 



io6 



RECREATION. 



put down and soon had a good supply of 
smelt, which we kept in ice water. We 
caught several good sized trout, but it was 
1.30 o'clock before I hooked a salmon. He 
went to the bottom at once and began to 
sulk. We soon found that the fish had 
made a circle around the boat and taken 
in all of our lines and the anchor rope. The 
anchor had to be drawn up and all the 
lines cut away before we could free the 
line on which I had my fish. All the time 
this was being done the fish stayed at the 
bottom. Soon after it began to pull down 
the lake and towed us fully 400 feet. We 
had out 200 feet of line and in no way could 
I induce the salmon to come up from the 
bottom. One of the party rowed us back 
up to the fishing ground and then down we 
went again. 

It was not until 4.30 o'clock that the fish, 
which now had out 250 feet of line, made a 
run toward the boat and jumped fully 5 
feet into the air. He went down again, 
taking out 200 feet of line; but he was 
about exhausted and was soon safe in the 
landing net. 



WHERE TO GO IN MAINE. 

Trout fishing is always good in the Dead 
river region of Maine in May, June and 
the latter part of July. There are a few 
lakes here where trout, salmon and pickerel 
take either fly or bait every day in the sea- 
son. Generally the trout in such lakes run 
small. The best lakes are 3 to 20 miles 
back from the settlement and from 1,800 to 
3,000 feet elevation. The country is moun- 
tainous, Mt. Bigelow, 3 miles South of here, 
being 4,947 feet above sea level, and the 
second highest in Maine. Hundreds of 
square miles of forest, . lake, meadow, bog, 
farm and mountain land can be seen from 
Bigelow. The Canadian boundary moun- 
tains, Moosehead lake, Mt. Washington and 
the New Hampshire hills are all in view. 
People can not buy such pure water as is 
wasted by our thousands of springs and 
some of these will do wonders for an inva- 
lid in 2 or 3 weeks. 

To the angler who also values the camera 
this region is a paradise. The great amount 
of large and small game to be found about 
the waters early in the season gives many 
a chance to make photographs that money 
could not buy. If the camera artist is cool 
and knows how to use a good outfit I will 
undertake to do the rest. I am not only 
a practical guide and hunter but can work 
in sympathy with an artist. 

There are hundreds of old log driving 
dams, tumble down hunter's camps, lumber 
camps, canyons, cascades, falls, rapids, lakes, 
bogs, rivers, streams, brakes, all rich pick- 
ing for the camera enthusiast. 

Flagstaff, where Benedict Arnold laid 



over in winter camp, on his way to Quebec, 
is a backwoods hamlet and is headquarters 
for parties of anglers. The big cities can be 
reached by telephone and telegraph, but you 
can get away from all improvements of that 
kind and live in any stage of primeval for- 
est life you choose. 

The real hunter, angler and lover of na- 
ture I advise to camp out or go on a knock- 
about canoe trip. Those in search of rest 
can go to the regular camps where you have 
not only the rough comforts, but any rea- 
sonable extras you may care for. 

Bring warm wraps and underclothing. 
Our weather is clear and bracing nearly all 
the time. Price of board and boats or canoe 
run from $1 to $3 a day, and less by the 
week or month. Professional guides work 
for $3 a day and board ; canoe 50 cents a 
day. You can get a boy or a fake for a 
song, but you'll have to sing it and you 
won't forget the song for some time. 

My only guarantee is to give my patrons 
a square deal, and a successful trip. 
Our interests are mutual and I am looking 
for future business. I refer to Dr. R. Lee 
Banister, La Fontaine, Indiana ; Ralph E. 
Bassett, Bassett, N. J.; Geo. M. Wallace, 
New Haven, Conn. ; Julius Berger, 368 Cen- 
tral avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Buy your 
return ticket on the Boston and Maine 
railroad for Flagstaff. Make your arrange- 
ments early, give me all details in first letter. 
I will make special arrangements if desired. 
H. R. Horton, Flagstaff, Me. 



CAN PICKEREL CUT? 

In your reply to Mr. Gordon Wrighter's 
fish-snake story in March Recreation, I 
note you claim that the stories of pickerel 
cutting lines "are all rot." My occupation 
being that of guide for 15 years, I have had 
much experience in fishing, especially for 
pickerel. I have always been observant, 
trying to get at the scientific points in con- 
nection with fishing as much as possible, 
and I am sorry that I am compelled to 
take exceptions to your remark. If I have 
been of the wrong impression all these 
years, and if my experience has been in vain 
on this point, I wish to know it. 

I know that pickerels' teeth straggle 
around some and are not set for cutting, 
but still the teeth are thick on top of the 
tongue. I doubt the ability of a 3 or 4 pound 
pickerel to break a line that will sustain a 
dead weight of 18 to 20 pounds, such as I 
have seen severed by them many times. 
My theory is, the fish either gets the hook 
down in his mouth or gets it wound around 
himself and drawn through his mouth. 
While the line is at a tension it saws 
through his mouth and is drawn across the 
sharp, needlelike points of his teeth and is 
cut, sometimes clear off, but often only deep 
enough so it will break before the fish is 



FISH AND FISHING. 



107 



exhausted ; especially if the cutting is early 
in the game. 

I always examine the line after I land a 
fish. Many times have I landed a macker- 
el and found the line nearly severed ; some- 
times in several places, near the hook. I 
have often seen old anglers attach a wire 
snell 6 or 8 inches long above the hook to 
save its being cut by the fish's teeth. When 
you see a pickerel get a line wound around 
him and drawn through the jaws, you can 
wager that chances are 2 to 1 against your 
landing him, if he is not already played 
out. Why is it that so many times the line 
breaks near the hook? A short dis- 
tance above the hook where the line is 
wound up to the tip of the rod, it often gets 
badly worn by casting and breaks easily, 
but I have seen new lines severed there 
without even' this excuse. 

I should be pleased to have the opinion 
of some experienced angler besides your- 
self on this question, and if I am wrong, I 
should like a more explicit explanation. I 
am sure that most disciples of the rod are 
familiar with the conduct of the pickerel. 
O. L. Thomas, Dorset, Minn. 

I did not question your statement that you 
have had pickerel break your line or fray 
it out, or saw it in 2. That is not the 
point I raised. Mr. Gordon Wrighter said 
the pickerel cut the snake in 2. I ques- 
tioned that statement, and I still maintain 
that a pickerel's teeth are not set for cut- 
ting. The pickerel may have torn the snake 
in 2 and may tear a line in 2, and has done 
it many a time. I should, however, be glad 
to hear from other anglers and from some 
ichthyologist as to whether a pickerel can 
cut a snake or a fishing line in 2 "as if it 
had been done with a knife." — Editor. 



THE SHORT CASTING ROD. 

We often read articles about catching 
large and small mouth black bass by the 
method known as bait casting, with line 
and artificial bait. Without exception the 
writers advise the use of a rod 7 to 9 feet 
in length. I recently read an article by a 
veteran bait caster, whom I have always 
accepted as an authority on the subject, say- 
ing that no rod shorter than 8 feet should 
be used, giving as a reason that a fish could 
not be played properly with a shorter rod. 

While I do not wish to contradict these 
veterans of the gentle art in a disrespectful 
spirit, I do say that a person can be as true 
a sportsman and get as much true sport by 
using a much shorter rod. 

The rod I have used the past 2 seasons, 
and expect to use many more, is a 4 foot 
S l /2 inch solid silk, with agate tip. After 
much experimenting I consider this rod just 
right for a man of average height, say 5^2 
feet. 



The rod must not be so stiff that the line 
will have to support all the strain should 
the fish make a sudden rush for liberty ; 
neither should it be too flexible, else it tires 
the wrist and is not accurate. The proper 
stiffness can only be ascertained by much 
practice, and when the fisherman once finds 
a rod to fit him he should take the best of 
care of it, as he may have not a little 
trouble in getting another. 

An inexperienced person would naturally 
think that the longer the rod the longer the 
cast; this is not true, as some of the best 
casters use comparatively short rods in tour- 
nament work. 

A long rod is unwieldy and inaccurate. 
The nearer the hand is to the bait, within a 
reasonable limit, the easier it is to control it. 

A good outfit for the beginner is the fol- 
lowing: A solid silk lancewood rod, 4^2 
feet long, with double grip, large guides, 
agate or steel tip and finger trigger. A 
good 80-yard quadruple multiplying reel — 
the Shakespeare Standard does nicely. The 
line is important; and if one must econo- 
mize let it be on something else. I find the 
Martin "Slickest" line thoroughly reliable. 

For bait I prefer live frogs used on weed- 
less hook with the Turn-a-frog device. If 
these can not be obtained, I use the Hark- 
ouf Wooden Minnow No. 5, the Kayro Pork 
Pine bait or the old style aluminum spinner. 
L. J. Tooley, Kalamazoo, Mich. 



FISHING NEAR SAN JOSE. 

Leaving San Jose at 5 a. m., May 14th 
last, my friend Mr. Shinamon and I started 
for the mountains on our wheels. After 
riding 9 miles we reached the foothills. 
Then 3 miles more of ascent up Guadaloupe 
creek took us to the end of the road. Leav- 
ing our wheels at an old Mexican rancho, 
we pushed up the gorge 3 miles farther, 
reaching the headwaters at 8 o'clock. We 
were then in the heart of the Santa Cruz 
mountains, at the base of Loma Prieta, the 
highest peak in that range. 

The scenery was grand, the creek at that 
point coming down through a chasm so 
wild that no trout ever go above that place. 
The water was clear and as cold as ice. 
Starting in there we fished until 11, when 
we stopped to eat our lunch. I had caught 
6 trout, while my companion had not got a 
fish. We had been using worms all the 
morning, thinking them the best bait, but 
at length we tried flies. Then our sport 
began. The creek was alive with trout and 
in a short time we had taken a dozen 
apiece. Then we quit. Had we tried flies 
in the morning we could easily have taken 
twice as many trout had we wished. 

Wildcats, foxes and coons are numerous 
in that locality and occasionally a deer 
is found. We felt well paid for our trip, 
and were surprised to find such good sport 



io8 



RECREATION. 



within 12 miles of a city of 35,000 inhabi- 
tants. 

I heartily endorse your magazine and 
would not be without it. 

H. A. Farnham, San Jose, Cal. 



yond the eye ; scales rather large ; young 
always with a blackish lateral band. — 
Editor. 



POINTS OF IDENTIFICATION. 

Has the common speckled, or brook trout, 
scales? 

What is the difference between a catfish 
and a bullhead? 

W. H., Dodgeville, N. Y. 

ANSWER. 

The speckled, or brook trout, as well as 
all other members of the Salmonidce family, 
has scales, notwithstanding Lowell's trip- 
let: 

"One trout scale in the scales I lay 
(If trout had scales), and 'twill outweigh 
The wrong side of the balances." 

The scales are always there, and, however 
small, may be counted. 

All of our catfish and fresh water bull- 
heads belong to the Siluridce, or catfish 
family. That family is represented in our 
fresh waters by several genera. The large 
catfishes of the Mississippi basin belong to 
the genus Ictalurus and are invariably called 
catfish. Another large species, Leptops oli- 
varis, also found in the Mississippi basin, 
is usually called yellow cat, mud cat, or 
goujon. There are many species of little 
catfishes known as stone cats or mad Toms. 
They belong to the genera Noturus and 
Schilbeodes. Lastly, there are about 12 spe- 
cies belonging to the genus Ameirus, which 
often go by the common name of bullhead. 

"Don't talk to me o' bacon fat, 
• Or taters, coon or 'possum; 

Fo' when I'se hooked a yaller cat, 

I'se got a meal to boss 'em." 

— The Darkey and the Catfish. 

B. W. E. 

NIBBLES. 
I wish to settle a dispute between 2 local 
anglers. We recently caught several bass 
and there was an argument as to whether 
they were black, small mouth, or Oswego 
bass. Can you tell me how to identify the 
small mouth bass ? 

W. F. Hartenstine, Morristown, N. J. 

The small mouth black bass should have 
about 17 rows of scales on the cheek, 
counting the rows downward and back- 
ward from the eye to the edge of the pre- 
opercle, or anterior gill cover. The large 
mouth bass has only 10 rows of scales on 
the cheek. Taking other characteristics, in 
the small mouth black bass the mouth is 
moderate in size, the maxillary in adult not 
extending beyond the eye ; scales small ; 
young more or less barred or spotted, 
never with a black lateral band. In the 
large mouth black bass, the mouth is very 
large, the maxillary in adult extending be- 



While fishing along a brook near here, 
I saw something that had a body like an 
eel's, with 2 fins near its head, and that was 
light pink in color. I have never heard of 
anything like it and should be much obliged 
if you would tell me what it is. It was 
about a foot long and went through the 
water with a motion like that of a snake. 
Maurice Sherman, Norwich, Conn. 

ANSWER. 

The description suggests the mud eel, 
Siren lacertina, a batrachian belonging to 
the family Sirenidcr, but the mud eel is not 
known to range so far North as Connecti- 
cut. It is more likely that the animal you 
saw is a mud puppy, Nec.turus maculosus, 
or some species of salamander. Your des- 
cription is too brief for definite identifica- 
tion. — Editor. 



Did you ever hear of Balsam lake, Wis- 
consin, as a bass ground? I was there last 
fall and the number of black bass and pike 
was wonderful. 

F. M. Greenlaf, Omaha, Nebr. 



VACATION. 

J. D. L. SCHOONOVER. 

What ef th' sun is sizzlin' hot? 

I'm happy as c'n be ; 
At las' vacation time is here, 

An' I c'n jes' run free. 
An' I'm agoin' to start an' do 

Exactly what I please — 
Ain't goin' to tip my hat to girls, 

Or smother any sneeze. 
I'm goin' to start right off to-day 

To jes' try an' ferget 
All I've been teached these last nine 
months, 

An' I'll get there, you bet! 
I'll learn more things 'bout butterflies 

'An teachers ever know ; 
Why eels an' snakes is jes' my size, 

An' I know where they grow. 
Say, I could tell our principal 

'Bout where to ketch th' bass, 
But I ain't a-goin' to favor him 

With nuthin' now but sass. 
An' ef my teacher wuz to want 

A little sumthin' done, 
Another, feller'd do th' work; 

Vacation has begun ! 
I ain't a-goin' to min' no one 

I'm jes' a-goin to see 
Th' greates' time 'at ever wuz 

In my own history ! 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 

Anybody can shoot all day but a gentleman always quits when he gets enough. 



OTHER EDITORS CONDEMN THE AUTO- 
MATIC. 

An editorial in the November number of 
Recreation takes up the subject of auto- 
matic guns and handles it in a manner that 
will be especially pleasing to the true sports- 
men of the country, and to the general pub- 
lic that is opposed to the ruthless slaughter 
of birds of song and plumage as well as 
to the wholesale killing of game birds. The 
article is drawn out by the invention of an 
automatic gun. The editor of Recreation 
declares that any reasonable man, no mat- 
ter how eagerly he may seek the mighty 
dollar, should be satisfied with the weapons 
already on the market for destroying Ameri- 
can birds and wild animals. He adds fur- 
ther that we have repeating rifles, repeating 
shot guns, double barrel and single barrel 
shot guns by the million, and with these the 
birds and wild animals have been reduced to 
pitiable remnants of their once great num- 
bers, but now, as if not satisfied with the 
slaughter which has been and is being car- 
ried on, the big gun houses are putting out" 
still more murderous engines of destruc- 
tion, for market hunters and pot hunters. 

Many people who have not kept up with 
the developments of recent years in the way 
of firearms may not know what is meant 
by an automatic gun. It is simply this : 
A gun with a magazine holding a number 
of cartridges which may be discharged as 
fast as a man can pull the trigger. The 
shooter jumps a bunch of quail, ducks or 
geese, cocks his gun and fires. The recoil 
of the first shot throws out the empty shell, 
throws a new one into the chamber, and 
cocks the gun ready for another shot. From 
that on, all the shooter has to do is to swing 
the muzzle of his gun from one bird to 
another and pull the trigger until the last 
shot is fired. Pistols built on this plan 
hold 7 to 10 cartridges, and it is possible 
to fire all of them in less than 2 seconds. 
The magazine of an automatic shot gun 
holding 6 cartridges could be emptied as 
quickly, and if the shooter were an expert, 
as many of the game butchers are, it would 
be possible to kill 10 or more birds out of 
a covey before they could get out of reach. 

The repeating rifle has been an important 
factor in wiping out the big game of this 
country. The pump gun, so-called, has pro- 
ven little short of a national calamity. An 
automatic shot gun would be a disgrace to 
the nation, and its introduction should be 
prohibited by law. This may not be, but 
the sale of any such weapon to decent 
sportsmen can be prevented by the creation 
of a proper sentiment. — Detroit, Mich., 
paper. 



The latest thing in shot guns is an auto- 
matic firearm that may be fired 6 times, as 
fast as the shooter can pull the trigger. 
The recoil 'of the first shot throws out the 
empty shell, sends a new one into the cham- 
ber, and cocks the gun ready for another 
shot. An agitation protesting against the 
sale and use of the gun has been started 
by G. O. Shields, editor of Recreation. His 
contention is that the use of the automatic 
gun will hasten the extermination of all the 
game birds in America. One of the new 
guns was exhibited at Barre during the 
Brunswick club field trials, and sorrow was 
expressed by a number of sportsmen that 
such a gun should have been invented, as 
the rapidity with which it may be fired is a 
sure indication of the speedy destruction 
of any game going in front of it, no mat- 
ter how poor a shot the hunter may be, for 
at least 5 shots may be fired in the time 
that 2 could be fired from the ordinary 
double-barrel piece. — Worcester, Mass., 
Evening Post. 



A NEW LOAD FOR THE KRAG-JORGENSEN. 

Owners of high power rifles using the 30- 
40 Krag-Jorgensen military cartridge, who 
have vainly wished for an inexpensive load 
for short and mid ranges, as well as for use 
in hunting animals up to and including deer, 
should extend a vote of thanks to Dr. Hud- 
son, the well known rifle shot, to Mr. Bar- 
low, of the Ideal Manufacturing Co. and to 
the Laflin and Rand Powder Co., for their 
services in this direction. 

Thousands of riflemen have pondered 
over this riddle which, briefly stated, is 
as follows : 

Can a lead bullet without a jacket be 
fired from a high power rifle without strip- 
ping and leading the barrel to the destruc- 
tion of accuracy and power? The men 
named have solved the problem, and here is 
the how : 

Dr. Hudson and Mr. Barlow together de- 
vised a bullet composed of an alloy of 80 
per cent, lead, 10 per cent, tin, and 10 per 
cent, antimony. This mixture, properly 
fused and moulded, gives a bullet of nearly 
the specific gravity of lead, with a surface 
that has a resisting strength equal to that 
of a jacketed bullet. Brother Barlow in- 
jected into the formula an idea of his own 
in fashioning the front shoulder of the bul- 
let, which first engages the grooves and 
bands of the rifling. This shoulder makes 
the path of the bullet free, in that it cuts 
away the fouling of the preceding discharge 
and its value may be guessed when it is 



109 



no 



RECREATION. 



said that after 50 shots, the inside of the 
barrel is practically clean. The new pow- 
der is a mixture of round pellets that look 
like pepper and salt. This powder, the 
Laflin and Rand Co. calls "Marksman." 
Its value lies in the fact that the gas gen- 
erated by the primer, or explosion, is cool ; 
hence it does not melt the base of the Hud- 
son-Ideal bullet. The heat from this pow- 
der, as an explosive in a gun barrel, may be 
conservately estimated at less than 20 per 
cent, of that of any other powder. On this 
account it may do away with jacketed bul- 
lets entirely, for we all know the jacket, in 
preventing fusion of the base of the bullet, 
found therein about half of its value. 

Hitherto these high power rifles have had 
little value except in military service. Their 
extreme range and killing power rendered 
them unsafe in the woods and no sane man 
would discharge one at an ordinary target 
in close proximity to civilization. You 
need not now, however, throw away your 
Krags, for with the improved Hudson bul- 
let and 15 grains of Marksman powder, you 
can with one of the Ideal tools, produce 
a cartridge that has a velocity of 1,500 feet 
a second and sufficient penetration and 
shock to kill a deer at 125 yards. As a tar- 
get load at 200 yards if your barrel is true 
and you know how to hold and pull you 
will get on the 8-inch black most of the 
time. 

As to other high power rifles of different 
caliber than the Krag, the Hudson-Barlow 
30-40 load may be taken as a basis experi- 
mental unit, on which to work out other 
loads of value adaptable to the multiplicity 
of calibers and powder charges. 

Ex-Ordnance Sergeant, Baltimore, Md. 



DENOUNCES THE SHOT GUN. 

In April Recreation I notice an article 
by a Western friend who says that shot 
guns are the invention of the devil and are 
fit only for game hogs. The extensive use 
and misuse of that weapon in this vicinity 
is responsible for the rapid disappearance 
of our small game, and to say that I agree 
with Mr. Brass is only a mild expression 
of my opinion. There may be some true 
sportsmen in this city, but they are not 
much in evidence when it comes to pro- 
tecting game. A walk along a river or 
through the woods within 50 miles of this 
city will convince the most skeptical that 
our animals and birds are ruthlessly hunted, 
for every little while one meets a city hog 
with his double barreled exterminator over 
his shoulder. The worst of it is that many 
of these chaps will have more game than 
they can use in a month and all of them 
much more than any sane man would kill. 
If these so called hunters would use a small 
caliber rifle game would have some show. 



A 30-30 should be the limit of rifle power. 
Any game that lives can be killed by that 
caliber and for most animals the short 
range guns are plenty strong enough. I 
have used only a 30-30 for a long time and 
I do not want a more satisfactory gun. A 
100 grain bullet and a light powder charge 
makes an ideal load for ordinary use, and 
it is accurate up to 100 yards. A heavier 
bullet and a larger charge of powder will 
give a load good for 200 yards. I use 
smokeless powder because of its cleanliness. 

When a man tells me he can not get the 
game with a rifle and so has to use a shot 
gun, I advise him to buy a rifle and then 
practice at a tin can until he learns to shoot. 
If game is not worth doing a little work for 
it is not worth killing. 

A repeating rifle is not objectionable if 
rightly used, but the trouble with young 
shooters is that they persist in using the 
magazine when there is no reason for it. 
My own repeater is used as a single shot 
50 times to once as a repeater. 

There is now an effort being made to 
organize a rifle club in this city and to in- 
terest local hunters in the rifle as a substi- 
tute for. the shot gun. It is intended to 
have a regular range where the members 
can hold matches. However, the prevailing 
sentiment seems to be that you can not 
enjoy fire arms unless you are killing some- 
thing, so the prospect for organization is 
not the brightest. Still, we shall" keep on 
agitating the thing a while longer. If any 
of your readers in or near Chicago should 
be interested, I should like to hear from 
them. 

I buy your magazine regularly from my 
newsdealer and whenever opportunity offers 
am more than glad to give it a boost. Your 
pen of game hogs is certainly enough to 
make the four legged breed sick with envy 
at their capacity. 

R. D. Scott, Jr., Chicago, 111. 



ANSWERS TO HALE, POPE AND WHEELER. 
In May Recreation G. L. Hale states an 
experience with nitro powder, and asks for 
an explanation. Mr. Hale had no powder 
in the shell that missed fire. A friend of 
mine bought 100 U.M.C. shells, for a quail 
hunt, and had about a dozen act just as 
described by Mr. Hale. Investigation 
showed that there was no powder in them, 
and further investigation discovered un- 
used shells in the same condition. Mr. 
Hale should remember that the W.R.A. 
No. 4 primer is very powerful and is am- 
ply able to start the wads and straighten 
the crimp. He is doubtless positive that 
he put the powder in the shell ; but I am 
sure that if he will load a shell as he de- 
scribed but without any powder, and then 
try it, he will get a result that will convince 
him of the truth of my remarks. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



in 



Mr. E. F. Pope gives some good advice 
on cleaning rifles, but his method can be 
improved on. Almost every family has 
a fountain syringe. After using your rifle, 
and before running anything through the 
barrel, fill such a syringe with a hot 
solution of washing soda, insert the rub- 
ber tube, without any nozzle, in the 
breech of the piece, and let the hot soda 
solution run through the barrel and out 
of the muzzle. Then wipe as advised by 
Mr. Pope, until the cotton or cloth comes 
out perfectly clean. Then oil as described. 
The soda softens the powder residue, car- 
ries most of it away and neutralizes any 
acid. A wiper would have forced the res- 
idue into the rifle grooves and hardened 
some of it so that it would probably have 
remained even after the wipers appeared to 
come through clean. The method I have 
just described leaves the barrel hot. It 
therefore dries thoroughly and the oil or 
grease flows readily to every part of the 
rifling. 

Dr. A. C. Wheeler calls attention to the 
effect of altitude on the flight of bullets. 
He may be interested in the following from 
the Firing Regulations for Small Arms oi 
the Army : 

465. The resistance of the air to the 
flight of a projectile varies directly with its 
density; the density is dependent on the 
altitude above the sea and on the local 
changes in the barometric pressure, the tem- 
perature, and the degree of moisture. 

466. For every increase in height above 
the level of the sea, provided the temper- 
ature remains constant, the density of the 
air diminishes ; an increase in the range 
for any particular adjustment of the sights 
will therefore result. At 500 yards this 
increase is about 5 yards, at 800 yards about 
10 yards, and at 1,000 yards about 14 yards 
for each increase of 1,000 feet in elevation. 

R. R. Raymond, 
Captain, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army. 
Fort Leavenworth, Kans. 



WANTS TO "KEEP HIS REPEATER. 

I have been a reader of Recreation the 
past 6 years. I enjoy the gun and ammu- 
nition department most and always read it 
first. 

I notice you are waging a war 
against the use of automatic and pump 
guns. I use a pump and am not a hog 
because I use one. I was out 4 times last 
season with my beagle and was satisfied 
with a rabbit each time. I prefer the pump 
for several reasons. A double hammerless 
as effective and durable as a pump would 
cost double the price. I like the single 
barrel, and the pump places me on equal 
footing with the man who uses a double 
gun. 



The biggest hogs in our town use high 
grade double hammerless ejectors. They 
kill the limit every chance they get. They 
are also the ones who most emphatically 
denounce the pump gun. What will be 
gained by stopping the use of the pump 
while allowing the market hunters to 
slaughter game with the double gun? 

Looking through Recreation from 1898 
to date I find its game hog pictures show 
more than 2 double guns to one pump. 
Why should Lhe repeating shot gun be al- 
lowed and not the repeating rifle? The men 
who say a double gun is good enough for 
them, want nothing but the most deadly 
repeating rifle when they hunt big game. 

Prohibit the use of the automatic guns 
if it can be done before there are thou- 
sands of them made and sold ; but let the 
owners of repeaters use their favorite weap- 
on as long as hogs are allowed to use 
double ejectors. 

F. W. Kachelries, Shamokin, Pa. 



PROTESTS AGAINST THE AUTOMATIC. 

The placing of an automatic shot gun on 
the market is unwarranted, uncalled for, 
and a violation of divine, if not human, 
laws. Such a gun will increase the hunter's 
power to kill fourfold at least. He is now 
equipped with firearms which are as much 
of an improvement over the flintlock mus- 
kets of our forefathers as the modern ocean 
liner is better than the rude caravels of the 
14th century. Game is already becoming 
scarce and the increased destruction these 
guns will produce means that there will 
soon be no game of any consequence left 
to hunt. The automatic gun will rob hunt- 
ing of its most delightful attribute, strategy, 
and will reduce it to mere senseless and 
wholesale butchery. The Northern part of 
Wisconsin and Minnesota have long been 
and still are noted for deer, and thither flock 
hundreds of sportsmen, the city of St. Paul 
alone furnishing 212 on the opening day 
of the last hunting season. While we are 
increasing the killing power of guns we do 
not always stop to think that the game has 
not 'increased its power of propagation to a 
like extent. The game should be given at 
least a fighting chance for its life. 

No doubt the sales of such a gun will 
be such as to make it a paying investment 
for the makers, but there are other things 
in this world worth consideration beside the 
mighty dollar, and in the name of fairness 
and humanity I protest against the manu- 
facture and sale of such a weapon. I know 
that in this I voice the sentiments of every 
fair minded sportsman in the United States 
F. A. Marshall, Prescotr, Wis. 



Here is a copy of a bill that has been 
sent to all chief wardens of the League of 
American Sportsmen, for introduction in 



112 



RECREATION. 



their respective Legislatures. The appear- 
ance of the automatic shot gun on the mar- 
ket has made such legislation necessary in 
order to save the game birds from destruc- 
tion. Similar legislation is contemplated 
for British Columbia. The bill is entitled 
"An Act to Prohibit the Use of Repeating 
Shot Guns in Hunting Birds," and says : 

Section I. — It shall be unlawful to use, in 
hunting birds or animals of any kind, any 
shot gun holding more than 2 cartridges 
at one time, or that may be fired more than 
twice without re-loading. 

Section 2. — The intent and meaning of 
this bill is to prohibit the use of any so- 
called repeating shot gun or pump gun. 

Section 3. — Any person found guilty of 
a violation of this statute shall be fined 
not more than $50 nor less than $25 for each 
offence ; and the carrying of any such gun 
in the woods or in the fields or in any of 
the waters of this State shall be considered 
prima facie evidence of an attempt to vio- 
late Section 1 of this statute, and shall be 
punished as provided in this section. — The 
Daily World, Vancouver, B. C. 



Omaha, Neb. 
Winchester Repeating Arms Co. 

Dear Sirs : — I protest against your plac- 
ing an automatic shot gun on the market. 
I have used 4 of your guns, but if you 
put out an automatic gun I shall never 
buy or use another Winchester gun of 
any description. I am a hunter of many 
years' experience, but I am no game hog 
and consider an automatic gun a nuisance 
whose use should be prohibited by law. I 
have done considerable missionary work 
against such a weapon and shall continue 
to do so. 

The small remnant of game that still 
exists in the United States needs protec- 
tion; not an automatic gun. If its use 
were confined strictly to trap shooting, well 
and good, but we Americans know better 
than to listen to such foolishness. The 
market hunters would use it altogether. 

Hoping the automatic gun will die in its 
infancy, I remain yours truly 

L. E. Peters, 910 So. 16 St. 



SMALL SHOT. 

The Colt's Patent Fire Arms Co., in pre- 
senting their new "Officers' Model" revol- 
ver, have solved a problem of interest to 
many. The old model Colts .38 shot the 
long cartridge, inside lubricated, with a 
hollow base bullet, so devised that the pow- 
der gases caused the needed expansion of 
the projectile to fill the grooves properly. 
It was manifestly inexpedient to use a re- 
duced charge and a round ball for gallery 
practice, as round balls do not expand. 

The new arm has been correctly bored 
and will now take the gallery round bullet 



with reduced powder charge. At the same 
time, the full service charge may be used 
when desired. 

The use of charges as above noted elim- 
inates the confusion in ammunition that has 
existed hitherto between the Colt and the 
S. & W. military revolver. At the same 
time the sphere of usefulness in gallery 
practice has been enlarged. 

Ex-Ordnance Sergeant, Baltimore, Md. 



I advise Mr. Clincher to get an Ithaca, 
a gun that is cheap in price only. I have 
a 10^-pound, $6o-grade Ithaca, made to 
order in 1898. It cost me $34, and though 
it has been constantly used with maximum 
loads of dense nitro powders, it is as tight 
and perfect as when new. 

Few smokeless powders, and especially 
the bulk varieties, bear out the claims of 
their makers as regards smokelessness. I 
am told that in Northern climates, where 
there is always more or less breeze stirring, 
the smoke produced by them is nearly 
imperceptible. In the dense, breezeless 
jungles of the West Indies, Central and 
South America, they make smoke enough 
to obscure the view a full half minute. 
The exceptions I have found are Dupont, 
among bulk powders, and Grey Walsrode 
among dense powders. 

L. H. Higgins, 
Master S. S. Admiral Sampson. 



Last week I was honored by a visit from 
T. A. Divine, traveling agent of the Win- 
chester Arms Company. He advised me 
that if we would eliminate the clause in 
House Bill No. 18 that refers to pump and 
automatic guns, the bill would be rail- 
roaded through. He stated also that the 
Winchester people had written him asking 
him to join the L. A. S. 

Miles Carroll, Yazoo City, Miss. 

Only one construction can be put on this 
statement about "railroading" the bill 
through, anybody can guess what that is. — 
Editor. 



She — Is she a business woman? 
He— Yes. 

She — What business is she interested in? 
He — Everybody's. — Indianapolis Journal. 



"That punch bowl," said the West Balti- 
more hostess, "is genuine cut glass." 

"That's right," remarked her husband, 
"cut from $2 to $1.98."— Baltimore News. 



A tailor in Brooklyn has a sign in his 
window which says : 

"Pants, 50 sents a leg ; if you buy 2 legs, 
we throw in the seat." — Exchange. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. If ohotographed, it may still live 
and its educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



THIN OUT THE CROWS. 

I have read with deep interest Anson 
Howard's notes on the crow, which exactly 
coincide with my observations. For more 
than 30 years I have watched the crow, 
trying to learn whether he had any good 
traits worthy of mention, but aside from 
the few grasshoppers and grubs he eats he 
is a robber and a murderer of the worst 
type. 

During the month of May, on a cold 
morning, about 5 o'clock I saw a flock of 
birds, consisting of robins, blue jays, black 
birds and catbirds, in pursuit of a crow 
among some spruce trees. I got my gun 
but before I reached the place the crow had 
disappeared. It was easy to learn whose nest 
had suffered, for the feathers on a pair of 
black birds all stood the wrong way. I rea- 
soned that the crow had not had time to 
finish his robbery, but would soon return, 
so I waited a few minutes and sure enough 
he came and alighted on an apple tree to 
see if the coast was clear. But he had 
robbed his last bird's nest. When the gun 
cracked he folded his wings forever. 

The crow nearly always makes his visits 
for young birds and eggs early, before peo- 
ple are up. At such times he comes close 
to dwellings ; and poultry, eggs and young 
chickens suffer, while the crow is protected 
by law. He soon learns to keep away from 
a house where a gun is kept loaded for him. 

Many years ago I was returning from a 
fishing trip and my route led across a pas- 
ture in which was a band of sheep. Near 
the center of the field I found 2 lambs with 
both eyes pecked out. The lambs were still 
alive and were not more than a day old. 
I shall never forget this scene and have 
ever since deemed it a crime to get within 
gun shot of a crow when I had a gun in 
my hands without using it on the black 
murderer. 

The last nest of a prairie chicken I 
ever saw contained 14 eggs and all these 
hatched. On the day the chicks came out 
I saw a crow within a few feet of the old 
bird, which was covering the little birds. 
The mother flew at the crow, but he only 
retreated a few steps and returned to the 
attack. When he saw me he flew away. I 
was busy at the time and could not go for 
the gun. The next day no young birds 
could be found and none of these was ever 
seen again. I have never known of a 
prairie chicken nesting in that vicinity since. 

Mr. Howard is right in saying the birds 
the crows destroy would kill more insects 
than the crow does. 



Crows have increased in this State to 
such an extent that they outnumber the 
grouse at least 100 to 1, and if something 
is not soon done the prairie chicken will be 
extinct here. These birds are protected by 
law from, the white hunter till 1907 ; but 
this law only helps the crow in his dastard- 
ly work. 

Geo. O. Green, Princeton, 111. 

In referring the above to Mr. Hornaday, 
I wrote: 

I believe the time has come to declare 
war on the crow, not alone from what Mr. 
Green says, but from what many others 
have said through Recreation, during the 
past 10 years. The crow was no doubt cre- 
ated for seme good purpose, but it looks 
as if he had served his time and had 
now degenerated into an unmitigated 
poacher. As a boy I have put in many a 
day of hard work at planting corn where 
crows had pulled up the first sprouts, not- 
withstanding I had guarded the corn field 
carefully with a shot gun during the preced- 
ing weeks. I never cared so much for the 
crow's depredations on the corn, because 
it seemed a part of our farm life to hunt 
crows and replant ; but bird life has become 
too scarce to be further complacently sacri- 
ficed to this black marauder. Do you not 
agree with me? 

ANSWER. 

Beyond question, the crow deserves to be 
destroyed whenever and wherever he be- 
comes too numerous and too fresh. I 
would not countenance the wholesale de- 
struction of crows because of their depre- 
dations in the corn fields at planting time. 
At the same time, were I a farmer, I should 
use a shot gun as a discourager of crows 
so long as the corn was young enough to 
be uprooted by them. 

When crows begin to destroy game and 
song birds by wholesale, it is time to take 
the warpath against the black pest and to 
make them literally fly for their lives. Let 
us have in all States open seasons on crows, 
during the breeding season for other birds, 
and during that period make every crow 
afraid to look at a song or game bird, ex- 
cept as a creature to be avoided. 

When some crows nested in Beaver val- 
ley, in the Zoological Park, we received 
them hospitably, and fed them abundantly 
with corn and other good things ; but when 
one of them got gay and in one morning 
took 4 mallard ducklings from the pond, 
we shot him and felt no remorse of con- 
science afterward. 



"3 



H4 



RECREATION. 



If crows, or eagles, or hawks, or black- 
birds, or red squirrels become seriously 
destructive to song and game birds, or 
lambs, or poultry, it is fair and right to go 
after them with guns and reduce their 
numbers, just as we have done with the 
surplus of quarrelsome red squirrels in the 
Zoological Park. The time to do this 
is during the birds' breeding season; but 
do not attack any species in a savage spirit 
of extermination. Wild creatures generally 
are quick to learn when war is being waged 
against them ; and no bird is quicker to 
take a hint from a shot gun than a crow is. 
Thin out the murderers, whenever it be- 
comes necessary; but do not exterminate 
any wild species. 

W. T. Hornaday. 



A VALUABLE PUBLIC DOCUMENT. 

The Agriculture Department, at Wash- 
ington, has lately issued a bulletin entitled 
"The Economic Value of Bob White," 
which is one of the most interesting and 
valuable to sportsmen and farmers that has 
ever emanated from that office. The paper 
was prepared by Sylvester D. Judd, Ph.D., 
Assistant Ornithologist, Biological Sur- 
vey, and is a most complete and exhaustive 
treatise on the subject. Among the many 
important .facts set forth in this document 
are these : 

That the stomach of one quail examined 
contained 30 buttonwood seeds ; 

Another 300 smartweed seeds ; 

Another 500 seeds of sheep sorrel ; 

Another 700 seeds of the 3 sided mercury; 

That several stomachs were full of seeds 
of the rag weed; 

That one stomach contained over 1,000 
seeds of this weed ; 

Another 1,000 seeds of the crabgrass ; 

Another more than 3,000 seeds of various 
noxious weeds ; 

Another over 5,000 seeds of pigeon grass ; 

Another 10,000 seeds of the pig weed ; 

It is estimated that in Virginia there are 
4 quails to each square mile of land, or 
169,800 quails in the entire State. The crop 
of each of these birds will hold half an 
ounce of seed, and allowing 2 daily meals 
to each bird the total consumption of weed 
seeds by these birds in one season, amounts 
to 573 tons. 

We frequently hear it said that the quail 
is entirely a granivorous bird, that it does 
not eat insects at all ; yet this document 
shows conclusively that about 15 per cent, 
of the entire food of the quail, during the 
spring and summer months, consists of in- 
sects ; that 116 species of insects injurious 
to agriculture, are known to be eagerly 
sought after by the quail. Among these 
are the Colorado potato bug, the cucumber 
beetle, the bean leaf beetle, the squash lady- 
bird, the wire worm, the May beetle, vari- 



ous other species of beetles, including the 
Mexican cotton boll weevil ; also the cater- 
pillar, the army worm, the corn-louse ant, 
the cut worm, the grasshopper, the Rocky 
Mountain locust and the chinch bug. 

More than one dozen army worms have 
been taken from the stomach of a single 
bird and 30 Rocky Mountain locusts from 
another. 

Over 40 cotton boll weevils were taken 
from the stomach of one Bob White. 

This bug damaged the cotton crop in 
Texas last year to the amount of $15,000,- 
000. Think of the number of these destruc- 
tive insects that would have been consumed 
by the quails if they had been allowed to 
remain as numerous in that State as they 
were 10 or 20 years ago ! 

The potato beetle is known to have dam- 
aged the potato crop in the United States 
to the extent of more than $10,000,000 last 
year. If the quail had been properly pro- 
tected all or nearly all that loss would have 
been averted. 

The chinch bug and the Rocky Mountain 
locust are estimated to Jiave destroyed in a 
single year more than $100,000,000 worth 
of farm crops ; yet if the quail had been 
allowed to remain in its former abundance 
the greater part, if not all, of this loss 
would have been prevented. 

I have known farmers, who left their 
plows, reapers and mowing machines out- 
doors all winter, to complain of the des- 
truction of their grain by quails ; yet these 
same birds would have saved some of these 
individual farmers hundreds of dollars 
worth of grain if the birds had been prop- 
erly cared for. 

Every farmer and every sportsman in the 
United States should have a copy of this 
recent bulletin and can get it for the ask- 
ing. 



HOW TO TAN SKINS. 

Most sportsmen have use for leather in 
making jackets, cartridge bags, knife scab- 
bards, etc-, and those who live where there 
are woodchucks can catch and tan their own 
leather, which will be as soft as the best 
they can buy. I tanned a number of skins 
last spring and made some good shoestrings, 
watch chains, and other useful tricks. 

Here is the recipe: 

Put 4 quarts of air-slacked lime in 3 gal- 
lons of water put in the skin and let it re- 
main 26 hours, or until the fur slips off eas- 
ily. Then rinse well, stretch, and dry. Go 
to the woods, get a pail of hemlock bark, 
fill the pail with boiling water and let it 
remain 2 days. Then strain and add to the 
juice 3 ounces of alum, 3 ounces of salt- 
petre and stir. Put the skin in this and let 
it remain one week, or until it is as dark as 
you wish; then take it out and beat until 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



"5 



dry. This formula is good for any skin up 
to 12 by 24 inches. 

If you are not in a hurry you can take 
the hair off by putting the skin in a brook 
or stream of running water. If you use 
a pail have fresh water every 2 or 3 days. 
When skinning the animal be sure to get 
off all the meat and fat. The alum and 
saltpetre will cost 9 cents. Larger skins 
may be tanned in the same way, using in- 
creased quantities of each ingredient and a 
larger vessel. 

After being tanned the skin should be 
soft, smooth and firm. I made a pair of 
snowshoes of woodchuck skin, but did not 
tan the skins. 

Arnold N. Holmes, Greenland, N. H. 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 
A queer animal was recently caught by a 
neighbor of mine and I wish you would 
please tell me what it is. I might think 
that it was a pocket gopher only it has no 
pocket and it always eats its food as soon 
as it gets it. The animal is about 11 or 
12 inches long, the fur is almost exactly 
like a mole's, only it is grayish white under- 
neath. It has 4 teeth, 2 above and 2 below, 
the upper ones having a ridge in them mak- 
ing them look like 4 teeth. It has 5 large 
claws on the front feet, but the hind ones 
are short. The tail is about 4 inches long 
covered with a few short white hairs.^ The 
ears are not much more than holes in the 
side of the head, with no earlap or any cov- 
ering. The head is about like a muskrat's 
only the nose is larger and more blunt. 
There is scarcely any neck. This animal 
stands about 4 or 5 inches high. 

Roswell Puckett, Rock Rapids, la. 

ANSWER. 

It is probably a weasel, but it is impos- 
sible to say definitely from your description. 
Can any reader of Recreation make a bet- 
ter guess? — Editor. 



In reply to the question of Jean Allison, 
of Jerome, Ariz., in May Recreation, page 
367, I beg to say that in Wisconsin deer 
liver is not good to eat for the reason that 
it has bloodsuckers in it. 

Of course there are no bloodsuckers in 
fawns, but I have seen them in the liver of 
a deer that was only 2 years old. Blood- 
suckers will be found in the livers of deer 
that have to drink out of lakes and slug- 
gish rivers. 

As Mr. Allison says, deer liver may be 
good to eat in Arizona, as the streams 
there are all mountainous, therefore, they 
are swift, and the lakes, which are few, 
are well supplied with fresh water. 

The bloodsuckers found in deer livers 
are about 2 inches long and 24 °f an i ncn 



wide, when they are contracted. They are 
the regular lake bloodsucker. 

If any reader of Recreation wishes to 
see deer liver containing bloodsuckers I 
will try to send him a piece this fall if I 
can make my usual hunting trip. 

F. C. Dutton, Bloomer, Wis. 



The April number of your exceedingly 
popular magazine contains a question in 
regard to fish hawks. Two birds, only, 
constitute the family of a fish hawk. In 
this part of Long Island we can observe 
many of these birds, flying to the ocean in 
search of food. They do not, however, 
breed here, but on the shores of Gardiner's 
island, where in no case do we find 3 ma- 
ture birds occupying the same nest. 

It is interesting to watch the old birds 
guard their young, one staying home to 
protect and fondle the young, while the 
other is away to the ocean in seach of 
some unlucky fish. Two birds and 2 only 
are the parents of the young hawks, and 
one parent is always perched near the nest 
in an attitude of defiance. 

Your work in protecting our birds and 
fighting the uncivilized, barbarous game and 
fish hogs, is appreciated by all true sports- 
men. Keep it up. 

S. L. King, East Hampton, L. I. 



There is in this place a peculiar kind of 
owl, whose voice would frighten almost 
anyone. This bird has 6 to 8 young at a 
time. The oldest inhabitant around here 
tells me that the parent owl feeds 2 of the 
young exceptionally well and as a conse- 
quence those 2 grow with great rapidity. 
When they have attained a certain size the 
parent birds throw them out of the nest 
arid choose 2 others for special feeding; 
and so on until all are compelled to leave 
the parent nest. I suppose the old birds 
early discover the impossibility of feeding 
the whole family on full rations, and choose 
this somewhat original way in which to do 
their duty by their family. I do not per- 
sonally vouch for the truth of this state- 
ment but I find it generally believed. 

Dr. Chas. W. Hardman, Laton, Cal. 



Will you kindly tell me what is the 
greatest speed attained by wild geese in 
their flight? 

R. R. Heydenreich, Staunton, Va. 

Will some Recreation reader please an- 
swer ? — Editor. 



Will some reader of Recreation tell me 
where I can buy chipmunks? Should like 
to liberate a number on an island in which 
I am interested. 

Howard P. Beck, 135 Rouro, St., New- 
Port, R. I. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., 
New York. 

1st Vice-President, E. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 80 
West 40th St., New York. 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W. A. Rich- 
ards, General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington 
Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin 
Banking Co., 192 Broadway, New York. 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 
Anderson, A. A., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Beard, D. C, 204 Amity St., Flushing, L. I. 
Blackstone, Lorenzo, Norwich, Conn. 
Buzzacott, Francis F., Chicago, 111. 
Brown, J. Stanford, 489 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Butler, C. E., Jerome, Ariz. 
Carey, Hon. H. W., Eastlake, Mich. 
Carnegie, Andrew, 2d, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, George, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, Morris, Fernandina, Fla. 
Cor bin, Austin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
N. T. De Pauw, New Albany, Ind. 
Dickinson, E. H., Moosehead Lake, Me. 
Edgell, G. S., 192 Broadway, New York City. 
Ellis, W. D., 136 W. 72d St., New York City. 
Fearing, D. B., Newport, R. I. 
Ferry, C. H., 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Ferry, Mansfield, 183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Fraser, A. V., 478 Greenwich St., New York City. 
Gilbert, Clinton, 2 Wall St., New York City. 
Hudson, E. J., 33 E. 35th St., Bayonne, N. J. 
McClure, A. J., 158 State St., Albany, N. Y. 
Mershon, W. B., Saginaw, Mich. 
Miller, F. G., 108 Clinton St., Defiance, O. 
Morton, Hon. Levi P., 681 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Nesbitt, A. G., Maple St., Kingston, Pa. 
O'Conor, Col. J. C, 24 E. 33d St., New York 

City. 
Oliver, Rev. F. E., Winfield, Kans. 
Pierson, Gen. J. F., 20 W. 52d St., New York 

City. 
Prescott, A. L., 90 W. Broadway, New York City 
Rice, A. F., 155 Pennington Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
Rininger, Dr. E. M., 142 E. 27th St., New York 

City. 
Seton, E. T., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Seymour, J. H., 35 Wall St., New York City. 
Smith, E. B., Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, W. H., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Thompson, J. Walter, Times Bldg., New York 

City. 
Towne, E. S., Care of National Blank Book Co., 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Underwood, W. L., 52 Fulton St., Boston, Mass. 
Valentine, Dr. W. A., 5 W. 35th St., New York 

City. 
H. Williams, Box 156, Butte. Mont. 



per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought ' 
of them. In ordering please give L. A S. 
number : 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 
Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 

guns, rifles. 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 

goods. 
Blair C amera Co., Rochester, N. Y . P hotographic goods 
James Acheson, Talbot St.. St. Thomas, Ontario, 

Sporting goods. 



DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 



WASHINGTON DIVISION. 

I have the honor to report the following 
as part of the work that the League has ac- 
complished in this State during the past 
year: 

II arrests and convictions in Spokane 
county, viz : 

Westlake, cold storage, selling venison 
out of season, $25 and costs. 

Joe Reed, shooting ducks in close season, 
$15 and costs. 

Spokane Ditch Co., damming stream, $25. 

Finch, catching bass, $15 and costs. 

Joe Burdise, catching bass, $25 and costs. 

L. C. Gimmel, putting sawdust in stream, 
$100. 

Nick Eider, killing non-game birds, $15. 

Du Bois, shooting quail, $15. 

The foregoing is mainly the work of 
Member J. A. Uhlig, who is county game 
warden. 

I secured 3 arrests and convictions. One 
for shooting prairie chickens in close sea- 
son and 2 for shooting meadow larks. The 
2 latter got $15 each. 

It was the work of League members that 
secured the passage of several good laws, 
including a license law, the Audubon non- 
game bird law, prohibition of the sale of 
trout and game fishes, etc. 

An immense amount of letter writing has 
been done as to violators who could not be 
reached by law, and their promises secured 
in many cases that they will observe the law 
in future. 

Mr. F. A. Pontius, secretary-treasurer of 
this division, will give you information as 
to what has been accomplished in the West- 
ern part of the State. 

F. S. Merrill, 
Chief Warden, Washington Division. 

I herewith submit the following report 
of the work we have accomplished for 
game protection during the past year in 
the section West of the Cascade mountains; 

Through the efforts of the L. A. S. and 
its many friends in this State, the last Leg- 
islature revised and amended the game 
laws. As now enacted they are not so 
stringent in some respects as we wish to 
have them. We have, however, been able 



116 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



117 



to secure a conviction whenever we could 
obtain the necessary evidence. 

Mr. H. Rief, L. A. S. No. 9,151, our coun- 
ty game warden, also special deputy State 
game warden, reports as follows : 

Number of arrests during the year, 57. 

Number of convictions, 49. 

Number of dismissals and acquit- 
tals, 4. 

Number of forfeited bails, 2. 

Number of cases pending, 2. 

Amount of fines collected, ....$845.00. 

This includes only King county. 

The State Game and Fish Commissioner, 
Hon. T. R. .Kershaw, who is also a League 
member, "has given us all the assistance 
within his power. I am pleased to state that 
the game wardens in various sections are 
rendering us valuable assistance in the ap- 
prehension and conviction of violators of 
the game laws. 

Among the arrests and convictions we 
have secured, I mention only a few, as fol- 
lows : March 28, 1903, 5 Italians convicted 
of dynamiting trout in Cedar river ; fined 
$50 each. One paid his fine, the others 
going to jail. 

April 23, 1903, proprietors of 3 restaur- 
ants convicted and fined for having in their 
possession a large number of fresh water 
perch, it being against the law to sell game 
fishes at any time. 

May 5, 1903, Southern Mill Co. fined $100 
for dumping sawdust in Lake Washington. 
May 23, 1903, J. D. Hoover was arrested 
in the act of fishing with a Chinese sturgeon 
line, fined $25 and costs. This was a set 
line, about 300 feet long, with several hun- 
dred hooks attached. 

A man by the name of Orr was fined $25 
for trapping and having in his possession 
a number of grouse and quail. When War- 
den Rief made a search of the woods near 
his place he found 7 traps, 2 of which con- 
tained 10 grouse. He berated these and 
destroyed the traps. Several convictions 
were secured, of proprietors of restaurants 
for selling game. 

Several of the adjoining counties have 
also secured convictions of persons for kill- 
ing deer out of season. 

Our game warden is at present doing all 
he can to obtain evidence to convict elk 
tooth, hunters, who killed a number of elk 
on the Humptulips river, 22 miles above 
Humptulips City, in the Olympic Forest Re- 
serve. These elk, 8 in number, are now 
lying where they were killed, the teeth only 
having been taken. Th elk remaining in 
this State are principally to be found in the 
Olympic Forest Reserve. The League mem- 
bers in this district, and all other sportsmen, 
are strongly in favor of making the entire 
Forest Reserve a game preserve. 



While we have a number of forest rang- 
ers who are ex officio jgame wardens, we 
fail to find that they have ever made an ar- 
rest for violation of our game laws, on this 
Reserve. 

Our game warden has in his possession 3 
elk heads that were killed in the Olympic 
range by a wealthy hunter who came over 
from Wales, England. Our laws prohibit 
the killing of more than one bull elk in 
one season ; also prohibit the shipping of 
same out of the State. This man is making 
a fight to get possession of the heads, claim- 
ing they cost him over $1,000. This case is 
cited only as an instance of the game viola- 
tions on this Reserve. 

Our game warden has been making a hard 
fight against the custom of shipping in 
game from Alaska, on steamers landing at 
this port, Seattle. A number of seizures 
of game heads, hides and horns have been 
made. 

In this work Mr. Rief has co-operated 
with Dr. Palmer, of Washington, D. C. At 
first there was some opposition from the 
steamers which received shipments of game, 
hides, etc., but, on the matter being taken 
up with them by Dr. Palmer we have had 
little trouble. 

Frank A. Pontius, 
Sec.-Treas. Washington Division, 



GOOD WORK IN OKLAHOMA. 

L. H. Haskins, of Fort Sill, Oklahoma, wis 
recently arraigned in probate court on the charge 
of having placed dynamite in Cache creek and 
killed nearly 200 fish. Haskins pleaded guilty 
and was fined $50 and costs. 

Judge Hussey, in imposing the fine, said that 
the next guilty man brought before him on a 
similar charge would get the limit of the law as 
a fine. 

This conviction is one of a number secured by 
Mr. A. C. Cooper, of Fort Sill, game warden for 
the government and Rear Warden of the Fort 
Sill Chapter of the League of American Sports- 
men. Mr. Cooper has spent much time and money 
in searching for violators of the game and fish 
laws and in bringing them to justice. — Lawton, 
Oklahoma, paper. 

The mills of the gods grind slowly, but 
they grind exceeding fine. In this case 
Cooper is one of the gods. — Editor. 



Mother (severely) — How many straw- 
berries have you eaten out of this basket, 
Violet? 

Violet — Only 2. One to see how it tasted, 
and the other to take the taste out of my 
mouth. — Exchange. 



The Czar of Russia reviewed 50.000 
troops the other day. The dispatches say 
they presented a fine appearance. They had 
not met the Japs. — Chicago Record-Herald. 



FORESTRY. 



It takes 30 years to grow a tree and 30 minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



FORESTRY IN CONGRESS. 

Friends of forestry and of the forest re- 
serves are naturally chagrined at the inac- 
tion of Congress during its last session. So. 
much was promised and so much had been 
expected that the utter failure to do the 
vital thing was particularly disappointing. 
President Roosevelt was anxious that 
the administration of the forest reserves 
should be transferred from the land office 
to the U. S. Bureau of Forestry. He has 
urged the passage of such a measure in 
nearly all his messages, and it is known 
that the majority in Congress were really 
in favor of dong something, but everything 
was sacrificed for politics in the presiden- 
tial year. 

What Congress did for the forest in- 
terests of the country can be summarized 
in 2 words, it ducked. In addition to the 
usual lot of relatively unimportant bills 
affecting the forests of the country there 
were 3 before Congress that were of the 
first importance and in which the American 
Forestry Association, as an organization, 
was deeply interested. These were: 

The transfer of the administration of the 
federal forest reserves to the department 
of agriculture, in order to combine all gov- 
ernment forest work in the Bureau of 
Forestry, where it properly belongs ; the 
repeal of the notorious Timber and Stone 
act, which has been agitated for years ; and 
finally, a bill calling for an appropriation 
of $50,000 for the building of roads and 
trails in the federal forest reserves. 

The first 2 of these measures are fairly 
familiar to most people who follow gov- 
ernment matters, since they have been 
urged and agitated by various associations, 
including the American Forestry Associa- 
tion, for several years. The third was ta- 
ken up by the Hon. Edward A. Bowers, the 
able and energetic secretary of the asso- 
ciation, in compliance with a resolution 
passed by the association at its last an- 
nual meeting. This resolution called for 
an appropriation of $500,000 by Congress 
to be spent in the making of good roads and 
trails in the reserves. Such a move, it was 
felt, would result in immense improvement 
in the administration of the reserves and 
would also be of the greatest service in 
fighting forest fires. 

Mr. Bowers, however, suggested that 
Congress be asked for only $50,000 for this 
purpose, to be available during the coming 
fiscal year ; the idea being that Congress 
might not be willing to make such a large 
appropriation as the resolution called for, 
in a presidential year. 



Congress took no action on this matter, 
rlor on any of the others, beyond post- 
poning further consideration until some fu- 
ture time. It picked about the edges a 
little but accomplished nothing definite or 
satisfactory to those who interested them- 
selves in trying to push these measures to 
a successful issue. 



HOW TO GROW LOCUST TREES. 

I am a reader of Recreation and I write 
for the purpose of gaining information re- 
garding locust trees. 

I have 30 acres of land which I wish 
to utilize to good advantage. I have been 
considering the advisability of setting this 
land out to locusts. I have not been able 
to find out much about the growth of the 
tree. Should I start them from the seed or 
will they grow from cuttings? How fast 
will they grow ? Will they bear transplant- 
ing or would you advise planting on the 
soil on which you wish them to grow? 

I live in the grape section and the trees 
would probably be used for grape posts. 
How far apart would you advise setting 
the trees? If the trees should be grown 
from the seed can you tell me where I could 
get some seed? Any light you can throw on 
this subject will be gratefully received. 

Roy Cowden. 

Much depends on the nature and condi- 
tion of the ground you intend to plant. If 
it is cultivated ground you can put in your 
locust seed and care for their cultivation 
much as you would for corn or any farm 
produce. I should prepare the ground exact- 
ly as for corn and plant the seed in rows 4 
feet apart, putting 2 seeds every 3 feet in 
the row. If the soil is good and your seed 
is good, your trees will grow to a height 
of 18 inches to 2 feet the first year. I 
have seen one year old locust seedlings 4 
feet high. For this reason it is not econom- 
ical to grow them in nursery beds and trans- 
plant them the next year. They should 
produce 4 inch posts in 10 years on suita- 
ble soil. As your plantation matures you 
should gradually thin out the inferior trees 
for the benefit of the straighter and better 
specimens. By planting them close together 
they will clean themselves of lower branches 
naturally and develop longer and straighter 
poles. You can procure locust seed from 
any of the large nurserymen. 

Locust can also be grown from cuttings if 
the ground is not too dry or too poor, but 
seeding would be more advisable. — Editor. 



118 



FORESTRY. 



119 



SAVE THE SEQUOIAS. 

The life of man seems indeed but a tran- 
sient hour, hardly long enough "to look 
about us and to die," when we compare it 
with the existence of a tree. In compari- 
son to some of the Sequoias, Methuselah 
died in infancy. A United States senator 
has lately made public certain information 
received by him about the history stored 
away in the great trees of California. One 
of moderate size, 15 feet in diameter 5 feet 
from the ground, reveals the following ex- 
periences : In 271 B.C. it began its exist- 
ence. In 245 a.d., when it was 516 years of 
age, a forest fire burned on its trunk a scar 
3 feet in width. After 1,196 years of placid 
life, in another fire, in 1441 a.d., the tree, 
aged 1,712, received another injury. An- 
other scar followed in 1580, and was not 
covered with new tissue for 56 years. 
The worst attack of all was in 1797, when 
the tree, then 2,068 years of age, was at- 
tacked by a fire which left a scar 18 feet 
wide, reduced by 1890, in 103 years, to 14 
feet. These vast historic growths are be- 
ing subjected to the fate which threatens so 
many of our forests throughout the land — 
the sawmill and conversion into the fleeting 
materials of commerce. The tree of which 
we have spoken, after defying storm and 
fire for over 20 centuries, fell a victim to 
the desire for money about 3 years ago. 
Only 10 isolated groves of these trees re- 
main, and only one grove is protected by 
government ownership. The nation ought 
to own them all, and it is earnestly to be 
hoped that Congress will act favorably on 
the President's request to buy 2 more 
groves — a modest enough ambition. Some 
of these trees are twice the size of the one 
whose age has been ascertained, and must 
be some 50 centuries old now, with possible 
long lives ahead. If Congress fails to save 
these ancient monuments, and allows them 
to flit through paltry buildings to a speedy 
nothingness, it will have added one to its 
disgraceful failures, and omitted the op- 
portunity to add one to its acts of wisdom 
and utility. — Collier's Weekly. 



NEW METHOD OF GATHERING TURPEN- 
TINE. 

Dr. Charles H. Herty, an expert on the 
subject of forestry and an attache of the 
United States Bureau of Forestry, is the 
inventor of a new method of gathering tur- 
pentine which will revolutionize the meth- 
ods now in vogue, and be the means of 
saving an immense amount of money to the 
South, where the turpentine industry 
thrives. Heretofore the crude turpentine 
has been gathered by cutting a kind of box 
or pocket in the base of the tree, and into 
this the product found its way from the 
scarified sides of the tree. The method 



was not only wasteful, but damaged the 
tree to such an extent that its life of use- 
fulness was considerably shortened. It is 
said that 2,000,000 acres of virgin forest 
are boxed annually in this way. Dr. Herty 
is a Southerner, and foreseeing the eventual 
ruin of a great industry, set about to arrive 
at some other means of extracting the 
resin. This he has succeeded in doing in a 
manner which meets all the demands of the 
case and increases the production about 75 
per cent, by the recovery of that which was 
formerly wasted and the improved quality 
of that gathered. The apparatus made use 
of by Dr. Herty is simple and inexpensive, 
consisting of an earthenware cup with a 
nail hole near the top, a 6 penny wire nail 
to hold it in place, and a pair of galvanized 
iron troughs to divert the flow of resin into 
the cup. Dr. Herty has not attempted to 
enrich himself by a monopoly of what is 
a patentable article, but has announced that 
the use of the process is public property. 
As the turpentine industry of the South is 
an extremely important one, his gift repre- 
sents a money valuation of considerable 
size. — Scientific American. 



PISCATOR AND PISCATRIX. 

FREDERIC BIGELOW. 

A nut-brown maid through field and wood 
Trips gaily with her line and hook ; 
Beside her, strides, in merry mood, 
A youth with rod and book. 

At length they come to a spreading tree, 
Beside whose roo'ts there brawls a brook; 
He casts his line far out and free, 
She drops her line and hook. 

What care has she for line and hook? 
She angles in her lover's eyes ; 
With many a smile and rapturous look, 
Expectant of her prize. 

He has a strike, his rod is bent, 
The gleaming sides of a trout they see ! 
There is a rush, the line is sent 
Around the roots of the old tree. 

Untangled is the silken line, 

A^ noble battle bravely fought 

For life and freedom ! But this time 

The wary trout is caught ! 

To her he proudly gives the trout 
Which wriggles from her little hands ; 
There is a scream and then a pout, 
The youth — she gently lands. 



First Mosquito — What ! Are you trying a 
black baby? 

Second Mosquito — Yes, I'm in mourning. 
—Life. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph..D. 
Author of "On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," "Fish as Food," etc. 

"What a Man Eats He Is." 



DATES AND DATE GROWING. 
The United States Department of Agri- 
culture has for a number of years been in- 
terested in introducing the date palm into 
the United States, and has recently pub- 
lished a bulletin by David G. Fairchild 
dealing with Persian gulf dates, which re- 
cords information gathered during an ex- 
tended journey through the date-growing 
regions of the East. 

The valley of the Euphrates is said to be 
the birthplace of the date palm. Whether 
this is true or not, it is certain that no- 
where else in the world are more favorable 
conditions for the cultivation of the date 
to be found than along the shores of the 
Persian gulf and in Lower Mesopotamia. 
According to Mr. Fairchild, "the Persian 
gulf date region is doubtless the largest in 
the world and furnishes the greatest part 
of all the dates sold in the American mar- 
kets. Two million cases, or over ioo mil- 
lion pounds of dates, have been exported 
in a single year from the principal ship- 
ping port ; and at a moderate estimate there 
must be not less than 15 to 20 million date 
palms in this great territory. This strip of 
forest varies in width from less than a 
mile to over 3 miles, and more than 5,000,- 
000 trees, it is estimated, are packed into it. 
There is certainly nothing comparable to 
it in the world, either as regards size or 
the ease with which it can be irrigated. 

"Date growing in Arizona is rapidly 
passing the experimental stage. The fact 
that this fruit could be grown there, how- 
ever, was first called to the attention of 
the public by the success of a number of 
chance seedlings which bore good crops of 
fine fruit. The seeds from which these 
seedlings were raised came probably from 
Persian gulf dates, since these are the most 
common ones in our markets. The excel- 
lence of the fruit from these seedlings and 
the fact that they ripened early made it 
seem probable that the Persian gulf dates, 
as a class, might prove on investigation to 
ripen earlier than those of North Africa, 
and therefore be better suited to the short, 
hot seasons in Arizona. 

"Packing dates for shipment is an impor- 
tant branch of the date industry. Scarcely 
any of the packing firms own date planta- 
tions but obtain their dates from the Arab 
land-owners through trusted Arab buyers. 
Some of these buyers who have been in the 
business many years are intrusted with 
iio,ooo to £20,000 in cash at a time, with 
which they buy the tons of dates that are 



necessary to supply the packing sheds. As 
in most businesses of this kind, there are 
risks to be taken, for the packer must buy 
in August and sell in November, during 
which time the price may have fluctuated 
considerably. It requires good judgment to 
decide how much to pay in August for No- 
vember delivery. The New York ship- 
ments to be most profitable must be in be- 
fore Thanksgiving day, and when this 
comes unusually early in the month, the 
packers have their hands full to get their 
shipments through in time." 

Judging from Mr. Fairchild's account, 
improvements in the methods of packing 
are to be desired. "Dates are no doubt one 
of the stickiest and most difficult fruits in 
the world to keep clean, and the Persian 
gulf varieties are particularly hard to pack 
in an attractive shape ; nevertheless, the 
stories one hears in the region, of the con- 
ditions in the packing sheds and the per- 
sonal uncleanliness of the men, women, and 
children who put up the dates, are enough 
to disgust a sensitive person and to prevent 
his ever eating packed dates again without 
having them washed. No old inhabitant 
thinks of eating a date without first thor- 
oughly washing it in a glass of water, un- 
less the cook has prepared it beforehand, 
and the sale of dates in America might fall 
off decidedly were it generally known how 
intimately the unwashed hands, bodies, and 
teeth of the notably filthy Arabs often come 
in contact with the dates which are sold 
by every confectioner." 

The following statements regarding the 
date as a food product occur : "The doc- 
tors seem agreed that sweet things in ex- 
cess are injurious to the digestion, and the 
dentists claim that sugar ferments between 
the teeth, forming lactic acid which attacks 
the dentine; but for all this, it is doubtful 
if there can be found a sounder, stronger 
race, with better digestion and finer, whiter 
teeth than the date-eating Arabs. The 
town Arabs and the Arabs of the seacoast 
eat quantities of dried fish and other sea 
animals, but the denizens of the Arabian 
desert live almost exclusively on dates and 
bread, with occasional feasts of sheep, goat, 
or chicken. Travelers across those deserts 
report that 3 pounds of dates and a few 
thin loaves of hard wheat bread a day will 
keep an Arab in good health for years. 
The quantity of these packed dates that a 
healthy Arab can consume at a sitting is 
astonishing. Two pounds would not be 
much more than an ordinary meal. The re- 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



121 



markable physique of the Arabs and their 
resistance to the almost unbearable heat of 
their country might be attributed, in part 
at least, to the nature of their simple food. 
At any rate, a thorough investigation of 
the food value of the date and its adapta- 
bility to the formation of foods for our hot 
summer season should be made, and pos- 
sibly this wonderful vegetable product, 
which is now used in America only as a 
second-class confection, might be utilized 
as a basis of a nutritious new food. Such 
investigations will never be made in that 
part of the world where the dates are 
grown, but must be undertaken by some 
country like America, which is interested 
in increasing the number of its food prod- 
ucts." 

OLD DAYS IN A WESSEX VILLAGE. 
A writer in a recent English review 
gives an interesting account of life in the 
early days in a West of England village. 
Of culinary matters he says : "I do not 
think that Wessex breeds cooks easily. 
Those of us who are not too Keltic are at 
any rate too Saxon to achieve kickshaws. 
The fine art of cooking comes by nature, 
and, in Western Europe at least, is mon- 
opolized by the Latin peoples. What we 
had of food we had in plenty, and, al- 
though distress spread wide, and quickly 
became acute when harvest failed, as a 
general rule even the poorest in our West 
country had enough to eat. Beef, mutton, 
pork, fish, we had abundantly, for Wessex 
lies between 2 seas, and we are a seafar- 
ing people. These, with cabbage and bread, 
formed the staple of the prospering poor, 
while the more fortunate added venison, 
capons, chickens, and wild fowl to this diet. 
For the last 200 years, a loin of mutton 
stewed and served in a thick broth has 
been a favorite West country dish. I am 
afraid we habitually overate and overdrank 
but we loved plenty and our hands were 
open. When some Wessex lord kept high 
festival, the scene was Gargantuan. At a 
great junketing which was held 150 years 
ago at Ford House, not far from here, this 
was the provision for the guests : 140 part- 
ridges, 71 turkeys, 112 chickens, 258 larks, 
3 deer, 6 oxen, 5 sheep, and '2^ calves.' 
This feast was as remarkable for the va- 
riety as for the abundance of the proven- 
der. In addition to the foregoing, there 
were also cooked and eaten mallards, plo- 
vers, sea larks, pea hens, gulls and curlews. 
Shell fish was much accounted of in those 
days, for our neighboring borough provid- 
ed for the judges, as they passed through 
on circuit, what they then called 'a treat,' 
one which surely must have been remem- 
bered, seeing that it consisted of 30 lob- 
sters, as many crabs, 100 scallops, 300 oys- 
ters and 50 oranges. 



"The men of Wessex have long been cred- 
ited with a particular capacity for liquor, 
which, with the mead they still drink in 
some of our villages, they inherit from the 
earliest wassailing times. Of all drinks, of 
course the cheapest and most plentiful were 
cider and beer. Then came ale, not the 
mild dinner beverage of today, but strong 
old beer, which was drunk out of long 
wineglasses. We did not traffic much in 
wine, though canary, malaga, claret and 
sack had each their vogue and were not 
expensive. In the days of our grandfath- 
ers' great grandfathers canary was 2 shill- 
ings and claret a shilling a quart, and at 
any entertainment the cost of wine bore a 
proportion to the whole bill very different 
from what it bears now. Sherry, by the 
way, was scarcely known with us till the 
middle of the 18th century, and just before 
then, too, punch begins to figure in the old 
bills." 



MINCE PIE. 
I love to sit and think a while 

And smile ! 
I love to sit and think a while, 
A while the waiter up the aisle 
Between the rows of tables neat, 
Brings me the jumbled gob of sweet 

Mince pie ! 

Oh, my ! 

I love to grab the sprinkler in 

My fin: 
I love to grab the sprinkler in 
My shaking hand and then begin 
To gently lift the pie's hot edge 
And pulverized in rapture wedge 

In my 

Mince pie ! 

And then I love to take my ease 

And freeze, 
And then I love to take my ease 
And freeze to it and rub my knees 
With t'other hand in sweet content, 
All raptures of the joy gods blent 

In me ! 

Oh, gee ! 

I love to taste the toothsome dish 

And wish 
That I might taste the toothsome dish 
Till elephants all turn to fish 
And maidens never long to wed ! 
No other bliss may serve instead 

Of my 

Mince pie ! 

And then, when everything is done, 

And none, 
And then, when everything is done, 
And none is left where I'd begun, 
I love to feel my proud soul soar 
As eagerly I order more 

Mince pie : 

Oh, my ! — Unidentified. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



STORIES OF BIRD LIFE. 

Professor T. G. Pearson, of Greensboro, 
North Carolina, has written one of the most 
interesting and fascinating bird books that 
has ever come to my desk. It almost makes 
one weary to think of the hundreds of 
writers who are working the birds and the 
wild animals for revenue only. Few of 
the writers have any real love for or per- 
sonal interest in these creatures ; the others 
simply strive to turn them to financial ac- 
count. Mr. Pearson's book is different. It 
is plain to see that he follows and studies 
the birds from pure love of them, and be- 
cause he wants other people to know and 
love them. His book is not one of the dry, 
scientific kind. It is made up of a series 
of breezy, chatty talks about birds. It reads 
as his talks would sound if you were sitting 
next to him. He comes from the woods 
or fields and tells you all about what he has 
seen there, and he has learned so much of 
them that he apparently is at a loss to know 
what to say first or where to stop. Yet 
there is not a word in this whole book that 
you would cut out. On the contrary you 
wish, after he has finished talking of any 
one of the birds, that he would go on and 
on, for hours at a time. 

His book is intended mainly for children, 
but a man or a woman 70 years old will feel 
reluctant to lay it down until the last page 
has been read. 

"Stories of Bird Life" should be in the 
hands of every man, woman and child in 
the land, and I earnestly hope hundreds of 
thousands of copies of it may be sold in the 
next 2 years. 

The book is printed by the B. F. John- 
son Publishing Co., Richmond, Va., and 
sells at 60 cents. In ordering please mention 
Recreation. 

BUSINESS AND ROMANCE. 

A story of the experiences of 2 young 
business women in New York, by Harriet 
C. Cullaton, bears the semi-explanatory ti- 
tle, "Firm of Nan & Sue, Stenographers." 
On a thread of romance Mrs. Cullaton has 
strung actual incidents in the daily life of 
2 stenographers who have a miscellaneous 
assortment of patrons. No one has a bet- 
ter opportunity to learn the real nature 
and all the affairs of a man than the sten- 
ographer who writes his letters and other 
business papers. Secrets that a man will 
hide carefully from the wife of his bosom 
and from his male associates he will reveal 
to a stenographer, sometimes from neces- 
sity, in dictating a letter, sometimes inad- 
vertently, but often merely in a spontan- 
eous and inexplicable burst of confidence. 
Mrs. Cullaton has taken a shrewd, humor- 



ous, philosophical view of the vagaries of 
the genus dictator, and every stenographer 
will recognize him. It will also interest 
the dictator to see the mirror held up to 
himself by a not unkindly hand. Steno- 
graphers can get some mighty good, prac- 
tical suggestions from Nan and Sue, and 
no one will begrudge the 2 girls the happy 
outcome of their business experiences. 

"Firm of Nan & Sue, Stenographers,'' is 
brought out by the Broadway Publishing 
Company, New York, and the price is $1. 



DR. SENN'S NEW BOOK. 

Dr. Nicholas Senn, of Chicago, has writ- 
ten a book entitled "Our National Recrea- 
tion Parks," which has been published by 
W. B. Conkey Co., of Hammond, 111. 

Dr. Senn is well known as an enthusias- 
tic lover of nature, as an extensive traveler 
and as one of the greatest surgeons in the 
world. President McKinley appointed him 
Chief of the Operating Staff of Surgeons 
of the U. S. Army during the Spanish War. 
Dr. Senn also holds the rank of Surgeon 
General of the Illinois National Guard and 
at this writing is with the Field Hospital 
Service of the Japanese Army. 

Dr. Senn is a trained observer and has 
made a close study of the Yellowstone Na- 
tional Park, the Yosemite National Park, 
and the Sequoia Groves of the Sierras. He 
wields a graceful and facile pen and por- 
trays what he sees so vividly and forcibly 
that the reader may see it almost without 
the aid of other than the pen pictures. Not- 
withstanding this the book is profusely il- 
lustrated with half tone reproductions of 
photographs, and must prove a most de- 
lightful piece of reading, either for vacation 
days or for the long winter evenings. 

The book sells at $1. 



A book of short stories' by Jack London 
bears the title of one of them, "The Faith 
of Men." For fire and originality the au- 
thor of "The Call of the Wild" is unmatched 
among fiction writers of the hour, and his 
many admirers will enjoy these masterly 
tales of the ever new Northwest. 

"The Faith of Men" is published by The 
Macmillan Company, New York and Lon- 
don, and the price is $1.50. 



"Brave Hearts" is the title of a series of 
thrilling stories of the race track, written 
by W. A. Fraser and published by Charles 
Scribner's Sons. 

Mr. Fraser is well known as a vigorous 
and forceful writer and all horsemen and 
lovers of the sport of racing will find ab- 
sorbing interest in the pages of this book. 
Price, $1.50 net. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



AN IDEAL VACATION. 

Eaton Brothers, Wolf, Sheridan county, 
Wyoming, have established what they term 
a Vacation Ranch and have provided a 
complete supply of horses, pack outfits, 
tents and other camping accessories for the 
purpose of showing Eastern people the high 
places and special shady canyons of the 
Rocky mountains. A part of the plan will 
be to take parties on camping trips to and 
through the Yellowstone Park. 

Howard Eaton is well known to many 
readers of Recreation as an old time stock- 
man and as a contributor to this magazine 
and I cheerfully recommend him as a 
man thoroughly capable of giving any vis- 
itor an ideal recreation tour. I first met 
Howard when he was camping in a little 
shack in the Bad Lands on the Little Mis- 
souri in 1879 and he has been hanging out 
in the wild and woolly country ever since. 
He probably knows Montana, Wyoming, 
Idaho and the Yellowstone Park as well as 
any man in that country.- He is thoroughly 
honest and reliable in every way and knows 
how to get all the fun out of a rough and 
tumble trip that is possible. He knows 
where to find the game and the good fish- 
ing waters. If you contemplate a trip in 
the West at any future time you should 
certainly communicate with Mr. Eaton and 
should read the beautiful book he has is- 
sued entitled "An Ideal Summer Resort in 
the Far West." In writing please mention 
Recreation. 

WHERE TO PUT YOUR MONEY 

Nearly all careful business men realize 
the value of life insurance, not only as a 
provision for their families in case of 
death, but as a safe and profitable business 
investment. It is not, therefore, necessary 
to advise readers of Recreation as to th<? 
wisdom or the necessity of carrying life in- 
surance ; but I do earnestly advise all read- 
ers of this magazine to communicate with 
the Equitable Life Insurance Co., 120 
Broadway, New York. 

This is one of the oldest, wealthiest 
and most thoroughly reliable companies in 
the world. There are few people in this 
country who have not seen one or more of 
the massive business blocks which this 
company has erected in the various leading 
cities, and these alone furnish substantial 
evidence as to the permanency and the re- 
liability of this great corporation. 

If you are not carrying as much life in- 
surance as you should cut off the coupon 
from the Equitable ad, printed on page 129 
of this issue of Recreation, fill it out and 
send it in. If you will do this you will get 



some facts and figures by return mail which 
will interest you. 

NEW PATENTS. 

Patent No. 759,415 has been issued to 
George C. Bourne, Worcester, Mass., for 
an improvement on pistol . and revolver 
butts. The device consists of a ring at the 
lower end of the butt in which the little 
finger is to be inserted, and of notches or 
cells in which the second and third fingers 
are to be inserted. 

Patent No. 744,364 has been issued to. J. 
E. Krewson, St. Louis, Mo., for a device 
for decappmg and loading cartridges. 

Patent No. 744,454 has been issued to 
Oscar Allen, Lincoln, 111., on a fishing reel. 

Patent No. 744,462 has been issued to A. 
W. Bishop, Racine, Wis., for a fishing hook 
shield. 

Patent No. 744,651 has been issued to V. 
P. Vickery, Bradley, 111., for a front sight 
for shot guns. 

Full particulars regarding any of these 
patents can be obtained by addressing the 
Patent Office, Washington, D. C. 



A NEW STEAMER LINE. 

The Dominion and Atlantic Railway has 
established a steamer line between New 
York, Yarmouth and Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
The boats on this line will sail from the 
Munson pier, foot of Wall street, at 11 
a. m., every Saturday, reaching Yarmouth 
the following Monday morning. The boat 
remains there during the day, leaves in the 
evening and arrives at Halifax Tuesday 
morning. The round trip occupies 6 days 
and the ticket, including meals and berth, 
costs only $32. 

One of the steamers to run on this line 
is the Prince Arthur, one of the most sub- 
stantial, commodious and comfortable coast 
liners that enters this port. This is the 
boat that recently beat the Monmouth, of 
the Jersey Central Line, on a hot race from 
the Narrows to Sandy Hook. 

Further information regarding this new 
line may be had by addressing the Munson 
Line, Pier 14, East River, New York City. 
When writing please mention Recreation. 



The U. S. Marine Corps has placed an 
additional order with the Ideal Mfg. Co., 
New Haven, Conn., for another quantity of 
complete outfits with which to equip the 
various Marine Corps stations, each set 
consisting of an Ideal Loading Press with 
appurtenances, Universal Powder Measure 
No. 5, Armory Mould, bullet Lubricator and 
Sizer, lubrication, etc., all of which are to 
be used in reloading the .30-40 Krag ser- 



123 



124 



RECREATION. 



vice shell with the Ideal bullet No. 308245 
and a charge of 3 grains of smokeless 
powder. 

Reloaded ammunition of this description 
is said to be extremely accurate and is 
cheap, showing a great saving over the cost 
of new cartridges, which fact the militia of 
the various States as well as Uncle Sam are 
not slow to recognize. The use of reloaded 
ammunition for all ranges up to and in un- 
der 500 yards greatly reduces the cost of 
practice. 

The Weedless Hook, made by the West 
Weedless Hook Co., 12 Pearl street, Coun- 
cil Bluffs, Iowa, is fitted with a light wire 
guard which is attached by one end to the 
shank of the hook, having a loop on the 
other end which rests on the point of the 
hook in such a way as to throw off weeds 
or grass which would otherwise be caught 
by the hook. 

I have not had an opportunity to test one 
of these hooks, but it looks practical and is 
certainly worth a trial at the hands of any 
angler. 

The hook is made in a variety of sizes and 
is adapted to the use of minnows, frogs, or 
cut bait. It would be well for anglers to 
write the makers of this hook for a des- 
criptive circular. When you do so please 
mention Recreation. 



The picture sells at $3. In writing for 
it please mention Recreation. 



A. M. Cleland, G. P. A. of the Northern 
Pacific Railway, has issued a new and beau- 
tiful folder describing and illustrating the 
/Yellowstone Nadonal Park. It contains 
full information as to the various routes 
through, and the attractions in the Park, 
and many of the latter are illustrated with 
fine half tone cuts, printed in tints. There 
are also complete maps of the entire North- 
ern Pacific Territory and of the Park itself. 
The latter is in relief and shows every 
brook and every landmark of any impor- 
tance in the Park. 

Every person who has ever seen the 
Park or who hopes to see it in future 
should have a copy of this folder. In 
writing for it please mention Recreation. 



J. A. Lowell & Co., 147 Franklin street, 
Boston, Mass., have made a steel engraving 
from John Marshall's painting of the cup 
defender Reliance, which must appeal with 
especial force to all yachtsmen. It is a 
real pleasure to see after so many years, 
so fine a specimen of the almost lost art 
of steel engraving, and it would be difficult 
to find a subject on which the engraver's 
art could be employed to greater advantage 
than on this picture of the cup defender. 

The engraving is 27 x 34 inches in size, 
and will constitute one of the most inter- 
esting illustrations yet produced of the 
sport of yachting. 



B. Koenig, 875 Broad Street, Newark, N. 
J., is issuing a little pamphlet entitled 
"Shots" which contains many valuable hints 
and suggestions for sportsmen. The June 
number of this booklet is devoted to the 
use of the camera and contains an impor- 
tant announcement regarding a free trip 
to the World's Fair, which Mr. Koenig 
offers his customers on certain conditions 
described therein. 

Every amateur photographer in the coun- 
try should write Mr. Koenig for particulars 
of this offer and every sportsman should be 
on Mr. Koenig's mailing list for future is- 
sues of the pamphlet. It is sent gratuitous- 
ly. In writing for it please mention Rec- 
reation. _____ 

Every man who goes into the woods in 
summer, for any purpose, should provide 
himself with some effective remedy for mos- 
quitoes, flies and gnats. There are many 
preparations on the market for this pur- 
pose, but only a few of them are durable 
and reliable. Presto, which is advertised in 
Recreation, is pronounced by many, who 
have tested it, the best remedy yet offered 
to sportsmen. A sample package costs only 
25 cents and it is certainly worth that much 
to know of a good sure dope that will keep 
the insects off. Presto is made by the Pres- 
to Mfg. Co., Ossining, N. Y. When you 
write please mention Recreation. 



F. I. Whitney, G. P. A., G. N. Railway, 
St. Paul, Minn., has issued the 7th an- 
nual edition of his book entitled "Shooting 
and Fishing on the Line of the Great 
Northern Railway." The book is full of 
valuable information, interesting pictures 
and has a large map of the Northwestern 
hunting and fishing grounds. It would be 
well to have a copy at hand for reference. 
In asking for it, please mention Recreation. 



On June 1st at Square Lake, Aroostook 
county, Maine, on the line of the Bangor 
& Aroostook R. R., 2 square tail trout were 
caught, weighing 7 and 9H pounds respec- 
tively. The larger fish was caught by a wo- 
man. The fishing at Square Lake this sea- 
son has been exceptionally good, and the 
lake has become a popular resort for 
sportsmen. The catch above mentioned cer- 
tainly will not detract from its popularity. 



Upper Troy, N. Y. 
E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Texas. 

Dear Sir : — The pair of flying squirrels 
given to me as a premium arrived in good 
condition and I am pleased to say they are 
entirely satisfactory. Please accept my 
thanks. Yours truly, John Rasmussen. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



THE AWAKENING OF THE SOUTH. 

In May last I was invited to Louisiana to 
address the Legislature of that State, and 
several meetings of sportsmen in various 
towns, on the subject of game protection. 
A few of the thoughtful, progressive sports- 
men and naturalists of that State have be- 
come thoroughly aroused as to the neces- 
sity of a good, stringent game law, and 
naturally these men applied to the League 
and to its official organ for help in this 
direction. 

On visiting and ' conferring with these 
gentlemen I was especially gratified to learn 
that they had finally succeeded in arousing 
deep interest in the subject throughout the 
entire State. A bill for the protection of 
song, insectivorous and game birds had 
been drafted and a meeting of sportsmen 
was held in New Orleans on the night of 
my arrival, which was largely attended, and 
at which this bill was read and carefully 
considered. Several important sections were 
added to it and at this writing the meas- 
ure is before the Legislature, with a good 
prospect of its passage. 

The New Orleans newspapers have taken 
up the matter in earnest and are giving 
a great deal of space to it. I had invita- 
tions from a dozen towns to visit them and 
address the people on the importance of this 
movement; but for want of time could res- 
pond to only a few of them. Wherever 
I went I found earnest men who have de- 
termined that the wholesale destruction of 
bird life, which has been going on so reck- 
lessly in the South, must stop. It is esti- 
mated that over 250,000 ducks, 30,000 gulls 
and 10,000 mocking birds were shipped out 
of Louisiana last year, to say nothing of 
the thousands of other species that were 
marketed in order that a few men might 
line their pockets. 

The sportsmen and naturalists of that 
State are thoroughly indignant at the action 
of these market hunters and trappers, and 
the bill now pending before the Legislature 
prohibits the export of any and all kinds of 
game and of song and insectivorous birds, 
beyond the limits of the State. I, of course, 
advised the insertion of a section in the bill 
prohibiting the sale of game at home, but 
while the sportsmen all agreed with me 
that this should be done, they realized that 
the time had not yet arrived when such a 
measure could be enacted. They all saw, 
however, that in view of the rapid changing 
of public sentiment in favor of the preser- 
vation of bird life, they would be able within 
a few years to add this important clause to 
their law. 

The membership of the League is grow- 



ing rapidly in that State. The New Or- 
leans Game Protective Association, with 
160 members, has voted to merge itself 
into the League and abandon its old organi- 
zation. 

Over 100 League members have been en- 
rolled at Monroe and a local chapter or- 
ganized there. The Louisiana division has 
also been organized and the headquarters 
established at Monroe, with Dr. R. W. 
Faulk as Chief Warden and A. J. Renaud 
as Secretary-Treasurer. 

Delegations from various towns in the 
State called on me wherever I went and 
assured me that they would organize local 
chapters of the League in their respective 
towns as fast as possible. 

Evidently the days of the market hunt- 
er, the bird trapper and the plume hunter 
are numbered, as far as Louisiana is con- 
cerned. 

Now if the sportsmen and naturalists of 
Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and 
other Southern States will follow the ex- 
ample of Louisiana the bird life of the 
entire country can be saved from destruc- 
tion. 



LAW BREAKERS CONVICTED. 

The New Hampshire Fish and Game 
Commission is making lots of trouble for 
lawbreakers in that State. Here is a list 
of the prosecutions, recently issued by Com- 
missioner Merrill Shurtleff, of that State : 

Peter Auger, killing deer ; 6 months, $50. 

C. E. Barton, Berlin, catching trout ; $10. 

Irving Blake, Berlin, catching trout; $ip. 

W. L. Evans, Berlin, catching trout; 60 
days. 

Augustus Evans, Berlin, catching trout; 
60 days. 

Joseph Tabousac, Berlin, catching trout; 
60 days. 

Walter Simonds, Randolph, killing deer; 
6 months, $50. 

Joseph Astle, Groveton, catching trout ; 
60 days, $10. 

F. B. Hayes, Groveton, catching trout; 
60 days, $10. 

Joseph Corum, Stark, using gill net; 60 
days, $10. 

Christopher Corum, Stark, using troll ; 
60 days, $10. 

N. A. Tibado, Albany, killing deer; one 
year, $300. 

George Tibado, Albany, killing deer ; one 
year, $300. 

Joseph Tibado, Albany, killing deer; one 
year, $300. 

Timothy Chauncey, Albany, killing deer; 
6 months. 



12$ 



126 



RECREATION. 



J. A. Towie, Jackson, killing deer; bound 
over. 

B. M. Fernald, Jackson, catching trout; 
60 days, $25. 

W. G. Loud, Conway, shooting raccoon; 
60 days, $10. 

Leslie Merrow, Conway, killing deer; 
bound over. 

Leavitt Hale, Albany, killing deer; 6 
months, $100. 

Colby Chase, Albany, killing deer; 6 
months, $100. 

Albert Johnson, Albany, killing deer; 6 
months, $100. 

Frank Mansfield. Conway, hunting deer; 
6 months, $25. 

James Reynolds, Colebrook, killing deer; 
6 months, $100. 

Two Italians, Berlin, shooting robins; 6 
months $10. 

W. Hardy Whitefield, shooting fawn; 6 
months, $25. 



ANOTHER ONE ON BENNETT. 

There is a game hog in this town who 
has bristles fully developed. Chas. E. 
Hewitt, who has an automatic shot gun, 
went to the Nesqually flats one day last 
week and killed 147 ducks in one day. I 
am in favor of the preservation of game, 
and I abhor such indiscriminate slaughter 
as this. Please give Hewitt such adver- 
tising as he deserves. 

W. H. Cyhley, Tumwater, Wash. 

I wrote Hewitt as follows : 

I understand you recently killed 147 
ducks in one day with an automatic shot 
gun. Kindly let me know if this report 
is correct. 

Here is his reply: 

Correct in every particular. 

Chas. E. Hewitt, Tumwater, Wash. 

Yet Mr. Bennett, President of the Win- 
chester Arms Co., while insisting that his 
company has no intention of making auto- 
matic guns, claims that the automatic gun 
already on the market is one of the most 
harmless, innocent and respectable weapons 
ever invented. He claims that a man can 
not kill any more birds in a day with an 
automatic gun than he could with a double 
barreled gun, that game hogs will not use 
the automatic gun because they like their 
old pump guns better, and all that sort of 
rot. 

Some people are weak minded enough 
to be buncoed by such arguments into ad- 
vocating the making and use of the auto- 
matic. Fortunately, there are a few thou- 
sand sportsmen in this country who think 
for themselves, and who are radically op- 
posed to allowing game hogs to buy and use 



these infernal machines. The number of 
such discerning sportsmen is increasing 
every day. I have on file several thousand 
letters of this tenor. If I should print all 
I get each month they would fill every page 
of Recreation. I can give place to only 
a few, but enough to show the trend of 
sentiment among decent men. The time 
will come when the use of the automatic 
gun will be prohibited by law in every 
State in the Union. 

Hewitt's number on the game hog reg- 
ister is 1041. 



DAMPIER BREAKS THE LAW. 

On page 417 of December, 1899, Recrea- 
tion I published a photograph showing 4 
men standing beside a string of about 200 
pounds of pike, and I labeled the picture 
"Another Bunch of Hogs." E. R. Dampier, 
one of the members of the herd, who claims 
to be a law}^er, wrote me threatening a libel 
suit and suggested that I send him a good- 
sized check in order to secure a settlement 
of the case out of court. Later Mr. A. L. 
Vermilya took a shy at Mr. Dampier, in 
verse, which was published on page 501 of 
Recreation for December, 1900. 

Now comes a clipping from a Minnesota 
paper stating that this same E. R. Dampier 
has been up in the United States Court, 
charged with an infraction of the postal 
regulations. The report states that he wrote 
a letter, rolled it in a newspaper, put a one 
cent stamp on the wrapper and sent it 
through the mails. The full penalty of 
$10 was laid against Dampier and the 
costs in the case brought the total assess- 
ment up to $28. 

Dampier could have bought 1400 2 cent 
stamps for that amount and these would 
probably have lasted him the rest of his 
life. He is even a Dampier fool than I 
thought he was. 



State Game Protector Jackson, of Schen- 
ectady, captured Henry Shafer. of Schenec- 
tady, while fishing with a fyke net in Lish- 
askill. Of course, Henry claimed that he 
was fishing for minnows, but he had some 
good game fishes in his possession when 
taken and the court levied a tax of $60 
on him. His net was confiscated and Llem 
ry is now a wiser if a poorer man. 



The story printed on pages 331 and 332 
of May Recreation entitled "A Race With 
a Grizzly," was written by S. G. Fisher. 
Grangeville, Idaho, but owing to an over- 
sight his name was not printed at the head 
of the article, and the initials "M. C. H." 
were substituted. This paragraph is print- 
ed for the purpose of giving Mr. Fisher due 
credit for the article. 



RECREATION. 



127 



— 



One 
Billion 

Dollars 

of Life Insurance in Force in 

THE 




PRUDENTIAL ^ 

HAS THE. '. A 1 

'STRENGTH OF 
GIBRALTAR 



INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

OF 
AMERICA 

JOHN F. DRYDEN, President. 
Home Office, NEWARK, N. J, 

Write for Particulars of Policies, Dept. g2 



Visit The Prudential's Exhibit, Palace of 
Education, World's Fair, St. Louis. 



128 



RECREATION. 



NO DAMAGES ASSESSED. 

JOHN C. MCNEILL. 

At noon I had stretched my weary length 
on the wiregrass where the blackgums threw 
their densest shade and where a brook 
tinkled along over its gravel bed almost 
under my ear. That liquid tinkle was the 
accompaniment of sweet dreams. Half doz- 
ing, I was conscious of the thrushes and 
catbird, whose curiosity I had aroused, 
perched above and about me, conferring 
with one another. 

It was late in August. The gums were 
shot with red, the poplars with yellow, and 
flowering fennel filled the air with that 
fragrance which is the infallible prophet of 
autumn. A land of brooks, all sand- 
bedded, clear and cool. 

But where was this and how came I 
there? It was this way: 

Traveling through North Carolina, I 
stopped at Aberdeen over night for railroad 
connections. At the hotel I noticed behind 
the desk an old friend whom I had lost 
track of for years. 

"Hello, Powell!" I cried. "This you?" 
"The same old 76," he answered, "and I 
know exactly what you have come here 
for." 

"Ah !" I wondered. "Kindly inform me." 
"You came with no other object than to 
take a day off with me. Hold on, now !" 
as I started to express my regrets. "You 
merely wanted me to inform you. I am 
off to the sand hills before day, and you 
are the man I'm looking for. If you don't, 
have a high heel time I'll stand the dam- 
ages. 

The upshot was that by peen of dawn 
next morning we were 6 miles from town* 
By sunrise we had reached the camping 
ground, fed the mare, and Powell had the 
eggs sputtering in the spider and the coffee 
simmering in the pot. 

Breakfast being disposed of. we shoul- 
dered our rifles and meandered along the 
various courses of the brook in quest of 
squirrels. Our dog was a snlit eared black 
ard tan fox hound, who had cultivated a 
taste for squirrels but had not acquired 
much wisdom. Rarely did he tree without 
having trailed half an hour, bawling sonor- 
ously at every step and scaring the quarry 
entirely out of reach. The woods were 
well grown with Dost-oak, a choice resort 
for squirrels, and the hound commonlv 
came to his stand by one of them. After 
the noise he had made on the trail, how- 
ever, we wasted little time looking for the 
squirrel where the do£ advised. If we 
found the game at all it was usually several 
hundred yards away in the top of a tall 
Dine. 

^ And it was only a question of . finding 
them, for we killed all we saw. Once a 
drove of a dozen turkeys got up before us, 
and with loud "tuck, tucking" passed over 
the hill. It was out of season for turkeys 
and we had not come prepared for them ; 
so there was nothing for it but to watch 
them out of sight and say au revoir. 



We followed a cow path — a deer path, 
Powell called it — to the run of Lumber riv- 
er, which at that point is no more than 
a well fed creek. The swamp is almost 
tropical in its luxuriant vegetation. Tall, 
clean bodied trees made with their mossy 
tops a green tinted twilight even under the 
August sun. Thousands of birds kept the 
swamp ringing. There, where the foot of 
man so rarely came, I felt we had stolen a 
march on the riotous songsters and crept 
into their concert uninvited. The river, 
dark with the dye of cypress roots, and 
full of the shimmering reflection of its 
guardian trees and its fringe of reeds, 
twisted and growled at the horned banks 
which blocked its way. It was solitude 
primeval. Several purple tailed scorpions 
stretched lazily along the knotty trunks of 
fallen trees, basking in the flecks of sun- 
light. They offered tempting targets, and, 
if we missed at first shot, there was no 
hurry : they were right there to stay until 
we knocked the treddles out. We saw a 
mink swim the stream and stuck a ball, if 
not in him, near him. Anyway, he passed 
suddenly from view. 

I should have liked to linger there hours ; 
but our shadows crouched close about our 
heels and we knew it was getting tow r ard 
high noon. 

In the afternoon Powell waked me from 
the delicious snooze I described in the be- 
ginning, in order that I should help him get 
a rabbit which the hound had put into a 
hollow log. 

Then we set our faces to the hills. The 
white patches of sand were checkered with 
turkey tracks, and occasionally we noticed 
where a deer had driven his sharp hoof into 
the ground. Wild scupperndngs grew there- 
about in abundance, with a small scatter- 
ing of muscadines. They were just ripen- 
ing, and the eager manner in which we 
nosed among the thick leaves after those 
black and yellow clusters testified to our 
relish for them. 

Presently we came to the crest of a long 
ridge, whence we had the prospect of the 
misty blue hills miles beyond the river. 
Below was a meadow, sparsely grown with 
sassafras and persimmon and carpeted with 
wiregrass. In that meadow, far out of rifle 
range, a big buck was feeding, and even 
while we looked at and admired him, he 
raised his antlered head high in the air, 
sniffing the breeze. We knew the cat Was 
out of the wallet, that in a moment he 
would stretch away to the west ; so I set 
my sight and sent him a leaden message. 
Whether the ball struck near him or wheth- 
er he heard the ping of the rifle, I know 
not. But he waited no further investiga- 
tion. Straight for the sheltering woods he 
bounded and struck into them like a bird. 

For crisp, pure air, primal wildness of 
nature, plenty and variety of game, I have 
seen no region superior to the sand hills 
along the Lumber river to the Northward 
of Aberdeen. 

I exacted no damages for the day lost. 



RECREATION. 



J*. 



0^ 



the, 



H 



HENJRY B.HYDX 

FOUNDER* 



&#fc 



m- 






£ 



J.W.ALEXAKDBR 

1 PRESIDENT 




J.H.HYDE 

VICE PRESIDENT 



F **** 
• :^^% 






iV't 



' From flower to flower 

,'■ - for a careless hour. " 

-, BUT AFTER. 

the careless hour' ' 
^M^^'l^W h*iow tHe fate of 
the butterfly. 

D on t flit your life away Take 
a lesson from the ant, not 
front the butterfly, and pro- 
vide for the future. 

An Adequate Endowment 
policy iri the Equitable will 
insure peace and concifbrt 
for your old age — if you live 
-—or will protect ^d provide 
^ for your family if you die . 

IptK' Opportunities for men of character to act as represen ta tives 
WSjm y . Ap#to GAGE E.TARBELL, 2nd Vice President 



♦.<V. 



A 






md 



^ 



For full fnformation fill out this coupon or write 



The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States 
iao BROADWAY, NEW YORK Dept.No.16. 

Please send me information regarding an Endowment for 

$ if issu at years of Age. 

Name 



Address 



jagggg 



ii ' * ' 



i 



130 



RECREATION. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

"For sport the lens is better than the gun." 
I wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their expert* 
ence in photography. 



THE ANNUAL COMPETITION 
Recreation has conducted 8 amateur 
photographic competitions, all of which 
have been eminently successful. The 9th 
opens April 1st, 1904, and will close No- 
vember 30th, 1904. 

Following is a list of prizes to be 

awarded : 

First prize: A Long Focus Korona Camera, 
5x7, made by the Gundlach Optical Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., fitted with a Turner-Reich Anastig- 
mat Lens, and listed at $85. 

Second prize: A 4 x 5 Petite Century Camera, 
with Goerz Anastigmat Lens and Century Shutter, 
listed at $73. 

Third prize: A Royal Anastigmat Lens, 4x5, 
made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, N. Y. ; 
listed at $36. 

Fourth prize: A Waterproof Wall Tent, 12 x 16, 
made by Abercrombie & Fitch, New York, and 
listed at $32. 

Fifth prize: An Al- Vista Panoramic Camera, 
made by the Multiscope and Film Co., Burlington, 
Wis., and listed at $30. 

Sixth prize: A No. 3 Focusing Weno Hawk- 
eye Camera, made by the Blair Camera Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y.j and listed at $27.50. 

Seventh prize: A 12 x 12 Waterproof Wall 
Tent, listed at $16.30. 

Eighth prize : A Tourist Hawkeye Camera, 
4x5, and made by the Blair Camera Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., and listed at $15. 

Ninth prize: A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, made 
by the Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., and 
listed at $8. 

Tenth prize: A pair of High Grade Skates, 
made by Barney & Berry, Springfield, Mass., and 
listed at $6. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
a pair of chrome tanned leather driving or hunt- 
ing gloves made by the Luther Glove Co., and 
listed at $1.50. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
a Laughlin Fountain Pen, listed at $1. 

A special prize: A Goerz Binocular Field Glass, 
listed at $74.25, will be given for the best picture 
of a live wild animal. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures 
or groups of persons, or animals, repre- 
senting in a truthful manner shooting, fish- 
ing, amateur photograph}', bicycling, sail- 
ing or other form of outdoor or indoor 
sport or recreation. Awards to be made 
by 3 judges, none of whom shall be com- 
petitors. 

Conditions : Contestants must submit 2 
mounted prints, either silver, bromide, 
platinum or carbon, of each subject, which, 
as well as the negative, shall become the 
property of Recreation. Negatives not to 
be sent unless called for. 

In submitting pictures, please write sim- 
ply your full name and address on the back 
of each, and number such prints as you 
may send, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then in a letter ad- 



dressed Photographic Editor, Recreation, 

say, for instance : 

No. 1 is entitled ■ . 

Made with a camera. 

lens. 



On a 

Printed on 



plate. 



Length of exposure, 



paper. 



Then add any further information you 
may deem of interest to the judges, or to 
other amateur photographers. Same as to 
Nos. 2, 3, etc. 

This is necessary in order to save post- 
age. In all cases where more than the 
name and address of the sender and serial 
number of picture are written on the back 
of prints I am required to pay letter post- 
age here. I have paid as high as $2.50 on 
a single package of a dozen pictures, in ad- 
dition to that prepaid by the sender, on ac- 
count of too much writing on the prints. 

Any number of subjects may be sub- 
mitted. 

Pictures that may have been published 
elsewhere, or that may have been entered 
in any other competition, not available. No 
entry fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look 
at the camera. Occupy them in some other 
zvay. Many otherwise fine pictures have 
failed to win in the former competitions 
because the makers did not heed this warn- 
ing. 



LANTERN SLIDE MAKING. 

G. T. HARRIS, IN PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Once the lantern slide worker has passed 
his apprenticeship, he will find the field of 
modern developers extensive enough to af- 
ford him many months' work, and the re- 
sults will be sufficiently varied to suit the 
most exacting. With the following devel- 
oper, for black, 

Amidol 20 grains 

Sodium sulphite 240 

Potassium bromide 10 " 

Water 10 ounces 

development is rapid, but it is necessary to 
give a seemingly excessive opacity to com- 
pensate for the loss of fixing. Any forcing 
of development through under exposure is 
to be carefully avoided in lantern slide 
work. The development should bring out 
the detail steadily through the various grad- 
ations, until the extreme -high lights ap- 
pear, and these should remain perfectly 
clear while the slide is acquiring sufficient 
opacity. 

When development is judged complete, 
place the slide quickly, without washing, in 
an acid fixing bath. It is a mistake to sub- 
mit lantern slides to a washing process be- 
tween development and fixing, as during the 
process the slide acquires sufficient density 
to cover the highest lights that have been 



Amateur photography. 



131 



So zealously guarded. I am aware that 
many advise against the use of an acid fix- 
ing bath, and probably will continue to do 
so. My own experience is absolutely in its 
favor, and I have constantly employed it in 
the form following for the last 14 or 15 
years. For lantern slide work I particu- 
larly recommend its employment. Fading, 
marks of any and every description, have at 
various times been attributed to its employ- 
ment, but I have never had either a negative 
or a lantern slide fade, and I seen no rea- 
son for an acid fixing bath to cause fading 
if property made. 

Prepare the bath by dissolving in 10 
ounces of water one ounce of sodium bisul- 
phite; in another 10 ounces of* water, 4 
©unces of sodium hyposulphite ; then, while 
stirring, pour the bisulphite solution slowly 
into the soda solution. When mixed, the 
formula will stand thus : 

Sodium hyposulphite 4 ounces 

Sodium bisulphite 1 ounce 

Water 20 ounces 

On removing the slide from the fixing 
bath and examining it before a piece of opal 
or ground glass, it should appear crisp, 
without any appearance of inkiness in the 
shadows, and when laid on a sheet of white 
paper the extreme high lights should have 
the appearance of being bare glass. 

For warm black, try the following amidol 
developer : 

Amidol 20 grains 

Sodium sulphite 240 " 

Ammonium carbonate •. 20 " 

Potassium bromide 20 " 

Water 10 ounces 

The exposure for warm black colors, 
when using the foregoing, will be about 
double the exposure required for black, and 
development will be rather slower; it 
should not be carried so far, however. 

When the production of warm colors is 
attempted with gelatine plates, it is better 
to adopt pyrogallol as the developer. Not 
that warm colors can not be obtained with 
the modern reducing agents, but pyro and 
ammonia undoubtedly produce them with 
greater facility than the others do. The 
subjoined formula has given me good 
browns with about 5 times the exposure 
needful for black. With some plates, to 
produce brown colors, it may be necessary 
to add more bromide : 

A. Pyrogallol 30 grains 

Sodium sulphite 120 " 

Citric acid 3 " 

Water 10 ounces 

B. Ammonium Bromide 40 grains 

Liquor Ammonia (880) ....30 minims 
Water 10 ounces 

Take equal parts of each to develop. 



When developing for warm colors, the 
image acts differently from a black im- 
age. With the latter the gradations appear 
crisply defined on the surface of the film, 
but with warm colored images the picture 
seems buried in the film, and is only seen 
when examining the plate by transmitted 
light. This appearance is puzzling to the 
novice, and misleads him into giving greater 
density to the plate than is desirable. Only 
experience can enable him to judge when 
correct opacity has been reached, but he will 
find, where warm colors are in question, 
that a small apparent density will prove on 
fixing to have been ample. 

The development of lantern plates in the 
production of warm colors is often a te- 
dious operation, requiring perhaps 10 or 15 
minutes, and there seems no way of curtail- 
ing and retaining at the same time the qual- 
ity of the image. Loss of time may be pre- 
vented by using a grooved tank and leaving 
the plates to develop while other exposures 
are being made. Development is so slow 
that over development need never be feared. 
The temperature of the developer should 
never be, below 65 degrees F. 

Should warmer colors than those given 
by the foregoing developer be required, they 
may be obtained by adding to each ounce 
of the mixed developer 20 or 30 minims of 
a 10 per cent solution of ammonium carbo- 
nate. It has been stated, but not on suffi- 
ciently good authority, that the use of car- 
bonate causes fading. In place of adding 
the carbonate as a 10 per cent solution, it 
may be combined with the developer in 
bulk, in which case the following pyrogallol 
formula is a convenient one : 

A. Pyrogallol 20 grains 

Ammonium bromide 20 " 

Sodium sulphite 120 " 

Sulphite acid 25 minims 

Water 10 ounces 

B. Liquor ammonia (.880) . . . .100 minims 

Ammonium carbonate 20 grains 

Water 10 ounces 

Take equal parts of each to develop. 

When toning lantern slides there is al- 
ways some danger of the gelatine becoming 
stained by the toning agent ; in which case 
the high lights, which should be absolutely 
transparent gelatine, have their original 
purity degraded by the ground color of the 
slide. This fault is especially noticeable 
when toning slide* with the uranium and 
ferricyanide toning bath. Unless great care 
has been exercised a brown tint pervades 
the whole of the slide where clear gelatine 
should exist, due to the toning agent hav- 
ing stained the gelatine at the same time 
that it toned the image. 

Many, if not all, toning processes have, 
at the same time, a slight intensifying ac- 
tion, and this intensification makes itself un- 



132 



RECREATION \ 



pleasantly apparent when the slide dries, as 
the shadows usually become heavy, losing 
the transparency of slides that have not 
been subjected to toning operations. 

(To be continued.) 



PYRO. 



In spite of the numerous new developing 
agents that are placed on the market from 
time to time, pyro still continues to hold its 
place as the standard developer. That the 
manufacturers of the newer developers re- 
cognize its worth is evinced by their claims 
that their developer is equal to pyro, or 
produces results like pyro. After a fair 
trial of many of the more recent produc- 
tions, I for one am certain that as a de- 
veloping agent for plates and films, pyro is 
still pre-eminently the best. Much of the 
prejudice against pyro is due to a lack of 
knowledge as to the best method of pre- 
paring it for use. A description of the 
method I have used for some years with 
good results may help to solve the problem 
for some of those who have had unpleasant 
experiences in the past with stained fingers 
and spoiled developer. 

To be at its best, pyro developer must be 
freshly mixed, as it oxidizes in solution the 
quickest^ of any developer. My developer is 
made as follows : . 

Take 2 4-ounce bottles with large necks. 
In one put a handful of sodium sulphite, 
either crystals or the dried powder. In the 
other bottle put the same quantity of sod- 
ium carbonate, commonly known as sal 
soda. Fill the bottles with water, using 
boiled water if possible. The idea is to 
make saturated solutions of these 2 chemi- 
cals and to this end there should always be 
a quantity of undissolved crystals in each 
bottle. 

To make a normal developing solution 
take one dram of each of these solutions to 
each ounce of water, and add one to 2 
grains of dry pyro for each ounce of wa- 
ter used. 

^ For measuring the pyro I use a wooden 
mustard spoon which holds 2 grains when 
dipped up even full from the box. The han- 
dle of this spoon is cut short, so it can be 
kept in the box of pyro. 

The superiority of this method of work- 
ing is at once apparent. Both sulphite and 
carbonate of soda are stable in solution, 
•though after a time the sulphite probably 
changes somewhat, but this need not trou- 
ble the amateur, as the quantity of solution 
mentioned (4 ounces) will be used long be- 
fore any change can take place. 

By adding the pyro dry there is no guess- 
work as to its strength. In case of under 
exposure, or whenever desirable, the devel- 
oper may be easily modified, as one may in- 
crease any of the components at will. 

Bromide of potassium is not needed; at 



least I find ho use for it, though it will 
do no harm if one wishes to use it. The 
proportions I have mentioned as constitut- 
ing a normal developer may of course be 
modified to suit different plates at the 
pleasure of the user, but I find that the de- 
veloper as given works nicely with nearly 
all the standard makes of plates now on 
the market. Some may require a trifle 
more pyro to produce the required density; 
and it may be desirable to increase or re- 
duce the quantity of sulphite solution, ac- 
cording to whether one prefers a negative 
of a gray or a brown tint, increasing the 
sulphite if a gray color is desired. In any 
case, the character of the negative is much 
under the control of the operator, and the 
advantages of this method of working can 
not fail to impress anyone who gives it a 
fair trial. 

C. M. Whitney, Bayonne, N. J. 



SNAP SHOTS. 
There is no doubt that better results may 
be secured by using backed plates, for in- 
terior as well as landscape work, especially 
where one photographs slightly toward the 
sun or where the strong lights filter 
through the tree tops. I would not use 
anything but a backed plate for any sub- 
ject. It is simple to back your own plates. 
Get a bottle of regular photo paste and 
mix a small portion with water and burnt 
sienna or burn umber. If alcohol is used, 
the backing will dry more rapidly. In 
backing I use a V/2 inch brush, going over 
the back of the plate until it is all covered. 
Keep as far from your light as possible 
when backing, to avoid the danger of fog- 
ging the plate. Before developing have a 
pail of clean water and soak the plate a few 
minutes ; then the backing will come off 
readily. Try it. It is a great improve- 
ment. C, Bethlehem, Pa. 



Local reduction of a too intense high 
light can often be accomplished by rubbing 
down that portion of the negative with a 
wad of cotton wet with wood alcohol. The 
cotton should not be so 'full of alcohol that 
it flows out on the film. This means of re- 
ducing is under perfect control, and one 
can rub the film as thin as can be desired. 
It leaves no stain or mark which will show 
in the print. 

At times my chrome alum fixing bath 
has become muddy and the precipitate has 
given the negatives a mottled appearance. 
I used the Cramer formula for the bath 
and followed directions but yet the thing 
often happened. I find that by reducing 
the quantity of sulphuric acid slightly and 
by slowly adding one solution B to solution 
A, with continuous stirring, the bath re- 
mains clear and clean. 

R. L. Wadhams, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



RECREATION. 



IX 





5* 7 PREMO 

FILM 

PACKS 



All the convenience of film with the 
advantage of focusing on ground glass. 

A Premo Film Pack Adapter will 

convert your 2% x 4/4 > 4 x 5 or 5 x 7 
Premo into a film camera which loads 
in daylight in 3 seconds with the 1 2 
exposures Film Pack. 



ASK THE DEALER 

3^x4^ 4x5 5x7 

Premo Film Pack Adapter $1.00 $1.50 $2.50 
Premo Film Pack (12 exposures) .70 .90 1.60 

Premo Catalogue free at the dealers' or by mail. 

Mention Recreation. 



ROCHESTER OPTICAL CO. 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 




X 



RECREATION. 




COMBINATION 

HAWK=EYE 



A New Film Camera which 
allows the operator to focus 
on ground glass. 

May also be used with glass plates. 

Fitted with Extra Rapid Rectilinear lens, B. & L. 
Automatic Shutter, rising and falling front con- 
trolled by rack and pinion. 

No. 3 Combination HawK=Eye, pictures 3% x A% % 
equipped for film and plates, = = $27.50 

BLAIR CAMERA COMPANY, 

Send for Catalogue. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




I have received the s + sel hunting boat 
from the W. H. Mullins Boat Co., Salem, 
Ohio, and the refrigerator basket from the 
Burlington Basket Co., Burlington, Iowa, 
and am highly pleased with both. They are 
just what I want for both hunting and fish- 
ing excursions, and should an opportunity 
arise in future I shall be glad to place an 
order for either concern. 

I thank you very much for your prompt- 
ness in having my premium forwarded, and 
I hope to send you another small subscrip- 
tion list in the near future. 

Robt. A. Hume, Vicksburg, Miss. 

Lest you forget, in a fit of aberration. I say 

IT AGAIN. PLEASE MENTION RECREATION. 



OIL PORTRAITS ON APPROVAL 

If you will send me a photo of yourself or a 
friend and state color of hair, eyes and com- 
plexion, I will paint and send you on approval 
an oil or pastel portrait, miniature or life size. 

Canvas, 6x8 or 8xio inches, $10 

Canvas 10x12 or 12x14 inches, $15 

Three-quarters life size, - - $25 

Full life size, - $35 

Z, EMMONS, 58 West 104tK Street 
Reference: Mr, G. O. Shields, New York 



I am getting up another club for the 
camp mattress, and it will include many of 
my last year's subscribers. I had a pe- 
culiar experience with Mr. Meyer, one of 
my former subscribers. Last year when I 
asked him to subscribe he said, "Yes, I 
will give you a dollar, but it is simply a 
donation for I shall never read the maga- 
zine." Therefore I did not ask him to re- 
new. He asked me what I was going to 
try for this year, and I said a mattress. He 
said if he had known I was getting up a 
club he would gladly have given me his 
name, as Recreation is the most instructive 
and the best little magazine he had ever 
read. He wanted it another year, so I took 
his name, though my club was completed. 

Recreation has done this community a 
lot of good. I have endorsed your senti- 
ments everywhere, and I hear others doing 
the same thing. Where we formerly saw 
dozens going out to the lakes before the 
season opened, now there is scarcely one 
and we have no game wardens either. If 
Recreation could get into all homes, we 
should need no wardens. I confess I used 
to be a hog at heart and the only thing that 
kept me from being one in earnest was my 
inability to get the game; but thanks to 
Recreation, I am not one now in any re- 
spect. J. N. Canover, Melrose, Minn. 



It's delightful for a tree to be shady, ex> 
cept when it happens to be a family tree. — 
Exchange, 



RECREATION. 



XI 



A MOOSE HUNT IN ONTARIO. 

We had been talking about a hunting 
trip some time and at last decided to start 
October ist. We left my farm at 4 a. m., 
as we had 15 miles to walk over a rough 
trail. Our hunting camp was in the town 
of Conmee on the edge of the unsurveyed 
land in a capital game country. We reached 
it about 3 p. m. and proceeded to make 
things comfortable. The camp is of logs, 
10 x 12, with a rain proof roof. 

We were awakened about 4.30 and 
climbed out to find it was a capital morn- 
ing, Southwest wind and a little cloudy. 
After breakfast we set out and soon dis- 
covered fresh moose tracks. We followed 
the trail to where the moose had lain down 
the night before. There we separated, Ed 
circling while I stayed with the trail. We 
met again in an hour and decided that the 
moose was feeding in a valley half a mile 
away where there was lots of red willow. 
We approached the spot up wind and on 
reaching the top of the bluff looked over 
and saw a bull moose. We dropped back 
and worked our way around the end of the 
bluff which brought us within 100 yards 
of our quarry. Crack went Ed's .40- .65 
and down went the bull with his back 
broken. He had fine head gear, 48 inches 
spread with 15 prongs on one side and 14 
on the other. We rough dressed him and 
started to the camp for axes to brush a 
trail to haul him out over. We got him 
to the settlement the next day. Then we 
returned to camp again, for it was my turn 
to make good. 

It rained the next day and no hunting 
was done, but Bill told us of a big bull he 
had seen while we were away. The follow- 
ing morning broke clear. We hunted all 
day but had no luck. The next day was 
my lucky one. We started early and I 
struck across country alone. After walk- 
ing an hour I found fresh tracks leading 
into a poplar bluff. Starting to follow 
them, I heard a great crashing and saw a 
bull's antlers showing above the brush. 
I fired 2 shots but missed, so decided to 
wait until the animal reached a clear spot 
for which he was heading. When he came 
out in the open, I let drive and put a .38-72 
through his shoulder and lungs. He ran 
about 100 yards, stopped and fell dead. I 
dressed him, admired his head, and hustled 
back to camp to tell the boys. They had 
not returned when I got back but Ed soon 
arrived and said he had killed a buck deer. 
Bill came in a few minutes after, but he 
had had no luck. We got the buck and 
the moose out the next day and concluded 
we had done enough killing for one year. 

Bill could not reconcile himself to his 
bad luck, so went back alone and got his 
bull after 3 days' hard hunting. These 
moose were all secured by still hunting, 
no calls being used. 

R. H, Clarke, O'Conor, Ont., Can. 



There is 

No DarK=Room 

in the 

KODAK 

way of picture 
making/ It's 
cleaner, simpler, 
pleasanter than 
the old way, but 
more important 
than all, it gives 
better pictures. 



The proof of the complete success of the 
KodaK Developing Machine lies in the fact 
that it is now in every day commercial use 
and those establishments which have adopted 
it are getting an improved quality of work. 
Machine finished negatives are free from finger 
marks and other blemishes. 



KODAK Developing Machines, 

$2.00 to $10.00. 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 



Kodak Catalogue Free, 
at the dealers, or by mail. 



Rochester, N. Y. 



xii RECREATION. 



DO YOU WANT 

A Good, Reliable, Substantial, Well Made 

REVOLVER? 



If so, send me 

4 Yearly Subscriptions 

I will send you such a Revolver as a premium 




It is made by the HARRINGTON & RICHATCDSON ARMS CO., 
and this means good material and good workmanship. 



Any other article made by that firm can be had on a basis of one yearly sub- 
scription to each dollar of the list price. 



SAMPLE COPIES FO% USE IN CANVASSING 
FU%NISHEV ON APPLICATION. 



Address RECREATION 

23 West 24th Street New York City 



RECREATION. 



xiu 




My Acme boat has arrived and I am 
well satisfied with it. I can not see how 
you can give such liberal premiums. All 
my friends and acquaintances know of it. 
They were giving me quite a jolly about it 
before it came, but they all opened their 
eyes when they saw what I received for my 
work. I have given my subscription to a 
friend who is anxious to secure a similar 
boat. I shall continue to gain new sub- 
scribers and agents who are anxious to earn 
your great premiums. 

Louis D. Laccorn, Reading, Pa. 



If you would double the price of your 
magazine you would not lose a reader here. 
R. C. Hoagland, Spangle, Wash. 



I thank you for the gun I received from 
the Savage Arms Company as a premium 
for subscriptions for Recreation. I am' so 
enthusiastic over the gun that I scarcely 
know how to express myself. I have tried 
it in every way, to my entire satisfaction. 
I have used many guns and the action of 
the Savage is the finest I have ever seen, 
regardless of price. I appreciate the spe- 
cial effort you have made to furnish me 
something extra in the way of a rifle. This 
gun is entirely beyond anything that I 
could have expected as a premium. I have 
earned several of your premiums, and have 
seen several that other people have earned, 
and they have all been first quality. 

F. McCloughan, St. Louis, Mo. 




JjUZtl? * 



Eye Glasses into Spectacles. Spectacles into Eye Glasses ^^ VVITH ^^^F 'pfT 
BE PROTECTED ! "^^ *ww««i*.. 

DON'T BREAK OK LOSE YOUR GLASSES IN EXERCISE, WIND AND STORM 

Can be attached by anyone Send thickness of tens when ordering by mail 

Price in Nickel 50c. a pair. Gilt 75c. a pair. Gold Filled $1 a pair. Solid Gold $2.50 a pair. 

Established 1842 GALL & LEMBKE, Dept.C, 1 W. 42d St. 21 Union Sq., New York Send for Circular 

^ ■" .. — — =— ™— — g 



xiv RECREATION. 



The Acme oi Sport 
in Rifle Shooting 

can only be attained by the use of a telescope. 
With a high power instrument of this kind attached to 
your rifle you can do much better work at any distance 
than with ordinary sights. Furthermore, you can 
see your bullet hole in the target, after each shot up 
to 200 yards and thus know just what you are doing. 

Send me 10 yearly subscriptions to 

RECREATION 

and I will send you a Rough Rider Telescope to fit your 
-rifle. Or you can ship your rifle to the factory and have 
the tube attached. Any other telescope made by the 
Malcolm Rifle Telescope Co., Syracuse, N. Y. will be 
furnished on the basis of one yearly subscription to each 
dollar of the list price. 



Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 



23 West 24th St NEW YORK 



RECREATION. 



xv 




"THE Official Photo- 
■ graphs of the St, 

Louis Exposition which 
you see reproduced in the various magazines and news- 
papers are all made with the Goerz lens. 

The Official Photographers of the St. Louis Fair have 
all adopted the Goerz lens to the exclusion of all others. 

In block 75 of the Liberal Arts Building the Goerz 
Optical Works show their automatic process of grinding 
and polishing these famous lenses in operation. 

Main Offices, Berlin-Friedenaw, Germany, 
Branch Offices, 4. and 5 Holborn Cir rus , London, England, 21 Rue de F Entrepot, Paris. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

Room 27, 52 E. Union Square, New York City. 



It was the elephant who spoke first. 

"My friends," he said, "this is an indig- 
nation meeting to protest against the way we 
are being written up by man. I look around 
me and on every side see nothing but the 
heroes of some animal book. As a matter 
of fact there isn't one of us that has the 
feelings or instincts of a man. And yet 
these fellows try to make it appear as if we 
had." 

The sand-hill stag sprang to his feet. 

"What my friend, the elephant, has said 
is most true," he cried. "It's a shame that 
we should have to submit to this sort of 
thing. Has anyone a resolution to make ?" 

A Rocky mountain bear, with his secre- 
tary, Mr. Crow, got up. 

"My secretary has prepared the following: 

" 'Whereas, Man is a creature of mere in- 
stinct, and not reason, that his habits of 
observation prevent him from ever know- 
ing the true character of the animal world ; 
therefore, 

" 'Resolved, That from this time hence- 
forth, he keep us out of his books.' " 

And amid the most tremendous enthusi- 
asm the resolution was unanimously adopt- 
ed. — Addison Fox, Jr., in Life. 



I received the shot guns the Davenport 
people sent me and am much pleased with 
them. I thank you and hope to do some 
more business with you soon. 

J. Frederic Wadsworth, Erie, Pa. , 



F O UN D! 




A place to buy Cameras, I/enses or 
Supplies cheaper 

3^x4^ Folding Film Camera like cut for $7.50 
4x5 Folding- Film Camera like cut for $12.00 

Takes Eastman or an}- other film 

4x5 Plates at 25c. doz. 5x7 Plates at 45c. doz. 

M.Q. Tubes to make 32 oz. Developer at 4c. each 

Send for Bargain Lists. You will be sur- 
prised at low prices. We buy and exchange. 

Mention Recreation 

National Specialty Co. 

49 West 28th Street, New York City 



XVI 



RECREATION. 



SOME, PRACTICAL TESTS. 

In outfitting for my summer's trip in the 
Canadian Northwest I naturally chose, as 
far as possible, articles advertised in Rec- 
reation, and it may interest such of my 
readers as may be planning similar trips, to 
know something of my experiences with 
these goods. 

I bought of Abercrombie & Fitch, 314 
Broadway, New York, 2 tents and a fly, 
made of fine Japan silk and treated with 
their waterproofing material. The larger 
tent is 7 x 9 feet and weighs only 14 pounds. 
It rolls easily into a package that a man 
may carry comfortably under his arm, or 
strap on behind his saddle ; yet the tent 
proved thoroughly waterproof under the 
most trying conditions and afforded 2 of us 
an admirable summer shelter. It rained or 
snowed 72 out of the 90 days we were out, 
and sometimes the rain fell almost inces- 
santly for 24 hours at a stretch, yet never 
a drop of water came through the tent. We 
could, when necessary, pin the tent down 
to the ground and tie up the front so tight 
that mosquitoes and gnats, of which there 
were myriads, could not get in. Wright 
and I passed many a comfortable night in 
this tent when my companions, who were 
less fortunate, were tortured by insects all 
night. 

The fly is 10x12 feet in size and served 
as a comfortable dining room and kitchen. 
We usually pitched the fly with the ridge 
pole 7 to 8 feet from the ground, and the 
outer edges about 4 feet high. This gave 
us ample room to walk about under the fly, 
without stooping. This fly weighs only 6 
pounds. 

The smaller tent is 5 x 7 feet in size and 
was used generally as a bath house. I 
could set up my portable bath tub and have 
a warm bath when the temperature was be- 
low the freezing point. 

The bath tub was also provided by Aber- 
crombie & Fitch, and is simply a piece of 
rubber cloth, 4 feet square. Gromets are 
placed in the edges and corners, so that by 
driving 4 stakes and tying the cloth to 
them properly, I had a bath tub about 2^4 
feet square and a foot deep. 

I also used 2 of their waterproof canvas 
duffle bags and which kept my clothing and 
other articles dry through a wet summer's 
campaign. 

By tying up the false muzzle, so to speak, 
with which these bags were provided, and 
then lacing the outer bag over this, the 
package becomes absolutely waterproof, and 
might be left in a lake or river over night 
with entire safety to the contents. I had 
these same people make me 2 suits of khaki 
hunting clothing that gave me good service. 
) Abercrombie & Fitch also made me a 
special sheet of canvas in which to roll my 
bedding. This sheet is 7 feet wide and 9 
feet long, with i l / 2 inch leather straps rivet- 
ed to one end, with which to cinch the roll 
after it is made up. This saved my bed- 
ding from any possible wetting, even though 
the horses carrying it might have to swim 



a river. This canvas could also be made 
useful on occasions, as a floor cloth for a 
tent. 

Another part of my outfit obtained from 
this house was a set of aluminum pails, 
cups, plates, knives, forks, spoons, etc. 
There are in this set 3 pails that nest, one 
within another, and the smallest one holds 
about 2 gallons of water. It was a real 
luxury to always have plenty of pails in 
which to carry water, especially when we 
had to go some distance from camp to get 
it. There are table trimmings in the set 
for 4 men and the whole outfit weighs only 
6 pounds. It is packed in a canvas bag and 
fits nicely between the forks of the pack 
saddle and between the sides of the packs. 
No camping outfit made up for a pack train 
or a canoe trip would be complete without 
a set of this aluminum ware. 

I used a Kenwood sleeping bag and found 
it a real luxury. If the night happened to 
be warm, as some nights were, I could 
crawl in on top of all but one thickness 
of the felt. If it were a cold night, then 
I had the same number of blankets over 
me as under me, and always slept warm. 

The Kenwood is made by F. C. Huyck & 
Sons, Albany, New York. 

A Bausch & Lomb prismatic field glass 
was another real luxury in the outfit. It 
often saved me a mile of travel to investi- 
gate some object which I could study just 
as well from camp or from wherever else 
I might happen to be. It is no exaggera- 
tion to say that you can identify a blue 
grouse or a fool hen or a ptarmigan, and 
distinguish one from the other, at a distance 
of 200 yards by means of one of these 
glasses. You can see a man 2 miles and 
can ordinarily tell at that distance, a white 
man from an Indian. The Bausch & Lomb 
glass is certainly one of the most powerful 
ever made. 

The Gall and Lembke barometer, ther- 
mometer and compass, combined, also 
proved of infinite value in its various lines. 
One seldom has occasion to use a compass 
in the mountains, but sometimes in cloudy 
weather it does become necessary to know 
the points. Moreover, one often wishes to 
know the temperature of the air and this 
little compact instrument was often in de- 
mand for this purpose. Then in climbing 
mountains or descending into canyons and 
valleys, or even on the train, it was ex- 
tremely interesting to know how high or 
low we were. In mountain travel, and 
especially in climbing hills, you may imagine 
you have climbed 1,000 or 2,000 feet, when 
in fact, you may have onfy gone up 500 or 
600 or 800 feet. At such times you are tempt- 
ed to accuse the aneroid of not keeping good 
time, so to speak. So also does a man 
often question the accuracy of his compass 
when traveling in the woods and when he 
is sure North is where the compass says 
South is ; but the little mechanical contri- 
vance has no wicked ends to serve nor any 
tricks to play on its owner. If it be in good 
order, it tells the truth, no matter if it 
(Concluded on page xviii.) 



RECREATION. 



xvi 1 




FOOD 



FOR 



THOUGHT 



Analysis of the perspiration of a brain-worker shows 
the amount of brain effort by the volume of little particles of 
Phosphate of Potash thrown off by the brain when working. 

Brain (also nerve tissue) wears away under the daily 
grind just as other parts of the body do and must be rebuilt 
daily by food containing Albumen and Phosphate of Potash 
or Brain and Nerves will grow weak and consequently the 
whole body must suffer. 

You know brain-fag, nervous prostration and similar 
troubles come from taxing Brain or Nerves and at the same 
time failing to select proper food to repair the wear and tear. 

In GRAPE-NUTS food these necessary elements are 
found pre-digested so anyone can assimilate them and a 
strong, sturdy, money-making set of brains can be built on 

Grape-Nuts 



THERE'S A REASON 



XV111 



RECREATION. 



(Continued from page xvi.) 

does bring down upon itself the condem- 
nation of the man behind it. I climbed 
some high peaks last summer and though 
the aneroid did not always read up as I 
felt it should, yet it was interesting to 
know that I was 9,000 or 10,000 or 11,000 
feet high, even if I thought I were much 
higher. I would as soon think of going 
hunting without a gun as without one of 
these instruments. 

This instrument was made by Gall & 
Lembke, 21 Union Square, New York. 

I had some of the greatest trout fishing 
of my life during the summer and it was 
all done with 3 Horton rods, according to 
the conditions. I found a Horton fly rod 
entirely satisfactory and competent. A 
Horton Henshall bass rod served admir- 
ably for certain kinds of trout fishing, 
where it was necessary to use the wild and 
woolly grasshopper, or a piece of the meek 
and lowly hog, or a strip of red meat from 
a ground squirrel, or a chipmunk, or a 
steer, and where the trout were large and 
lusty. Then there were times, when fish- 
ing in lakes or large rivers for the big 
Dolly Varden trout, that it became neces- 
sary to use still heavier tackle and larger 
baits. For this work, I used a 6]/ 2 foot 
Horton bait casting rod. I could hook on 
the hind quarter of a small marmot, or 
the head* and shoulders of a fish that would 
weigh half a pound, and shoot it out into 
the lake 150 feet. I hooked some big fel- 
lows, one of which weighed 8^2 pounds, 
and measured 30^ inches long. He made 
a savage fight but the steel rod was too 
much for him and he had to come in. 

I got my supply of bait hooks, leaders and 
flies from Wm. Mills & Son, 21 Park Place, 
New York, and like everything else they 
sell, these goods stood all kinds of reason- 
able tests. 

I was glad of a chance to make a thor- 
ough test of a pair of hunting gloves made 
by the J. P. Luther Glove Co., of Ber- 
lin, Wis., and they stood up to the maker's 
guarantee in every particular. I used them 
in wet weather, dry weather and cold weath- 
er. I used them for throwing packs, pull- 
ing on cinch ropes, paddling a canoe, chop- 
ping and carrying- wood, cutting trails, 
building ovens and in other rough work 
one has to do on a mountain trip. I wore 
them out in the course of the summer, but 
I think I should have worn out 3 pairs of 
any other leather or buckskin gloves I have 
ever used, in the same length of time. 

G. O. S. 



Punxsutawney, Pa. 
J. P. Luther Glove Co., 
Berlin, Wis. 

Dear Sirs : — I received the gloves which 
were sent me on account of Recreation and 
am more than pleased with them. No per- 
son need be without hand protection while 
hunting when he can get gloves like those 
with but little effort. Thank you for same. 

H. F. Weiss. 



A SHAMEFUL BUTCHERY 

Utica, Nov. 7. — Miss Kate Butterick and her 
escort, Willard Ames, were standing on the shore 
of Indian lake when they saw a large buck in the 
water 20 yards off. They had no gun, but they 
rowed alongside the exhausted animal and seiz- 
ing the antlers, forced the head under water, 
drowning the beast. 

This clipping is from the Buffalo Evening 
News. Shame on the heartless wretches 
who could murder a helpless animal in 
such a way. Please give them what they 
richly deserve. 

Chas. S. Ryan, Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Ames' exposition of the matter is this : 

I see you have heard of my capture of 
the buck, and judging from what I have 
seen of your magazine I expect you to label 
me as hog No. so and so. Nevertheless, I 
will give you an exact account of how it 
happened and you can judge for yourself 
whether our chances were even or not. 

I started out for a row with a lady and 
we saw a buck some distance ahead. I im- 
mediately took after him and soon was 
alongside. He turned and as soon as I 
could turn I followed. We kept this up 
until I was nearly exhausted, as the waves 
and wind were high. We finally succeeded 
in arousing the camp and another boat put 
out. We got the buck between us and as 
he went by me I grabbed his horns, but he 
shook me off and nearly upset the boat. 
The next time I succeeded in holding him 
under. 

Now, as regards the heartlessness of the 
deed : Old hunters have told me since that 
in 99 cases out of 100 the buck would come 
for the boat and upset it, which he could 
do easily, as he weighed about 250 pounds. 
To be tipped out in the middle of the lake 
with a girl on my hands would be embar- 
rassing, to say the least. I think the reason 
he did not attack us was because we had 
a bull dog in the boat that kept whining 
continually. 

Some sportsmen, no doubt, would rather 
shoot a deer 2 or 3 or even a dozen times 
than drown it, but it seems to me it would 
amount to about the same thing to the deer. 

Now you have my opinion in regard to 
the act and the way it was done. I will 
watch for vour opinion. 

Willard H. Ames, Malone, N. Y. 

My opinion can be expressed in a few 
words. The bull dog was evidently the only 
gentleman in the boat, and if the young 
lady had not been in it, it would have been 
a great blessing to the world if the deer 
had swamped the craft. The dog would 
have swum ashore, and you would doubtless 
have gone to the bottom, where you would 
have been harmless in future. Yes, your 
number in the game hog book is 104 1. — 
Editor. 



I buy Recreation at the news stand, and 
would rather miss my midnight lunch while 
on guard duty than any story in your maga- 
zine. Down with the game hogs ! 

Geo. C. Shoemaker, Pittsburg, Pa. 



RECREATION. 



xix 



Hay Fever Sufferers 



"Stay at home-Go anywhere 



»> 



with perfect freedom from Hay Fever symptoms 



IF YOU TAKE 



Orangeine 

(POWDERS) 

Before and during ^expected attack as directed in every 
package. (Three dollar packages are generally 
sufficient.) 

Our mail is now literally flooded with orders and 
tributes, like the following, from our long list of 
"former" Hay Fever sufferers: 



Hon. W. Norman Bole, Judge of Supreme 
Court, British Columbia, says: "I have never 
hitherto found such an efficient remedy for Hay 
Fever, or one that acts so rapidly. Several of 
my friends have had similar experiences." 

Mr. W. F. Smith, Jimulco, Mexico: "Your 
medicine for Hay Fever is all that could be 
asked for." 

Mrs. J. C. Kuhlke, Brooklyn. N. Y.: "I send 
$5 to join your club. I use so many of your 
powders for Hay Fever and other ailments," 

Mrs. S. D. Burton, Blue Lake, Idaho: "I have 
tried your powders for Hay Fever and they 
have helped me." 

W. Q. Heimlich, Buffalo, N. Y.: "Since the 
receipt of your last letter my Hay Fever has 
practically disappeared, due, no doubt, to my 
rigid adherence to your instructions." 

firs. J. D. Ridgeway, Whiting, Kan.: "My 
daughter and myself have used four $1 boxes- of 
Orangeine and found it an excellent remedy to 
relieve Hay Fever and Sick Headache." 

Mrs. E. B. Collins, Carson City, Mich.: "En- 
closed find $2 for Orangeine. No sign of Hay 
Fever yet, aside from that tired feeling, which 
Orangeine immediately relieves." 

Conrad Rockel, Dallas City, 111.: "Please send 
me two boxes of Orangeine for Hay Fever. I 
.have used two boxes already and it is doing me 
good. I think two more will keep Hay Fever off." 

John W. Oliver, Beaver Ridge, Tenn.: "As 
Hay Fever season is near I feel it behooves me 
to get a supply of your powders. J think 
Orangeine is a God-send tq humanity," 



n Dr. William McCoy, Bloomfield. N. J., says: 
" Fairness compels me to state that Orangeine 
is the most effective agent I have ever employed 
as a remedy for Hay Fever. Personally, in my 
own family, I have used it in almost every 
instance where it is indicated, with most satis- 
factory results." 

A. M. Boyd, Los Olivos. Cal.: "I am controll 
ing my Hay Fever this year with Orangeine." 

J, A. Cox, Fairmount, 111. "I enclose check 
for one dozen boxes of Orangeine. It has kept 
off Hay Fever for three years for my wife." 

H. C. Sexton, Shelbyville, Ind,: " The powders 
gave me relief for my Hay Fever last year." 

Mrs. G. Langdon, Brandon.Vt.: "My Asthma 
got so bad I could not sleep nights, but I have 
taken an Orangeine powder on going to bed for 
two nights and have rested well. The Asthma 
is much better." 

Joseph Elverson, Philadelphia, Pa.: "I have 
been using Orangeine for nearly three years and 
would not be without it. I have found it very 
efficient in many of the common ills of life, 
especially for Hay Fever and Colds." 

Miss Maud Neimeyer, Prospect, O.s *' I have 
been much benefited by the use of Orangeine, 
and highly recomnjend it to all sufferers fforn. 
Asthma and Headaches." 

T? R- Edmonds, Nelson, Mo.: tt I have tried 
Oraugeine for Hay Fever and find it does more 
good and gives me relief quicker than anything 
I have ever tried. I recommend it to all my 
friends.*? " l ' ' lT " 



Write for FBEJE] trial package and full information. Orangeine is sold by 
druggists in $iffl package® (35 powders), 50c packages (15 powders), 25c 
packages (6 powders), 10c package (2 powders), or mailed to any address. 



The Orangeine Chemical Co., 15 Michigan Ave., Chicago 



S** 






mmm. 



M 



mmmmmmmmsmmm 



xx RECREATION. 



Rare and Valuable Books 

I have for sale a few bound copies of Vol. Ill of Recreation, 
July to December, inclusive, 189^; also of Vols. IV and V, 
including the entire issues of 1896; Vols. VII, VIII, XII, 
XIII, XVI, XVII, XVIII and XIX. These are filled with in- 
teresting and valuable matter. The intervening volumes, are 
nearly all out of print, and can never be replaced at any time. 

Vol. Ill sells at $2 . 

Vols. IV and V, one book, at $3 

All others $2 each 

Here are a few titles that will suggest the value of these rare books, to 

lovers of fields and sports : 

The San Juan Islands Maj. John Brooke, U.S.A. 

The Lord Eagle of the Storm Chief Simon Pokagon. 

The Cowboy and the Wheel James B. Adams. 

Two Moose and Three Bear Dr. Hamilton Vreeland. 

Hunting Big Game with a Camera George Shiras, 3d. 

The Fight on Soppa Creek Capt. Wheeler, U.S.A. 

My Best Shot Hon.W.A. Richards, ex-Gov.of Wyo. 

A Prairie Pastoral E. L. Kellogg. 

Woodcock on the Islands F. W. G. Johnson. 

Crossing the Rockies in '61 Major W. H. Schieffelin. 

Salmon Fishing in Labrador Col. Charles E. Fuller. 

Coursing with Greyhound L. F. Bartels. 

A Bald-Faced Grizzly in Camp M. W. Miner. 

A Deer Drive with Spokane Indians Lieut. W. R. Abercrombie. 

Pheasant Shooting Thomas G. Farrell. 

Sitting Bull's Last Medicine Margaret G. Brooks. 

A Mountain Lion Hunt Dr. Robert Meade Smith. 

Trouting on Clark's Fork Gen. F. W. Benteen, U.S.A. 

A Youthful Guide and a Prize Bighorn Hon. I. N. Hibbs. 

The First Day of the Chicken Season A. B. Cowie. 

Goose Shooting in Colorado W. E. King. 

The Cowboy's Version of the Prodigal Son Pony Bill. 

Trouting on the Thunder A. D. Curtis. 

A Bad Grizzly George W. Kellogg. 

My Wife's Moose W. E. Bemis. 

How We Photographed the Wild Cat Coyote Bill. 

Elkland E. T. Seton. 

Hunting Mountain Sheep in a Snowstorm .Capt. S. A. Lawson. 

Grouse in New Hampshire Old Bill. 

Foxes in the Big Swamp C. P. Franklin. 

On the Chilkat Pass H. L. Suydam. 

A Rangeley Vacation C. J. Halpen. 

Pierre's Stratagem H. D. Leadbetter. 

There are many other stories in the books equally interesting. 
You should enrich your library at once by adding to it one of 
each of these rare volumes. 



RECREATION. 



xxi 



A SMALL BOY'S DIARY. 

There is a certain 9 year old kid in 
this city who is keeping a diary. The book 
was given him last Christmas by a relative 
and his father had forgotten all about it un- 
til he accidentally found the volume the 
other day. Curious to see what his small 
son had written in it, he opened the book 
and found that the diary had been faith- 
fully kept. Here are a few of the entries : 

"I am 9 years old to-day. Looked in 
the glass, but whiskars aint sproutin' yet." 

"Sassed a boy. Got lickt." 

"Pop borrid 10 cents for carfair. That 
makes $1.15 he owes me. Wonder if He 
ever get it." 

"Jimmie stole my ball. I lickt 

him for it." 

"Ast Pop for some of my money and he 
giv me a nickil. I want that doler." 

"We feloes got up a base ball club to-day. 
Ime picher. If I had that doler 15 I could 
get a unaform." 

"Pop got paid to-day and giv me my 
money." 

"Mamma borrid a dcler. Dam these 
people anyway. A felo : can't save nothin'." 

"Ast Pop about banks. I want to put 
my money ware carfair aint so skarse." 

"Got lickt again." 

There was more of this, but Pop had 
read enough. As a result, there was a con- 
ference, and now the arrangement is to pay 
5 per cent, a week interest, and settle 
every payday. Jhe kid got his "unaform." 
■ — Philadelphia Telegraph. 



CAMPING. 

J. H. DYER. 

Now have come the days of autumn, 

To the wildwood let us go ; 
For it's there we'll find a freedom 

That in town we never know. 
There we'll wander through the valleys, 

And among the towering hills, 
Where the waning sunlight glimmers 

On the rippling mountain rills. 

We will hear the ruffed grouse drumming, 

And we'll see the wild deer bound, 
As it speeds from lurking hunter 

Or the bay of trailing hound; 
But we'll harm no forest creature, 

Birds may fly and squirrels run; 
.With the camera we'll hunt them, 

Not with life-destroying gun. 

Then at evening, when the sunset 
Paints its glories in the West. 

We will light our cheery camp fire, 
And around it talk and rest. 

Lulled to sleep by Nature's music, 
Peaceful our repose shall be. 

O the pleasures of the woodland ! 

., O the joy of living free! 

■') 

Then a-camping we will go, 

Where the autumn winds sing low ; 

Where the tall oaks wave their branches, 
And the sparkling waters flow. 






me® 



'■■ <£ 



_ — 



^JSSgSg^^aa^J!? 



tm 



One-Third 

of a 

Century 

Standard of the World 

A delicious beautifler, preserver and cleanser of 
the teeth: makes the breath sweet and the gums 
less tender. The metal box Is a handy pack* 
age for toilet table and traveling; no powder to 
litter, no liquid to spill or stain. 

25 cents, at all druggists. 
C. H. STRONG & CO., Props., Chicago, U.S.A. 





WATERPROOF 




COURT 

PLASTER 



Heals Cuts, Abrasions, Hang-Nails, 

Chapped and Split Lips or Fingers, 

Bums, Blisters, Etc. Instantly 

Relieves Chilblains, Frosted 

Ears, Stings of Insects, 

Chafed or Blistered Feet, 

Callous Spots, Etc:, Etc. 

A coating on the sensitive parts 
will protect the feet from being chafed 
or blistered by new or heavy shoes. 

Applied with a brush and immedi- 
ately dries, forming a tough, trans- 
parent, colorless waterproof coating. 

Sportsmen, Motorists, 
Golfers, Mechanics, Etc. 

are all liable to bruise, scratch or 
scrape their skin. "NEW-SKIN" will 
heal these injuries, will not wash off, 
and after it is applied the injury is 
forgotten, as "NEW-SKIN" makes a 
temporary new skin until the broken 
skin is healed under it. 

EACH 

Pocket Size (Size of Illustration), 10c. 
Family Size, .... 25c. 

2 or.. Bottles (for Surgeons and 

■ 50c. 



At the Druggists, or we 
will mail a package any- 
where in the United States 
on receipt of price. 

Douglas Mfg. Go. 

96-102 Church St. 
Dept. W, New York. 



XXI 1 



RECREATION. 



JIGGING SEITEIL 

r tH E CHINA, weft CUT GLASs} 






e» 



^Ibb 



^^ 



For 

$5.00 

This Exquisite 

Cut-Glass 

Comport or 

Bon-Bon 

Dish 

Illustrating our way 
of doing things 
For full particulars write for 
Deautiful picture catalog No. 
14 U, of more than a thousand 
articles suitable for presents. 

"34 ' ess than elsewhere" 

W.2ISt&W.22dStS. 

Near Sixth Ave. 

New York 



Buy China and Glass Right 



A school book agent has collected a lot 
of gems in- the shape of letters from mothers 
to teachers. Here are a few specimens : 

"Miss : Frank could not come those 

3 weeks because he had amonia and infor- 
mation of the vowels." 

"Teacher : John says you want to see me. 
I have a beer saloon and 9 children. Busi- 
ness is good in morning and afternoon. How 
can I come?" 

"Miss : Please let Willie come home 

at 2 o'clock. I take him out for a little 
pleasure to see his grandfather's grave." 
■ — Exchange. 



NOW DEPOSITED IN THE BANK 

$75,000.00 

IN CASH GIVEN AWAY. 

To arouse interest in, and to advertise the 
GREAT ST. LOUIS WORLD'S FAIR, 

this enormous sum will be distributed. 

full information will be sent you ABSO- 

LUTELY FREE. Just send your 

name and address on a postal card and 

•we will send you full particulars. 

World's Fair Contest Co., 

108 N. 8th Street 
St. Louis, Mo. 



A Fountain Pen 

has become a necessity with every busi- 
ness man. You can get a 

Laughlin 

Fountain 

Pen 

Made by the Laughlin Manufacturing Co. 
Detroit, Michigan 

For 2 Yearly Subscrip- 
tions to RECREATION 



And you can get these 2 subscriptions in 
20 minutes, any day. 

The Laughlin is one of the best pens in 
the market, and thousands of them are in 
daily use. 

There is no reason why you should be 
without one. 

Sample Copies of RECREATION 

for use in Canvassing- 

Furnished on Application 

Free: — To any person sending a new 
yearly subscription to Recreation through 
me I will send a fine Nickel Folding Drink- 
ing Cup and Dog Whistle, listed at 60 cents, 
or a hard rubber, water proof Match Safe, 
listed at 50 cents, or a Canvas Belt with 
loops, listed at 60 cents, or a Revolver 
Leather Holster Belt, listed at 50 cents, or 
a choice of a Horn Whistle or Star Vest 
Pocket W 7 histle, or a Duck, Snipe, Turkey 
or Echo Call, each listed at 50 cents, or a 
Rifle Cleaning Rod, 22 or 32, with scratch 
and bristol brush, listed at 50 cents, or a 
choice of a Dandy, Star or Perfect Oiler, 
very fine and handy, and each guaranteed 
not to leak, listed at 50 cents each, or a 
Powder or Shot Measure, listed at 35 cents, 
or a coin Money Purse, genuine soft kid, 
three compartments, listed at 50 cents, or a 
Money Pouch, made of fine sheep skin, with 
draw string, very fine, listed at 75 cents, 
or a self-closing rubber Tobacco Pouch, 
listed at 50 cents, or a high grade French 
Brier Pipe, listed at 75 cents, or a Fountain 
Pen, listed at 75 cents, or a lightning Fish 
Scaler, or a spring lock Hook Shield, or a 
Spring Gun Cleaner, or a Rubber Hook 
Shield, or a Little Giant Small bore Rifle 
Cleaner. 

Edward Jacobs, 227 Mulberry St., Coshoc- 
ton, O. 

■ jnu i.u i «, » .i i i i w i 11 ,11. , a waOSB—BBBBPP— O—WPPP'"'^ 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN-* 
TION RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



xxin 



ANOTHER MILITARY GAME PRE- 
SERVE. 
There are several thousand acres in this 
reservation, abounding in rabbits, bob- 
whites, squirrels, and, in .season, snipe, 
ducks and geese. I have never before seen 
so much bird life in one place. Have 
noted some 75 varieties this spring, and 
have little time to look for birds. 

No shooting is permitted on the reser- 
vation, even during the open season. Con- 
sequently we are little affected by game 
laws or by the doings of the sportsmen of 
the state. Poachers on the reservation are 
the only game hogs we run across. All 
we can do to them is to put them off, pos- 
sibly confiscating their guns. The civil au- 
thorities cannot do anything in the case, 
having no jurisdiction. Even if the federal 
courts have power to act, it is not likely 
that the military authorities would be will- 
ing to appeal to them. It is so much sim- 
pler to keep poachers off by mounted pa- 
trols of the guard than to drag .them be- 
fore any civil authorities, that the former 
modus operandi is invariably adopted. 
Thus you see we have here a fairly effec- 
tive game preserve ; but that we have little 
or no influence on the general question of 
the preservation of game in the state. 

While stationed at Montgomery, Ala., 
I tried to impress on the minds of those 
around me, by force of example and by 
tactful argument, the importance of the 
work of the League, and had the satisfac- 
tion of seeing several sportsmen voluntarily 
set limits to their bags and honestly live up 
to their new principles. 

I shall try to interest my friends and see 
if w 7 e cannot send from here to other West- 
ern posts student officers who w 7 ill try to 
have their new posts converted into game 
preserves similar to this. 

R. R. Raymond, 
Captain Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. 
Fort Leavenworth, Kans. 



The Tourist of the Future, en route — 
Lemme know when you near Toledo. 

Conductor — Passed it 34 seconds ago. 

Tourist — What time do we reach Adrian? 

Conductor — You'll have to speak a little 
quicker, my friend. That's Adrian back 
there. 

Tourist — Next town is Sturgis, isn't it? 

Conductor — It was. It isn't now. 

Tourist — Then its South Bend, I suppose? 

Conductor — You are a slow supposer. 
We passed South Bend 3 seconds back. 

Tourist — What are we stopping for? 

Conductor — Chicago ! — Milwaukee Free 
Press. 



I have received the H. & R. revolver 
which you sent me as a premium and find 
it just as represented. It is an excellent 
weapon. Thank you for your prompt at- 
tention, 

^ ^Walter 0, Emriek, Hamilton, Ohio, 



The Beer 
of Quality 




Pabst 

Blue Ribbon 



The Beer 
of Quality 




Pabst 

Blue Ribb on 



The Beer 
of Quality 




xxiv RECREATION. 



A GOOD NIGHT'S REST 



is absolutely essential to the pleasure 
and profit of every camping trip. 
Here is a way to make this easy 



For 4 Yearly Subscriptions to 

RECREATION 

I will send you a FOLDING CANVAS 
COT that weighs only about 10 pounds and 
which you can roll up with your blankets 
without adding materially to the bulk. 

You can sleep as comfortably on one of 
these cots in camp, as you can at home on a 
brass bedstead, with woven spring and hair 
mattress. 

I have but a few of these cots in hand 
and when this supply is exhausted this offer 
will be withdrawn. 



Send for package of Sample Copies for use in 

canvassing 

Recreation w es t $2* st., New York 



RECREATION. 



XXV 




and get a better smoke 



We promise to 
send you cigars 
that exactly fit ; 
cigars to fill 
EVERT desire of 
your taste. 



OUR GUARANTEE— All cigars we ship are 
guaranteed to please you, and if from any 
cause they do not do so, we will exchange 
cigars with you or refund your full purchase 
price, charging nothing for those you may 
have smoked if not satisfactory. Transpor- 
tation each way at our expense. 



We promise not 
to charge you 
more than HALF 
WHAT YOU 
WOULD PAT for 
the same qual- 
ities at retail. 



We promise that if you don't think we have filled both promises your experiment COSTS 
YOU NOTHING. 

We prepay all transportation charges 



Try us today. Our guarantee goes with every Shipment, 
an unlimited variety. 



We suggest here only a few of 



Or for 75 cents we will gladly 
send you an assortment of 12 
cigars, each separately wrap- 
ped and described, showing 
four varieties of 10 cent and 
two for a quarter values; or 
for 50 cents an equal showing 
of High-Grade 5 cent and 10 
cent values. Send for our 
illustrated catalog, "Rolled 
Reveries," which explains 
everything. 

Save half your cigar money 

E you smoke 5c. cigars, why not smoke 10c. cigars at the same 
cosi .. If a 10c. smoker, cut your expense in two. 

Indianapolis, Ind.— "Please send me 100 El Provost Perfectos. I have 
been out for some time and have had the misfortune to try the dealers, to my 
sorrow, and hare some cigars for sale cheap. I am done with experiment- 



Illustration 

A Clear Havana, 2 for 2?c suggestion. FICONCI0S, i 1-2 
in. Concha3, box of 12, $1.00; 25, $1.75j 50, $3.50. 

A Clear Favana filler ~r>d Sumatra wrapper, 
10c aiu 2 or 25c. suggestion. EL PROVOST, 
4 3-4 in. Perfectos, box of 12, 85c; 25, $1.50: 
50, $3.00 •■ or 

Try one of the popular 10c. brands. 
LA 3IEDALLA, 4 1-2 in. Conchas, 
bOiof 12, 70c; 25, $1.25; 50, $2.50. 



-W. L. Jacobs. 



Don't delay longer. Write today to 

JOHN B. ROGERS & COMPANY 

"THE PIONEERS" 

65 Jaryis St., Binghamton, N. T. 



IF I SHOULD DIE. 
If I should die to-night, 
And you should come to my cold corpse 

and say, 
Weeping and heartsick, o'er my lifeless 
clay — 
If I should die to-night, 
And you should come in deepest grief and 

woe, 
And say : "Here is that ten dollars that I 
owe," 
I might arise in my large, white cravat, 
And say, "What's that?" 

If I should die to-night, 
And you should come to my cold corpse 

and kneel, 
Clasping the bier to show the grief you 
feel, 
I say, if I should die to-night, 
And you should come to me, and there and 

then 
Just even hint 'bout paying me that ten, 
I might arise the while, 
But I'd drop dead again. 

— Ben King. 



First Fiend — That auto of mine doesn't 
go fast enough. 

Second Fiend — What's the matter? 

Several victims have complained that 
they knew what struck them, which means 
a lingering death. And I am not cruel. — 
Life. 



Club 

Cocktails 



Famous the world 
over for purity. 
They never vary. 
The secret of their 
perfect blend is that 
they are kept six 
months before being 
drawn off and bot- 
tled. Be sure you 
have them in your 
camp, on the yacht, 
and on your outing 
trips wherever you 
go. They are ready and require no 
mixing. Simply pour over cracked ice. 




For Sale by all Fancy Grocers and Dealers 



Q. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO. 

29 BROADWAY, II. T. HARTFORD, CORK. 



xxvi RECREATION. 



Do You Want a Good, Reliable, 
Substantial, Well Made 

Single Barrel 

SHOT GUN 

If so, send me 

5 Yearly Subscriptions 

and I will send you an Acme 
listed at $8, as a premium 

It is made by the DAVENPORT ARMS CO., 
and this means it is made of good material and that 
only good workmanship is put on it. 

This is one of the many remarkable opportunities 
RECREATION is offering to men and boys to fit 
themselves out completely for shooting and fishing. 



Sample Copies for Use in Canvassing 
Furnished on Application 



Address 



RECREATION 

23 W. 24tti St. New YorR City 



RECREATION. 



XXVll 



A Smart Aleck newspaper reporter of 
Altoona, Pa., printed a story about 2 Hunt- 
ingdon men whom he said had been trout 
fishing and had returned with 83 and 78 
trout, respectively. The legal limit of trout, 
under the Pennsylvania law, is 50 a day for 
each man, which is at least twice as many 
as any man should take. A warden went 
after the men on a charge of violating the 
law. They told him there was nothing in 
the report ; that they had not been fishing 
at all. The warden then looked up the re- 
porter and he admitted it was all a joke. 

"Then," said the warden, "you will have 
to go before a magistrate and swear that 
you lied, and that these men did nothing 
of the sort, or I shall arrest you for vio- 
lating the law which provides a punishment 
for the purveyor of false and misleading 
information." 

The reporter reluctantly went before a 
justice, made the necessary affidavit and es- 
caped further punishment. He will prob- 
ably not think it so funny to lie about his 
neighbors in future. 



Old Mother Hubbard 

She went out and rubbered. 
New neighbors were just moving in. 

"I'll just take a peep. 

My ! their furniture's cheap !" 
She said, with a satisfied grin. 

— Chicago Tribune. 



Blistered 
Hands 

are cooled and healed 
with 





" The Old Family Doctor." 
Soreness from fatigue or over 
exercise is dissipated and the 
muscles made quick and ac- 
tive by a thorough rubbing 
with Pond's Extract, which 
is now deemed a necessity in 
every athlete'^ outfit. 

Sold only in sealed bottles under buff Ivrapper 

ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTE 



For Hunters, Anglers, Prospectors, Ranchmen, 



The Press Buttpn Knife 

IS THE THING. 

A single pressure of the button opens it. It locks open, cannot 
close on the fingers, saves the finger nails, has 2 blades hand-forged 
from Wardlow's best English steel, and is in every respect as good 
a knife as can be made. Ladies' and Gentlemen's sizes in Stag 
Shell or Ivory handles, including moisture-proof Chamois case 
6ecurely mailed to any address for 75 CENTS, 

Send for catalogue K for description and prices of other styles. 



NATIQNAL 

CUTLERY 

COMPANY 



And all others who go 
into the Woods or Hills 

Our 5-inch Press Button Hunt- 
ing Knife can not be excelled. 
Can be opened with one hand, 
and will not open or close acci- 
dentally. 

Handsome Stag: Handle 



Price, 90c 




XXV1U 



RECREATION. 



For Convenience and Comfort 

When Shooting or Fishing 

Every Sportsman Should Have 

A Knit Jacket 




I 



Send me Five Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation 

and get a jacket, such as shown in cut herewith, 
and which will fit you and keep you warm 



Sample Copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request, address 

RECREATION 

23 WEST 24th ST., NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



XXIX 



Free: — To any person sending me $i. for 
i new yearly subscription to Recreation, 
I will send a deck of the celebrated golf 
playing cards. 

For 2 subscriptions, a fine artificial 
minnow listed at $i, or a spool of 50 
yards of Kingfisher No. 5 silk casting 
line listed at 75 cents. 

For 6 subscriptions, a lancewood cast- 
ing pole, length 5 feet, with middle joint 
convenient length for carrying, and fine 
agate tip. This is a pole that can always 
be depended on as it is made of selected 
stock. List price, $5.50. Arthur W. 
Bruce, 508 Woodward Avenue, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 



I hasten to thank you for the beautiful 
Bristol rod you had sent me by the manu- 
facturers. I am almost ashamed to ac- 
cept so handsome a present for the few 
hours I spent in securing 5 subscribers to 
Recreation, a magazine which should be 
in the hands of every lover of nature. A 
friend on seeing my rod, decided at once 
to try for one. He already has 3 names and 
doubtless will have the 5 before the week's 
end. I wish long life and prosperity to 
Recreation and its fearless editor. 

C. A. Laurens, Worcester, Mass. 



At the Columbus shoot, Columbus, Neb., 
W. D. Townsend, shooting a Parker gun, 
scored 96 out of 100, tying for second place 
in competition for the $100 hammerless gun. 
W. D. Townsend won the gold medal event 
with a score of 49 out of 50. Mr. G. A. 
Schroeder tied with him on the first 25 
straight, Mr. Townsend winning in the 
shoot off. Both of these gentlemen shoot 
the Parker gun. 



"Don't you wish you were as smart as 
Conan Doyle's detective?" 

"My dear sir," replied the modern detec- 
tive, "if they'd let me plan the crimes in 
the first place I could discover the facts in 
ways quite as extraordinary as those of any 
detective that an author ever put in a book." 
— Chicago Post. 



I received the Poco camera which I 
earned as a premium for subscriptions to 
Recreation and will try to get some more 
subscriptions as soon as I can. I like Rec- 
reation very much. Please accept my 
thanks for the camera. 

Frank O. Graves, Buffalo Gap, Tex. 



I have taken Recreation a long time and 
I know it is the best magazine of its kind 
printed. . I do some hunting myself, and 
next to going to the woods for a day's 
hunt I enjoy reading Recreation. 

H. O. Cook, Harrisburg, Pa. 



"He is a fool who thinks by force or skill 
To turn the current of a woman's will." 

— Samuel Tuke. 



UNDERWEAR 




fl StaHmait Dresser Crunk 

KEEPS YOUR CLOTHING 
FLAT AND SMOOTH 

Everything in reach, No heavy trays, but light, easy jun« 
ning drawers. Holds as much and costs no more than a good 
box trunk. Hand riveted, almost indestructible. Once tried, 
always recommended. Sent C O. D., privilege examina* 
tion. 2C stamp for catalogue, Mention RECREATION, 

F. A. STALLMAN 

87 W. Spring St. Columbus, O. 



xxx RECREATION. 



Are You an 

Amateur 

Photographer? 




If so would you like a Camera 
that will photograph 




A whole range of mountains 

A whole sweep of river 

A whole army 

A whole fleet of ships 

A whole city 

Of any other vast stretch of scenery or moving 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT 

R\ Yista 

is the thing. It lists at $30 



One of the greatest inventions of the age* 
Given as a premium for \ 2 subscriptions. 



For particulars address 

RECREATION 

23 West 24th Street NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



XXXI 



MOUNTAIN SONGSTERS. 

FRANK WHITE. 

It is out here in the mountains 

That the burros sing their song; 
The melody's not the sweetest, 

But then it's loud and long; 
It echoes from the hilltops 

To the valleys far below, 
It is music to the miner 

As he toils along so slow. 

These meek and lowly burros, 

When you turn them out at night, 
Will feed around your camp fire, 

And you think that they're all right. 
But get up in the morning, 

In the grew of early dawn, 
And on looking for your burros 

You will find the critters gone. 

Then you start out to hunt them 

On a raw and foggy morn. 
Hark! No, that's not Shorty; 

Must be Gabriel with his horn. 
A mile away you lose their trail, 

But other weary miles you tramp, 
Till, wet and hungry, mad clear through, 

You wander sadly back to camp. 

Then, while you cook your breakfast 

You have lots of time to swear; 
You curse those wandering burros 

And damn their bones and hides and hair. 
Then you hear the rocks a-clicking, 

Footsteps pattering just behind 
Make you look up. Hello, Shorty. 

Jerry, here's your bacon rind. 



The Recreation water proof match box, 
Marble safety axe and Ideal hunting knife 
have been received. I am delighted with 
the beautiful articles. It is not only a 
pleasure to receive the splendid premiums, 
but a good pastime to solicit subscriptions, 
which I find easy for such a worthy maga- 
zine. Have more to send you shortly. 

J. C. Low, Philadelphia. 



As a constant reader of Recreation, I 
wish to express my admiration for the 
manner in which you read the riot act to the 
game hogs. I hope you will slaughter them 
all, and serve them up to your readers from 
time to time, with a dash of Tabasco sauce, 
garnished with lettuce and stuffed olives,. 
Mrs. C. Denelsbeck, Ozone Park, L. I. 



The handsome Bristol rod which you sent 
me as a premium arrived O. K. I am more 
than pleased with it. I do not see how 
you can give such valuable premiums for 
so few subscriptions. Every one is highly 
pleased with Recreation. 

R. G. Lindley, Dinuba, Cal. 



"Have you any stove lifters?" 
"You will find the derrick department in 
the basement." — Yonkers Statesman. 



From Grape 
to Glass 

Every step in the process of 
making, aging and bottling 

Great 

Western 

Champagne 

is done on our own premises 
by experts. We know it is 
an absolutely pure and per- 
fectly healthful wine. 

''Of the six American 
Champagnes exhibit- 
ed at the Paris expo- 
sition of 1900, the 
CHEAT WESTERN 
we^s tne only one 
that received a GOLD 
MEDAL." 

Pleasant Valley Wine Co. 

Sole Makers, Rheims, N. Y. 

Sold by respectable wine dealers everywhere 




/f 



=D 



Hotel 



} 



Cumberland 

Broadway at 54$ St* 
New YorL 

THE most luxuriously furnished Hotel 
in New York. Finest specimens of 
Oriental rugs throughout, mahogany fur- 
niture and rich draperies. 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF. 

Ideal location; near principal theatres 
and shops and in plain view of Central 
Park. Within one minute's walk of Sixth 
Ave. Elevated Road, and accessible to all 
car lines of the Metropolitan surface roads. 

Transient rates, with bath, $2.50 per 
day and upward. 

The most beautiful restaurant in New 
York. Fine music. 
r Excellent food and sensible prices. 



Sunday Evening Table d'Hote Dinner^ 

6 to 8:30 - - $1.00. 

Souvenirs Every Sunday Evening. 



%s 



EDWARD R. SWE1T. Proprietor. 



=DC= 



■J 



RECREATION. 



255 PERPETUAL PENCILS 



ARE 

ALWAYS 
S M ARP 



Agents' Proposition 
B3 on request. 



PENCIL AND 33 LEADS .... 
At dealers or sent POSTPAID FOR 



25c, 



AMERICAN LEAD PENCIL CO. 

66 East Washington Sq., New York 

and London, Eng. 




Tfte Chicago College of Denial Surgery 

Founded in 1880. 2106 Graduates. Has continued 
under the management of its founders since its organization 
and offers unsurpassed facilities to dental students. For 
announcement address Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, 
Dean, 775 W. Harrison St., Chicago. 



AIR BRUSH 




FOR 

ART WORK. 



We are making and selling the 
best Art Tool in use. Applies 
color by jet of air, enabling the 
artist to do better work and save 
time. No studio complete with- 
out it. Circulars free. Mention 
Recreation. Address 

Air Brush Mfg. Co. 

126 Nassau St., Rocliford, 111., U.S.A. 



Temple-Clasps 



IF YOU VALUE 

YOUR EYES 

write for our free book 
"Eye Logic." It tells all 
about the only glasses that 
don't pinch the nose, don't 
pull the ears, don't make 
your head ache and don't 
fall off. It also tells how 
you can really help your 

sight. It is FREE. 

I Briggs Optical Co., 104, Triangle Blilg., Rochester, N. X. 




Never Hurt 



A BACHELOR'S BLUNDER. 

BERT THORNDYKE. 

A light canoe, just room for 2, 

Upon a shady stream — 
One pretty girl, a priceless pearl, 

Her age was just 19. 

A muslin dress, a dark brown tress, 

Two dainty, pouting lips, 
A look so shy, a lingering sigh, 

Mingled with paddle dips. 

The heart is caught, the ring is bought, 
He breaks up his bachelor's hall ; 

A cottage there, a happy pair — 
Only a summer's dream, that's all. 




District of Columbia, Washington— (Suburbs) 

National Park Seminary FoR YouNG WOMEN . 

Eleven buildings, Beautiful Grounds. No examinations — Re- 
views substituted. $500 to $600. Sight-seeing every Monday. 
"It's a liberal education to live in Washington." For illustrated 
catalogue, address Seminary Box 136, Forest Glen, Md. 



Councilman Edward Johnson, who is the cham- 
pion wing shot of South Jersey, accompanied by 
Dan Copp, of 19th and South streets Philadel- 
phia, has returned from a shooting trip at Brig- 
antine with one of the best records ever made on 
the Atlantic coast. They report that they killed 
554 birds in 3 hours. Councilman Johnson de- 
clared they might have made the figures 1,000 had 
their shells not given out. The game includes 
yellow legs, plovers and robin snipe. — New Jersey 
paper. 

The above report is correct. 

Daniel J. Copp, Phila., Pa. 

It, therefore, proves that you and Johnson 
are entitled to the honor of being enrolled 
in the American Game Hog Register. Your 
number is 1042, and Johnson's is 1043. — 
Editor. 



Lady Customer — I would like to buy a 
muff. 

Gentlemanly Clerk — Certainly ma'am; 
what fur? 

Lady Customer — I don't know that it's 
any of your business, but I want it to 
keep my hands warm. Tableau. — Baltimore 
News. 



THE 

FOUR-TRACK 
NEWS 

An Illustrated Magazine 
of Travel and Education 

MORE THAN 152 PAGES MONTHLY 

Its scope and character are indicated by 
the following titles of articles that have 
appeared in recent issues; all pro- 
fusely illustrated. 

Among Golden Pagodas, 

Marblehead, ... 

A Study in Shells, - 

Santo Domingo, 

Eleven Hours of Afternoon, 

A Gala Night on the Neckar, 

Echoes From Sleepy Hollow, 

Golf in the Rockies, - 

In Barbara Freitchie's Town, 

Back of the Backwoods, 

A Feast of Music, 

Sailors' Snug Harbor, 

Since Betty Golfs — Poem, Josephine Wilhelm Hard 

Niagara's Historic Environs, -" - Eben P. Dorr 

In the Old Wood-Burner Days, fames O. Whittemore 

The Land of Liberty and Legends, 

Guy Morrison Walker 

Earl W. Mayo 

George Hyde Preston 

Minnie J. Reynolds 

Charlotte Philip 

Alexander Porter 

- Isabel R. Wallach 

William Wait 



Kirk Munroe 

M. Imlay Taylor 

Dr. R. W. Shu/eldt 

- Frederick A. Ober 

Cy Warman 

Kathleen L. Greig 

Minna Irving 

Henry Russell Wray 

Thomas C. Harbaugh 

Charles Howard Shinn 

Jane W. Guthrie 

Bessie H. Dean 



Nature's Treasure-house, 
Down the Golden Yukon, 
Corral and Lasso, 
Little Histories : 

An Historic Derelict, 

Where Lincoln Died, 

The Poets' Corner, 

The Treason House, 

SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS,or soCENTS A YEAR 
Can be had of newsdealers, or by addressing 
George H. Daniels, Publisher, 
Room No. 48 7 East 42d Street, New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 



WASH THE OSTERMOOR 




Should the tick of an Ostermoor Mattress become soiled through any cause, soap, 
brush and water will cleanse it thoroughly, and will not hurt the filling, because it is 
non-absorbent. Dried in the sun it is absolutely unharmed. If preferred, ticking is 
very readily taken off to wash, the sheets of Ostermoor Filling remain intact and can 
not become displaced, and remain sweet, pure and clean. 

Ostermoor Mattress $ 15. 

is far better for health, comfort and economy than the very best of hair — some people don't even 
want hair; in fact, the straw mattresses they have are good enough, and letting "good enough" 
alone has been their motto through life. That wouldn't satisfy you who seize all the comforts 
obtainable, and then long for those beyond your reach. That's human life, of which one-third is 
sleep, and we cater to that one-third with our wonderful sleep inducer — the "Ostermoor" — which, 
unlike hair, is built, not stuffed, contains eight layers of Ostermoor Sheets enclosed in tick by 
hand — softer, sweeter, cleaner, purer, and far more evenly elastic than hair — and stays so, as the 
Ostermoor is practically un-wear-out-able; first cost, unlike hair, is last and only cost; it never 
lumps, mats or packs, or needs recovering. ( 



STANDARD SIZES AND PRICES 



2 feet G inchee wide, . 25 lbs., 

3 feet wide, . . .30 lbs., 

3 feet 6 inches wide, . 35 lbs., 

4 feet wide, . . .40 lbs., 
4 feet 6 inches wide, . 45 lbs., 



$8.35 
10.00 
11. TO 
IS. 85 
15.00 



ALL 

6 FEET 

3 INCHES 

LONG. 



EXPRESS CHARGES PREPAID. 



In two parts, 50 cents extra. 



Special sizes at special prices. 



30 Nights' Free Trial 

Sleep on the "Ostermoor" thirty nights free and 
if it is not even all you have hoped for, if you 
don't believe it to be the equal in cleanliness, dura- 
bility and comfort of any $50. hair mattress ever 
made, you can get your money back by return 
mail — "no questions asked." 



OUR 136-PAGE BOOK IS FREE 

Mailed on postal card request. "The Test of Time" is printed in two 
colors, contains 250 beautiful illustrations, heaviest plate paper. Probably the 
most expensive book issued for advertising purposes. May we send it to you ? 

Look Out! Dealers are trying to sell the " just-as-good " kind. Ask to see the name 
"Ostermoor" and our trade-mark label sewn on the end. Show them you can't and won't be 
fooled. "It must be Ostermoor.' 1 '' Mattresses expressed, prepaid by us, same day check is received. 

OSTERMOOR & COMPANY, 114 Elizabeth St.. New York 

Canadian Agency: The Alaska Feather and Down Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 




RECREATION. 



GOING into CAM? 

If so, you will need 

A TENT 

You can get one big enough for 4 men 
and their camp outfit, by sending me 

8 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

at $1 each. You can get another tent 
big enough for 6 men by sending me 

10 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

at $1 each. 



Why pay out money for a tent when you can 
make your friends pay for it? 

Sail in and fit yourself for your summer 
vacation. 

This is a great opportunity, and will hold good 
for only a few weeks. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in can- 
vassing furnished on application. 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 




Varicocele 
Hydrocele 



Cured to Stay Gured in 5 Days* 
No Cutting or Pain B Guaranteed 
Cure or Money Refunded* 

mmm OMg%g%g%FM C Under my treatment this insidi- 
w Jf\KM%0%J%0^MmELm ous disease rapidly disappears. 
Pain ceases almost instantly. The stagnant blood is driven 
from the dilated veins and all soreness and swelling sub- 
sides. Every indication of Varicocele vanishes and in its 
stead comes the pleasure of perfect health. Many ailments 
are reflex, originating from other diseases. For instance, 
innumerable blood and nervous diseases result from poison- 
ous taints'in the system. Varicocele and Hydrocele, if neg- 
H i Tit m n lected will undermine physical strength, depress the mental 

<r«. u j. c \ .', J'LL"TSON, m. D. faculties, derange the nervous system, and ultimately pro- 

TM Master Specialist of Chicago, who Cures Varicocele, duce complicated results. In treating diseases of men I 
Hydrocele, and treats patients personally. always cure the effect as well as the cause. I desire that 

Established 1880. every person afflicted with these or allied diseases write me 

( Copibighted ) so j can explain my method of cure, which is safe and per- 

manent. My consultation will cost you nothing, and my charges for a perfect cure will be reasonable and 
not more than you will be willing to pay for the benefits conferred. 

Pofft/aifl/l/ n§ Cui*£* * s wnat y° u want. I give a legal guaranty to cure or refund your money. 
l#tr#^t«»»#»ajr %»* %0mMM *g what I have done for others I can do for you. I can cure you at home 

Correspondence Confidential. &££S^V&t$&i&!$££L 

dition fully, and you will receive in plain envelope a scientific and honest opinion of your case, Free of 
charge. My home treatment is successful. My books and lectures mailed free upon application. 

H. J.TILLOTSOIN, M.D.,140 Tillotson Bldg, 84 Dearborn St., CHICAGO 



SOME IOWA ROOTERS ON THE 
RAMPAGE. 

J. W. Allington, who went to Lost Island Lake 
about 10 days ago, on a hunting expedition, re- 
turned home yesterday. He has some great duck 
stories to unfold and brought home the goods to 
prove his assertions. Bill says he and 4 others 
killed 514 ducks in 4 days. He had 200 of the 
birds spread out on his counter yesterday and 
it was the largest assortment of wild ducks ever 
exhibited by a hunter in Webster City. 

The Freeman-Tribune can testify to the quality 
of the birds, as Mr. Allington kindly remembered 
the printer with a generous donation. — Webster 
City, Iowa, paper. 

Here is Allington's shameless brag: 

In answer to yours of the 6th, will say 
we bagged 514 ducks in 4 days. There 
were 6 in the party, but only 4 shooting at 
a time from the blind. If we had wished 
to we could have killed twice that number. 
I never saw such a flight of ducks in my 
life, and never expect to see the like again. 
Respectfully yours, 

J. W. Allington. 

This is one of the disgusting and weary- 
ing kind of reports that come to this office 
regularly. A man or several men go out 
and slaughter a lot of game or fish, then 
take a batch of the spoils to the editor of 
the local paper and he slops over with 
laudations of the swine. The chances are 
that if a man should steal a sheep from 
an Iowa farmer and give the same editor 
a leg, the editor would applaud the thief 
for his skill and wariness. 



There are laws on the statute books of 
most states to punish a man for compound- 
ing a felony and one of these days we shall 
have to incorporate that same principle in 
our game laws. Then when an editor 
commends men for making hogs of them- 
selves he can be led into court and made 
to pay for his fulsome effusion. — Editor. 



Papa : How did you get your clothes so 
terribly torn? 

Tommy : Tryin' to keep a little boy from 
bein' licked. 

"Ah, a brave deed ! Who was the little 
boy?" 

"Me."— Chicago Daily News. 

Take no chances 
with your face. Al- 
ways demand Will- 
iams' Shaving Soap. 

Williams' Shaving Sticks and Tablets sold every- 
where. Free trial sample for 2 -cent stamp to pay 
postage. Write for booklet, "How to Shave.' ' 

The J, B. Williams Co., Glastonbury, Conn, 



XXXVI 



RECREATION. 



A VALUABLE PRESENT 

For Your Wile, Your Mother, Your 
Sister or Your Best Girl 

For 25 Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation, I will send you 
a set of 

1 DISH AND 12 
TOMATO PLATES 

made by Higgins & Seiter, 50 West 22d Street, N. Y. Listed at 

$19.50. 

And, for 20 Yearly Subscrip- 
tions to Recreation, I will send 
you a set of 

12 WATERMELON 
PLATES 



listed at $16.50. (See illustration) 




T 



HESE are fine, thin, white 
china plates, beautifully hand 
painted, with pictures of tomatoes 
and tomato vines, or watermelons 
and watermelon vines, in natural 
colors, and each set of plates is 
enclosed in a case made in an exact 
imitation of a large tomato or a 
watermelon. 

No more beautiful or appropriate present could possibly be 
found for a lady than one of these sets. 

You can earn one of them in a few hours, and at the same time 
earn the everlasting gratitude of the lady to whom you may give it. 

SEND FOR PACKAGE OF SAMPLE COPIES FOR USE IN CANVASSING 

Recreation w. z^st^t, New York 



RECREATION. 



xxxvu 



Webber's Hand=Knit Jackets 

Look for Webber's name on 
Collar Band. 

(Nos. 14 and 4 represent 
my latest.) 

These jackets are made of 
best zephyr yarn and very soft 
and elastic. Strictly hand-made 
and fashioned to fit the form. 
Our records show that five 
jackets of every twenty sold are 
ordered by doctors. Why ? 
Health requires a garment of 
this kind on many occasions. 
Packing wont injure it or spoil 
its appearance. Suitable for 
camping, hunting, golf and out- 
ing of every kind. Any color. 

Suggest navy, oxford grey, tan or myrtle green. Price each- 
$6.50; Men's $7.00. Sizes 46 and 48 $1,00 extra. 




No. 14 for Ladies. 
Notice the Pockets. 




No. 4 for Men. 




-Ladies' 



medium heavy oxford 
grey, tan and navy, each 



Hunting Jacket, 

A 1 q c\z~ €3k 1 d C*\f &£ extra neav v lined pockets, ox- 



ford, tan, black and scarlet, each 



$4.00 
$5.00 



SCARLET FOR DEER HUNTING— ORDER NOW 

If your dealer does not handle them send me the price and I will send you a jacket, express prepaid, and if not 
satisfactory, return the jacket and I will return your money. Write for illustrated catalogue. Mention Recreation 

Geo. F. Webber, Manufacturer, Station A, Detroit, Mich. 



We find it hard to wait from one month 
to the next for our copies of Recreation. 
If it comes to a choice of losing Recreation 
or my 3 meals a day I generally receive 
my copy, as I would rather go hungry than 
do without Recreation. I enjoy the way 
you roast the game hogs. We have sev- 
eral of them up this way, but after I get 
them interested in Recreation I think a 
few doses will cure them. 

W. F. Girton, Coopersburg, Pa. 



"Yes, I have just returned from Cuba," 
said J. G. Connaughton, last night. "I 
brought back with me some nice presents 
for my wife. What are they? Well, a box 
of cigars, a fine Panama hat and an old 
Spanish pipe. 

"Do I think she will enjoy such presents? 
Well, why not? Last Christmas she gave 
me a bottle of perfume, a fur muff and a 
lady's diamond ring." — Louisville Herald. 



The piano arrived O. K. and is all right. 
Wing and Son treated me handsomely and 
everything is just what I wanted. Your 
premium offer was a golden opportunity 
for me. I wish Recreation all success it 
deserves. I wish I could get it into the 
hands of more would-be sportsmen. It is 
no trouble to get a genuine sportsman to 
read it and subscribe. 
-^ T. E. Kinney, Conway Springs, Kans. 



FOR 



Solid Comfort 

SUMMER or WINTER 



The 
Best 



is 



the 
Cheapest 




Get a pair of 

Thompson 
Quimby 

Hunting 
Boots 



I Make the Best 

All work guaranteed. I refer by per- 
mission to the Editor of Recreation. 
Measurement blanks and prices on ap- 
plication. Mention Recreation. <* 

T. H. GUTHRIE 

33 William St. NEWARK, N. J. 



XXXV111 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 



A Book, a Gun, a Camera 
A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod 
A Reel, a Tent, 



[free OF 

f COST 



Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the required number 
s obtained the premium earned will be shipped. 

TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO new yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation at $1 each, I will send a copy of 
Hunting in the Great West, cloth; or 
a Recreation Waterproof Match Box, 
made by W. L. Marble and listed at 
50c ; or a Shakespeare Revolution Bait 
listed at 75c ; or a Laughlin Fountain 
Pen ; or a dozen Trout Flies, assorted, 
listed at $1 ; or a pair of Attachable Eye- 
glass Temples, gold-plated, made by Gall 
& Lembke ; or one Rifle Wick Plug, made 
by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 
30 caliber to 50 caliber, or Shotgun Wick 
Plug, 20 gauge up to 10 gauge ; or a pair 
of chrome tanned horsehide hunting and 
driving gloves, listed at $1.50, made by 
J. P. Luther Glove Co. ; or a J. C. Hand 
trap made by the Mitchell Mfg. Co., listed 
at $4. 

THREE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
safety pocket ax, made by W. L. Marble 
and listed at $2.50 ; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 * or a pair of Shot- 
gun Wick Plugs made by Hemm & Wood- 
ward, Sidney, Ohio, 20 gauge to 10 gauge ; 
or a Polished Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, 
made by E. W. Stiles ; or a pair of gaunt- 
lets, for hunting and driving, ladies' size, 
listed at $2.50, made by J. P. Luther 
Glove Co., or a Press Button Jack Knife, 
made by The National Cutlery Co., ana 
listed at $1. 

FOUR new subscriptions at $1 each, an 
Ideal Hunting Knife, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $2.50 ; or a 32 cali- 
ber, automatic double action revolver, 
made by Harrington & Richardson Arms 
Co. ; or a Gold Medal Folding Camp Bed, 
made by the Gold Medal Camp Furniture 
Co. 

FIVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a copy 
of Cruisings in the Cascades, cloth; or 
an Ideal Hunting Knife made by W. L. 
Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a pair of 
lock lever skates, made by Barney & 
Berry, listed at $4.50; or a Bristol Steel 

y Fishing Rod, listed at $(> or less; or a 
Knit Hunting Coat, made by the Blauvelt 
Knitting Co., and listed at $6; or a set of 
convertible Ampliscopes (5 lenses), listed 
at $5. 

SIX new subscriptions at $1 each, a Hawk- 
eye Refrigerating Basket made by the Bur- 
lington Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka 
golf balls listed at $4 ; or a Pocket Poco 
B 314x414, made by the Rochester Op- 
tical Co., listed at $9. 



SEVEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
copy of The Big Game of North America, 
or of The American Book of the Dog, 
cloth, or one set Lakewood golf clubs, 
5 in number, listing at $5 ; or a series 
11F Korona Camera, made by the Gund- 
lach Optical Co., listed at $10. 

EIGHT new subscriptions at $1 each. A 
series 1, 4 x 5 Korona Camera, made by 
the Gundlach Optical Co., listed at $12, 
or an Acme single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $8. 

TEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4.50 ; or a Water- 
proof Wall Tent 7x7, made by Aber- 
crombie & Fitch, and listed at $8 ; or a 
Rough Rider rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $12 ; or a pair of! Opera Glasses made 
by Gall & Lembke and listed at $10. 

TWELVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Davenport Ejector Gun, listed ar $10, or 
a Cycle Poco No. 3, 4x5, made by the 
Rochester Optical Co., listed at $15 . 

FIFTEEN new subscriptions, $1 each, a 
Shakespeare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at 
$15 ; or a set of rabbit plates made by 
Higgins & Seiter, and listed at $8 ; or 
a Field Glass made by Gall & Lembke ; 
or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, complete, 
with canvas cover, listed at $10 ; or a 
Bulls-Eye rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co.. and listed 
at $16 ; or a pair of horsehide hunting 
boots, listed at $10 ; or a Queen Hammock, 
made by the King Folding Canvas Boat 
Co., and listed at $15 ; or a Mullins Duck 
Boat, listed at $20. 

TWENTY new subscriptions at $1 each, 
a 14-karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, 
with Waltham Movement, listed at $20; 
or an Elita single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $18 ; 
or an Eureka Boat No. 1, Grade A, 
made by the Acme Folding Canvas Boat 
Co., and listed at $27: or a Queen Ham- 
mock, made by the King Folding Canvas 
Boat Co., and listed at $20; or a Mul- 
lins' Bustle Ducking Boat, listed at $27. 

TWENTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, an 11-foot King Folding Canvas 
Boat. 

THIRTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Waterproof Tent, 14% x 17, made by 
Abercrombie & Fitch, and listed at $25. 

THIRTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, a 14-foot King Folding Canvas Boat. 

FORTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Savage .303 Repeating Rifle; or a No. 10 
Gun Cabinet, made by the West End Fur- 
niture Co., and listed at $32. 

FIFTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. 20 Gun Cabinet, made by tbe West 
End Furniture Co., and listed at $38; 
or a Colt Automatic Pistol, made by the 
Colt's Patent Fire Arms Mfg. Co., and 
listed at $25. 

TWO HUNDRED new subscriptions at $1 
each, a strictly first class Upright Piano, 
listed at $750. 

Add^, Recreation f, 3 e ^ e y s ork 4th st< 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 



>|JB^ Touring Cars 



Endurance 
and Power 

are the keynotes to Rambler superiority. The 

Rambler won the celebrated Endurance Test 

in 1903. It won the Minneapolis Annual Hill 

Climbing Contest for the second time, on 

June 11th— 2,680 ft., 10$ grade in lm. 7 3-5s. 

Model "L," here illustrated, has 16 actual 

horse power — 84 in. wheel base — 30 in. tires. 

Sold complete with canopy top, beveled plate 

glass swinging front, four 

lamps and tube horn, $1,350. 

"Write for Rambler Catalogue; 
it explains why the Rambler is 
superior, and gives the positive 
proof of its undeniable excellence. 

Thos. B. Jetffery (8b Co. 
Kenosha,Wis.i U* S. A. 

Chicago Branch, 300 "Wabash Av. 
Boston Branch 145 Columbus Av. 



Model 

$1,350 




The car of the present 



The chariot of the past 







THE COON AND THE PUPPY. 

W. H. NELSON. 

It was Indian summer. I was the 
proud owner of a big, rollicking New- 
foundland puppy, just full grown and as 
limber and full of fun as a boy. He had 
never hunted anything except bones and 
mischief, and I wanted to see if he cculd 
be taught the mysteries of that chief de- 
light of the farmer's boy, hunting coons. 

The moon, somewhat past her first quar- 
ter, shone dimly through the smoky haze, 
lighting the woods in a ghostly way, which 
made a moving object of every stump. 
My companion, John Martin, possessed 
the hunter's instinct of location. He was 
as sure of his bearings in midnight dark- 
ness, in a strange wood, as in the narrow 
limits of his bedroom. He could climb 
an oak 3 feet in diameter and 40 feet to 
the first limb as safely and almost as 
nimbly as a bear. He could shoot a rifle 
like a Boone ; could fiddle to beat the 
band, and could lie worse than Munch- 
ausen. 

John owned a coon dog, Nero, old, but 
proud. The dogs soon left us, , and for a 
while we stalked along listening for Nero's 
tongue. Suddenly we came plump on Ma- 
jor, the puppy, sitting silent under a dog- 
wood and gazing up into the branches as if 
watching something. John paused to ex- 
amine the tree, while I insisted that the 
puppy didn't know enough to tree a coon, 



and urged my companion to come on. 
Peering up among the branches, using the 
moon as a background, John presently an- 
nounced a 'possum, and proceeded to 
climb for him, just to see what Major 
would do with him. Major sat perfect!^ 
still, watching intently, while John ad- 
vanced toward the snarling object. It 
proved to be a coon. One tremendous 
shake of the. limb and down came old 
Zip, almost under Major's nose. The dog 
had been taught to catch chickens for the 
cook without biting them, and , to hold 
them with his paws till relieved by the 
cook. This he did with the coon, but not 
long. A short yelp, and, puppylike, he 
changed ends, sitting down on his game. 
This did not work satisfactorily either, for 
the dog. The coon nailed him and he 
jumped at least 2 feet high. When he 
came down he knew what to do. One 
rush, one crunch of those powerful jaws, 
one smothered squeal from the victim, the 
muffled snapping of bones and the coon 
had paid that penalty which waits alike 
the human debtor and his brute victim. 



There was a fair maid from Decatur, 
Who was known as a red-hot potatur, 

To the jungles she went 

On mission work bent. 
Where a dozen fat savages atur! 

—Mount Morris (111.) Index. 



xi 



RECREATION. 



T0NNE4U $2,550 



LIGHT TOURING CAR $1,450 



HAY N E S 

AUTOMOBILES 




THE HIGHEST ENDORSEMENT ANY CAR EVER HAD 

The Haynes Cars have proved best every time there has been 
a test. The Official Records of American Automobile trials 
leave no room for doubt. Buy a HAYNES. Catalogue 
and full information for the asking. 

HAYNES-APPERSON COMPANY, Kokomo, Ind., U. S. A. 

(The oldest makers of Motor Cars in America.) Mem- 
bers of the Association of Licensed Auto Manufacturers. 
Branch Store: 1420 Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 

NEW YORK, - - - - Brooklyn Automobile Co., 66 W. 43 St , 

BROOKLYN, - - - Brooklyn Automobile Co., 1239 Fulton St. 

BOSTON, ------- Geo. M. Brown, 43 Columbus Ave. 

LOS ANGELES, J. A. Rosesteel 

BUFFALO, - - - - Buffalo Auto Exchange, 40 1 Franklin St. 

TOLEDO, O., - Toledo Motor Car Co. 

PHILADELPHIA, - - Rose Automobile Co., 262 No. Broad St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, Pacific States Auto Co., 2017 Ellis St. 



TO SAVE THE BIRDS. 

The Municipal League, of Greenville, an 
organization equivalent to the boards of 
trade, chambers of commerce, etc., which 
exist in most Western towns, has printed 
and posted along the streets of that city 3 
notice which reads as follows : 

"Five dollars reward will be paid for 
information leading to the conviction of 
any person shooting or trapping singing or 
insect-eating birds, or robbing their nests, 
or of any person selling song birds, as for- 
bidden in sections 546 to 550 of the criminal 
code of South Carolina. 

"Among the birds protected by the sec- 
tion are the bat, lark, whippoorwill, fly- 
catcher, warbler, finch, oriole, woodpecker, 
humming bird, blue bird, swallow, mocking 
bird, red bird, thrush, wren etc." 

The Greenville Daily News states that 
in addition to the birds mentioned in the 
foregoing notice the robin, the blue jay, the 
catbird, and in fact all the common vari- 
eties of song and insectivorous birds which 
winter in the South, are to be rigidly pro- 
tected. 

It would be well for all city improvement 
organizations, everywhere, to adopt this 
plan, and the Municipal League of Green- 
ville is to be congratulated on being the 
pioneer in this line. 



She — You kiss like an expert. 
He — You compliment like a connoisseur. 
■ — Town Topics. 



A Press Button Hunting Knife 

Is one of the best articles a hunter ever carried 




It has a 4 Inch Blade made of the Best Silver Steel 

The knife cannot come open in your pocket. It cannot close on your hand when in use. It opens and closes 
only when 

YOU PRESS THE BUTTON 

If you once use one of these knives you will never use any other. You can get one as a premium for 

3 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION 

Sample Copies furnished on request. 

RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, New York 



RECREATION. 



xii 




Length 35 ft., beam 6 ft. 3 in. 

Patterns $25.00. 

You can build this 

$1000.00 Boat for $125.00. 



BUILD YOUR OWN BOAT 

by the Brooks System, which consists of exact size 
Printed Patterns of every piece, a complete set of 
Half-Tone Working Illustrations, an itemized bill 
of all Material required and how to secure it. 

Our Instructions 
tell you how to lay 
a certain pattern 
on a particular 
piece-how to mark 
it and tut it out — 
how to nail or 
screw it in place 
with so many of 
such size nails or 
screws. We then 
give you an illustra- 
tion of each step 
of the work prop- 
erly done. 

Tt is the Twen- 
tieth Century 
method for the am- 
ateur and profes- 
sional boat builder. 
It is a form of rec- 
reation. It is a 
splendid business 
opportunity. Can 
You See It ? 

Pattern sizes 12 
to 51 ft. Prices 
from $3.00 up. Cat- 
alogue and partic- 
ulars free. For 25c 
64- page catalog- 
sheet of instruc- 
tions and working 
i llustratio ns. 
Prices quoted on 
k nock-down 
frames and com- 
pleted boats. 

BROOKS BOAT MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Originators of the Pattern System of Boat Building, 




Takes 

A 



Length 18 ft., beam 4 ft. 

Patterns $10.00. 
300 ft. Lumber and $9.00 in hard- 
ware. 

$200.00 Boat for $35.00. 



Length 16 ft., beam 4 ft. 
*TU . Patterns $5.00. 

s«i huii With 200 ft. lumber and 
kd\ iawc«> $5.00 in hardware 
you have a 

$i5o.oo Boat for 
$20.00. 




580 Ship Street, 



Bay City, Mich., U.S.A. 



A middle-aged woman once stood in 
court as a witness. Among other trivial 
questions counsel for defendant asked the 
witness to state her age. 

"Sir," said she, "I refuse to answer that 
question." 

"But you must," persisted the lawyer; 
"why won't you tell the court your age?" 

"Well," replied the witness, "my age 1 
only know by hearsay, and hearsay evidence 
is never taken in court." 



"Choose pianos for your models, 
Follow along their lines with care, 

For you will always find them 
Either upright, grand or square." 

— Nashville Men. 



Dunn — What do you think of Dauber's 
latest picture after Rubens? Brown — I 
think Rubens would be after Dauber if he 
could only see it. — Grit. 



Camper's Folium Pail 

As solid as any pail. Made of water- 
proof canvas. Folds to fit the pocket. 

Price, $1 

DUPLEX FOLDING PAIL CO. 
1X4 East 14th St., New York City. 






An 8 x /4 horse-power Cad- 
illac motor, when tested 
alter nine months ot con- 
tinuous service, devel- 
oped 10 1-4 horse-power. 
Does that kind ot broken 
promise interest you? 

It Isn't always possible to be exactly 
truthful, but there is a right way to err. 
You'll find some remarkable statements 
in the Cadillac literature, but if there's any- 
thing that isn't so, the difference is in your 
favor. We'll send you booklet K if you'll 
ask for it, and tell you where the nearest 
agency is. A ride in the Cadillac will be 
the more a revelation if you're familiar 
with other cars. Cadillacs are $750 to $900. 

Cadillac Automobile Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers. 



For several years past, the Thibault (7 
brothers, who live near White Face moun- 
tain, have been killing deer and shipping 
them in violation of law. In April last, 
State Game Commissioners Shurtleff and 
Wentworth went after these bristlebacks 
and caught them at a country dance. When 
taken into court, the Thibaults admitted the 
killing of 20 deer during the past winter, 
though the State game commissioners have 
evidence that they really killed and shipped 
over 70. 

The Thibault boys and their father were 
fined $300 .and costs, amounting in all to 
$999. It would take a lot of venison to 
bring in that much money, and it is safe to 
assume that these disreputable outlaws will 
seek some more profitable employment in 
future. 

BE COMFOR.TABLE IN CAMP 




THE PARAGON FOLDING COT 



is essential to the outfit of every camper, canoeist, yachtsman, et« , 
who wishes comfort in camping. It is as easy as the finest spring 
bed. Made of heavy canvas, dipped plates and heavy straps, it is 
practically indestructible; and there are no cross legs to catch youc 
body. It folds into a package about 2 ft. long x 5 in x 4 in., weigh- 
ing 13^g pounds, easy to transport. Price, $3.50. Write for circu- 
lars giving full description and mention Recreation. 

THE PARAGON FOLDING FURNITURE CO. 
141 Centre Street, New York City 



xlii RECREATION. 



Decorate Your Den 

with a set of the most beautiful 

Hunting and Fishing Pictures 

ever made. 

15 PLATES SIZE FOR FRAMING, 18x24 INCHES 

SUBJECTS : 

ELK HUNTING SALMON FISHING MOOSE HUNTING TROUT FISHING 

HY. SANDHAM 

MALLARD SHOOTING— BLACK BASS FISHING— C. E. DENTON 

TARPON FISHING— BLUE FISHING— FRED S. COZZENS 

ANTELOPE HUNTING— GOOSE SHOOTING— FRED REMINGTON 

GROUSE SHOOTING— WILD TURKEY HUNTING— R. F. ZOGBAUM 

MUSKALONGE FISHING— F. H. TAYLOR 

DEER HUNTING— A. B. FROST 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP HUNTING— E. KNOBEL 

These 15 plates are lithographed in true colors of nature, and altogether make 
one of the finest series of pictures of out-door sports ever published. 

ORIGINALLY ISSUED AT $50 A SET 

I have bought the last of them and can furnish a complete set for 15 yearly 
subscriptions to Recreation, 

Or will sell at $10 a Set 



I also have enlargements of the following photographs: 

ro:ky mountain goats 

Published on pages 90, 91, 92 and 93 of the February, 1903, issue of Recrea- 
tion, size 8 x 10, $5 a set. 

WOOD DUCK SHOOTING 

Published on page 95 of the February issue of Recreation, size 10 x 12, 
#1.50 each. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN GOAT, male and female, size 10 x 12, price $1.50. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN GO IT, male and female, latter sitting down, size 8 x 10, price 
$1.50. 

FISHHAWK, with Dead Chicken, published in March, 1903, Recreation, size 10 x 12, 
price $1.50, 

BLACK BEAR, in Montana Pine Forest, size 10x12, price $1.50. 

COON LEAPING FROM TREE, published in March, 1903, Recreation, size 10 x 12, 
price $1.50. 



Address: RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, N. Y. City 



; 



• 



RECREATION. 



Xllll 



- 








m 




1-5^^5^"^^^*" -£5~2??2 






:^i2SEH^TH@jlii 





Folding Canvas Boats 

were not satisfactory until the 



11 -foot Special 



was produced. It's a revelation 
in boat construction, nothing 
like it ever made. Nonsinkable 
Cant tip over. Puncture Proof 
wear longer than a wooden boat. 
No repairs. No cost for storage, 
always ready, folds into a small 
neat package, carry by hand* 
used by the U. S. Navy. They are simple, wonderful. A thoroughly 
patented article. Beware of imitations. Made only by ourselves. A cat- 
alog of IOO engravings and 400 testimonials sent on receipt of 6 cents. 

Bottom Boards rest on the frame, not on the canvas, ribbed longitu- 
dinally and diagonally. They are stiffer and safer than a Wooden Boat 
because the lines are fuller, and are much easier to row or paddle. 

KING FOLDING CANVAS BOAT CO. 

Mention Recreation. KALAMAZOO, MICH., U. S, A 



Tourist — And did the musical genius 
born on this ranch finish his education in 
Europe ? 

Borax Bob — No ; right here in Arizony. 
He tried to convince some of the boys that 
rag time warn't good music, an' they bur- 
ied him an' his pianner together. — Judge. 



The way in which you call game hogs to 
account meets with my approval, also the 
manner in which you called C. S. Atkin- 
son in the March number. No true 
sportsman would sanction the production 
of the new automatic shot gun. 

E. W. B., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



T am a constant reader of Recreation 
and get as much photo news from it as I 
do from 2 other regular magazines on pho- 
tography. 

Wm. H. Slocum, Peoria, 111. 



He was ashamed to go home empty 
handed, so he stopped at a grocer's and 
bought a rabbit. 

"Good luck!" he cried to his wife on his 
return. "Look at the rabbit. See where 
the bullet went through him." 

His wife took the rabbit, sniffed, grim- 
aced and turned away. 

"You were wise, my dear," she said, "to 
shoot this rabbit today. Tomorrow would 
have been too late." — New York Tribune. 

WANTED: — Double-barreled Ham- 
merless Shot Gun, 12- gauge; must be in 
good order; for smokeless powder. 
Makes : Ithaca, Smith, Parker, Greener, 
Savage Rifle .303 and .22. A. C. Kugler, 
Soda Springs, Idaho. 






liffliiif 



Patented 




Can be instantly applied to 
boats, wagon seats, lawn seats, 
ball park seats, in fact can be 
applied to any board seat not 
over \ l /% inch in thickness. 

Trice \ Cordur °y> $4-°°- 

' \ Imitation Leather, $3. 50. 

Delivered to your address in 
any pare of the United States 
east of the Rocky Mountains, by 

ThcOldffickoryChairCo. 

MARTINSVILLE, IND. 




xliv 



RECREATION. 



Paroid Roofing 

"IT LASTS » 

The ideal covering for the roof and sides of camps and boathouses. Costs 

much less than shingles, and anyone can apply it. A complete 

roofing kit — tins, nails and cement inside each roll 

F. W. BIRD & SON, Makers 

Established 1817 

EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 
NEW YORK CHICAGO WASHINGTON 



A practical device that ought to be ap- 
preciated by every shooter, angler and oars- 
man is the Garrett Ball Bearing Oarlock, 
made by T. H. Garrett, Jr., Auburn, N. Y. 
Many a good shot and many a large fish 
has every sportsman lost by using the ordi- 
nary oarlocks, with their constant rattle 
and clank, their irritating squeak and their 
everlasting chuck. The Garrett Oarlocks 
are free from all these annoyances. The 
application of the ball bearing principle 
makes these oarlocks noiseless and friction- 
less, while at the same time they are simple, 
neat, and strong. The easy action of the 
Garrett oarlocks enables a man to accom- 
plish-twice as much as he could with the 
old style and the same force. With the 
Garrett oarlocks every ounce of energy ap- 
plied to the handle of an oar is transmitted 
to the blade without loss. Fancy what 
hard work it would be to propel a bicycle 
up hill if the parts were not ball bearing! 
Same difference between the old style of 
oarlock and Mr. Garrett's Ball Bearing Oar- 
lock. 

Mr. Garrett is a practical sportsman and 
invented this oarlock to meet his own 
needs. When his friends saw the device 
they clamored for a pair, and he was thus 
almost forced into the manufacture of these 
goods. Write him for a descriptive circu- 
lar and please say you saw the ad in Rec- 
reation. 

He : I shall never see you again ! 
She : Well, don't call to-morrow night, 
for I'll be out. — Life. 



WE DEARLY LOVE A TRAIN. 
Where is the person with soul so dead, 
who never to himself, herself or it hath 
said, "I dearly love to see the train go 
by?" We love action, life, movement, 
speed, and find them all in a limited or 
unlimited express. Apropos, one of the 
exhibits at the St. Louis fair is a fac- 
simile of the Empire State Express of 
the New York Central, a creation of 
George H. Daniels. Nothing in the en- 
tire show attracts more attention, for this 
train has been advertised throughout the 
universe. It has been on our postage 
stamps, and that's the only way it ever 
got licked, says Mr. Daniels. June 17th, by 
actual count, 7,022 persons walked through 
the splendid coaches and hovered about the 
locomotive. Alongside is the ancient relic, 
the De Witt Clinton, with its 3 quaint cars, 
the first train ever placed on the Central 
road. The contrast is powerfully appealing 
and instructive. 



Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
The West Weedless Hook Co., 

Dear Sirs : — I have used your hooks 
the past season; both your tandem hooks 
with and without wire to hold irog securely 
in place. I find them both excellent and 
particularly the frog tie which enables a 
person to make many casts and secure many 
bass by the use of one frog, which is im- 
portant when frogs are scarce. 

G. H. Scott, Judge of Superior Court. 



TALBOT REEL 

is known to Tournament winners 
and Experts to be the best. Try our 
Lines, Hooks and Rods. Ask for 
Catalogue "E" giving discriptions. 

W. H. TALBOT CO., Nevada, Mo., U. S. A. 




RECREATION. 



xlv 



RUSHTON 



CANOESf 




Pleasure and Health 

are obtained at one and the same 
time by the fortunate owner of a 
canoe. When the weather is so hot 
that you can't do anything else out- 
of-doors, you can keep cool on the 
Water, in the shade, and spend the 
afternoon in paddling, reading, or 
sleeping. Canoeing is the easiest, 
cleanest and quietest exercise — 
adaptedfor ladiesas wellas gentlemen 
Get a canoe right away for the rest 
of this season. If you get a " Rushton" 
it will last for many seasons to come. 

Send for my complete Catalogue of pleasure 
boats, all-cedar and canvas-covered canoes, oars, 
paddles, sails and fittings— free for the asking. 

J. H. RUSHTON, 817 Water St., Canton, N. Y. 



I am a lover of sports of all kinds and as 
I do nearly all my hunting and fishing in 
the magazines I know a good one when I 
read it. I congratulate you on the excel- 
lence of Recreation. I have read nearly 
every sportsmen's periodical printed and find 
more pleasure in Recreation than in any 
other. 

Albert Niemann, Pittsburg, Pa. 



Teacher — Now, Homer, a husband gives 
his wife 10 dollars to go down and buy a 
4-dollar muff, a 2-dollar plume, and a 50- 
cent veil. How much does she bring back? 

Homer — Sixteen different complexion 
soaps, a basket of health foods, and a bill 
of 7 dollars for a spring jacket. — Milwau- 
kee Sentinel. 



Motors 

&to25H.P, 



Operated by 

GASOLINE 
WOR 



The Fay & Bowen Marine Motor is a revelation to 
those who have used others. Reliable, safe, durable 
and easy to operate. Remarkable speed control. 
Best of all, it starts when you start it. No handle 
or crank is used. Our patent igniter is absolutely unique end al- 
ways instant and positive in action. It is really the only perfect 
and satisfactory igniter. Motors complete from lj^ to 25 actual 
Horse Power ready for installation. 

We also build a line of the finest launches afloat, complete with 
our motor installed, all ready to run. We make these in either the 
usual round stern model or our flat stern torpedo model in lengths 
from 18 to 35 feet. We furnish large cabin launches on special order. 
For excellence of workmanship and beauty of finish and design our 
boats are unsurpassed. Ask for description of our fast torpedo 
outfits. 

Send for catalogue and live testimonials from, satisfied 
customers. Our customers are our best advertisers. 

FAY (EL BOWEN ENGINE CO. 
74 Lacke Street, Geneva, N. Y. 

(FORMERLY AUBURN, N. V.) 



He: 



She 



If by some fairy wisdom 
You were turned into 1 an eel, 

I'd love you just as dearly 
With all my present zeal. 

And if that selfsame fairy 
Should, with the same endeavor, 

Change you into an octopus 
I'd love you more than ever. 
— Four Track News. 



He — We must economize. Suppose, darl- 
ing, you try your hand at making your own 
clothes. 

She — Oh ! George, dear, I never could do 
that. Suppose I begin by trying to make 
yours? — New Yorker. 




Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, Can- 

ACME FOLDING BOAT CO., MIAMISBUKO. O. ^^ j^^ Just fiUed an order for 'u. & 

Government, who prefer our boats. Received medal and award at Chicago World's 
Fair. If you investigate we will get your order. Mention Recreation. 

Acme Folding Boact Company, Mi©Lmisb\irg, O. 
A Sportman 's MULLIN S " Get There " Steel Duck Boat 

Boat j- MiffBl m mmmmm*^ Price $20— Crated on cars Salem 

Endorsed by Thousands of Sports- 
men. Air Chamber each end. Always ready.. 
No repairs. Send for handsome free book. 

W. H. MUIXINS 
228 Depot Street, • Salem, Ohio 




14 

ft nnw 

II. long;, 

36-inch beam. 



xlvi 



RECREATION. 



Latest patent and Im- 
proved Canvas Fold- 
ing Boat on the 
Market. 



Puncture proof. 
Tempered steel 
fra.me, No bolts to 
remove. Folds most 
compact of any boat 
made. 




THE 



Latest, Safest 

AND 

Best Canvas Boat 

Is what we offer you. A Boat 
built on modern lines that will 
prove a pleasure to own and use. 
Selected materials used through- 
out, and it comes to you guar- 
anteed the best. A handy and 
safe boat for fishing and shoot- 
ing. Write for descriptive circu- 
lar and catalogue. Enclose 4c. 
for postage. Mention Recreation. 

LIFE SAVING FOLDING 

CANVAS BOAT COMPANY 

757 Portage St. 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 



A SPECIAL FEATURE OF THE 
WORLD'S FAIR. „ 

The Prudential Insurance Company of 
America has on view in the Palace of Edu- 
cation at the World's Fair, St. Louis, a 
remarkable exhibit of life insurance meth- 
ods and results. The exhibit includes a 
large and beautiful model of the Prudential 
Home Office buildings, at Newark, N. J. ; 
a handsome stained glass reproduction of 
the rock of Gibraltar, illuminated by elec- 
tricity; and 178 charts, diagrams, photo- 
graphs, etc.; which explain on a large scale 
the inner workings of the life insurance 
business. 

The exhibit brings out the fact that at 
the beginning of 1903 there were over 
17,000,000 life insurance policies in force, 
as compared with 7,000,000 homes owned 
in the United States, 6,000,000 savings bank 
depositors, 4,000,000 fraternal order certifi- 
cates, and 1,500,000 building and loan cer- 
tificates. ^ 

The charts illustrating the medical ex- 
perience of the company are of unusual in- 
terest to physicians, public health officials, 
etc., as well as to the general public. 

The social economist and the expert in 
public and private charity administration 
will be interested in charts descriptive of 
the reduction in the pauper burial rate in 
American cities since the introduction of 
industrial insurance ; the enormous extent 
to which industrial insurance has become 
an element of household economics ; the 



relative expenditures for life insurance 
among men in different occupations and 
with different incomes ; and the relation of 
expenditures for life insurance to other 
items of the family budget. A number of 
photographs show the homes of industrial 
policy holders. 



During the early days of the Manhattan 
Elevated Railroad, in New York, the trains 
did not run on Sundays. One Sunday 
morning, ignorant of this fact, a traveler 
rushed up to the stairway, only to find the 
gates closed. Noticing the letters, "M. E. 
R. R." over the entrance, he said in dis- 
gusted tones : 

"I might know a Methodist Episcopal 
Railroad wouldn't run on Sundays." — Ex- 
change. 



Recreation is the best periodical of its 
nature I have ever read. Being a great 
lover of all kinds of innocent sport, I am 
glad to know a man who is not afraid to 
score the game and fish hogs who do not 
know when they have enough. 

Robt. Hill, Dewey, Ariz. 



"What do you tink of dis millionaire 
dat says nobody ought to take a vacation?" 
asked Plodding Pete. 

"He's right," answered Meandering Mike. 
"Nobody ought to do enough work to need 
any vacation." — Washington Star. 



EASIER TO ROW 



ABSOLU a TELY SAFE 




"Write today 
for free catalogue. 
15 foot C9Q 

boat, crated ^£>J 



Especially valuable at summer 
resorts, for family boating. 



Mullins Galvanized 
Steel Pleasure Boats 

Made of steel. Practical indestructible. Air 
chamber each end. Cannot leak. Require no 
caulking. Ideal boat for family use, summer 
resorts, parks. Guaranteed. Will seat five persons in com- 
fort. The modern row boat for pleasure, safety and durability. 

W. H. MULLINS. 228 Depot Street, Salem, Ohio 



THE BALL-BEARING OARLOCKS 

A device that does for the rowboat what the ball-bearing did for the 
bicycle. Every ounce of energy applied to the handle is transmitted 
to the blade without loss. No clanking or squeaking — does twice 
the work with one-half the effort. Absolutely noiseless 
and Irictionless. The ideal locks for pleasure rowing, hunt- 
ing and fishing. For either tight or loose oars as desired. If not 
handled by your dealer, write for descriptive circular and prices. 

T. H. GARRETT, Jr.% J52£» AUBURN. N. Y. 




RECREATION. 



lvii 



xivn 



Take good care of 
your hands 



You may need 
them next year 



Send me 
2 yearly subscriptions to Recreation 

and I will send you 
a pair of Leather Hunting Gloves 

made to your measure, by the 

Luther Glove Company 

Berlin, Wisconsin 



Sample copies for use in canvass- 
ing furnished on request 



She thought of her trousseau first, 

Of her dress, her gloves, her veil ; 
Of the stately way she should tread the 
aisle, 

And how to manage her trail. 
Of bridesmaids, ushers, and guests, 

The minister — then she said : 
"I've forgotten something, I guess. 
Now, let me see — oh, yes !" 

'Twas the man she was going to wed. 
— Philadelphia Bulletin. 



The Parker gun has reason to be proud 
of its record among the amateur shooters at 
the recent shoot of the Vicksburg Gun Club, 
concluded May 18. Mr. Ed. Brady, of 
Memphis, won highest amateur average for 
the entire shoot, and Mr. Paul Chaudet, of 
New Orleans, was third, both shooters us- 
ing the Parker gun. For amateurs this is 
a remarkable showing. 



"What are the university buildings all 
lighted up for to-night?" 

"They're giving a reception to Professor 
Ontrack. He has discovered a microbe that 
feeds on the microbe discovered by Profes- 
sor Diggitup the other day." — Chicago Tri- 
bune. 



Points! 

Presto Mosquito and Fly Re- 
pellant and Insect Exterminator 
has points which make it unique 
as a camp and household req- 
uisite. Here are some of them: 

It is non-poisonous — It is colorless — 
It has a pleasant odor — It leaves no 
stain — It will kill all insects — It will 
keep mosquitos and flies from biting — 
It is a ready seller. 

Therefore we want agents everywhere. 
We have had house-to-house canvassers 
who have made $40 per week. 

Ask your dealer for it. If he does 
not have ''Presto" accept nothing in its 
place. Sample can will be sent for 20 
cents postpaid. 

Mention Recreation. 

Presto Manufacturing 
Company 

Lock Box 1248 Ossiningf N.Y. 



You can save time with the new postage 
stamp by sticking the letter up in the right 
hand corner of it. — The Washington Post. 




piorris Canvas Covered Canoes 

Special Indian model for safety. Catalog on request. 
Mention Recreation. 

E. N* MORRIS, Veasie, Maine 



THE MINING HERALD 

Leading mining and financial paper, giving all the news 
from the mining districts, and containing latest and most 
reliable information on the mining and oil industries, 
principal companies, dividends, etc. Every investor should 
have it. We will send it free for six months upon request. 
A. L. WISNER & CO., 32 Broadway, NEW YORK. 



Practical Common Sense CAIVSP 
in 6 Sizes. STOVE 

Either with or with- 
out oven. The light- 
est, strongest, most 
compact, practical 
stove made. Cast 
combination sheet 
steel top, smooth out- 
side, heavy lining in 
fire box and around 
oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe carried inside the 
stove. Burns large wood and keeps fire longer than any 
other. Used by over 9,000 campers and only one stove 
returned. 

For catalogue giving full particulars, mention Recrea- 
tion and address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 




* ft i I 

xlvm 



RECREATION. 




The True Sportsman's Reel 
■ Y and E" Automatic 



^ Built to stand the strain of catching fish that are worth while. 

1$ Takes up the slack faster than the Scaly Gentleman can make it. 

The simple pressing of a slide makes it Free 
Running (just like any 
other reel) or Automatic 
—a feature you will 
heartily appreciate for fly 
and bait casting. 

*I Write today for 

handsome new booklet 

No. 109— "When Pardner 

was Mascot" — the exciting story of the biggest 

Rainbow Trout ever landed. _*~-" F 




Little 
Finger 
does it 1^" 



4 



BOOKLET 109 

Sent Postpaid Upon Your Request 



V 




YAWMAN & ERBE MFG. CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



HERE IS ANOTHER! 

If you will send me 

15 Yearly Subscriptions 



to 



RECREATION 

I will send you a high-grade, powerful 

FIELD GLASS 

LISTED AT $15.00 

A field glass is indispensable to every hunter, and this is 
one of the latest and best on the market for the price. I 
have but a few of these instruments on hand and the offer 
will be withdrawn as soon as the supply is exhausted. 
Therefore, if you want one start immediately. 



Sample copies of RECREATION for use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION. 



xlix 




Free: Black Squirrels and Parti-Col- 
ored Squirrels. — Will send a pair of either 
kind o f these rare and beautiful pets to 
any on whc will send me 12 new yearly 
subscription to Recreation. Will send 
a pair of handsom- Fox Squirrels for 6 
new yearly subscriptions or a pair of cute 
little Flying Squirreb for only 2 new sub- 
scriptions. Squirrel ■ are the prettiest, 
tamest, cleanest and most satisfactory of 
all pets. Safe delivery of squirrels guar- 
anteed to all parts of U. S. or Canada. 
E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Tex. 



John A. Flick, of Ravine, O., a one-armed 
shooter, using the Parker gun, on May 
19 broke 23 out of 25 in a gale of wind. No 
other score was over 18. This was a won- 
derful performance for Mr. Flick, and 
speaks with credit for the performance 
of the old reliable Parker. 



I can not imagine a better magazine than 
Recreation. All the others combined can 
not even up with it. Every issue is better 
than the previous one. Long live Recrea- 
tion. Edw. Beck, Fergus Falls, Minn. 



"I nivir rode in a carriage" 
"Didn't yer?" 

"No ; me little brudder died before I was 
born."— Life. 



Small Profits— Quick Sales 



TROUT 
FLIES 



for trial— sens us 



4 C/"» L or an assorted sample doz. 




Regular price, 24 cents. 

for an assorted sampl 
Regular price, 60 cents. 



lAp for an assorted sample doz. 

/Ap for an assorted sample doz. 
0"v Regular price, 84 cents. 

ZA/> for an assorted dozen D aoo C|! Q o 
Ovt Regular price 84 cents. Ddbb fllcb 



Quality A Flies 
Quality B Flies 
Quality C Flies 



SPLIT BAMBOO RODS 



Fly Rods 



57 cents 



Bait R.ods 
10 feet, 6 ounces \J m vClll^ g feet, 8 ounces 

With cork grip and extra tip, in wood form 



THE H. H. KIFFE CO. 

523 Broadway, New York City 

Catalogs of any of above goods free on application. 
Mention Reckeation. 



RECREATION. 



RISTOL RODS 





? .****: 



Use a fighting Rod for a fighting fish; 
the gamy 'lunge is a stayer, but the 
"Bristol" Steel Rod out-stays him. 
A 41-lb. 'lunge was landed in 50 
minutes on one of our little bass Rods 
in Woman's Lake, Minn. Any of our 
short bass Rods are suitable for mus- 
callonge — we also make a special 
heavy Rod for this work. 

Send for Catalog " D," showing 
Steel Rods for all fishing — they are 
guaranteed for a year. 

Sold by all Dealers at 
Reduced Prices 

The Horto.i Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., U.S. A, 




or* 

a^cexllonde 




The Bristol Steel Fishing Rod adds keen 
delirhtto the sport. Flexible, light — equal 
toalmostany emergency, fuilof life and back- 
bone. Made to last— not for a season only. 

The "Kalamazoo" Bait-casting Rod (with 
patent detachable finger hook, enabling one 
to "thumb" the reel properly) is a pro- 
nounced favorite, With it a novice can cast 
from 75 to 100 feet after a few ttials, and an 
expert can excel his best previous record. 

Send for Catalogue "D" giving- full de- 
scription of this rod and 23 other styles. 

Your dealer can supply our rods at re- 
duced prices this season. 



15he HORTON 

Bristol, Corxrv. 



MFC CO. 
V. S. A. 



RECREATION. 



li 



DO YOU WISH 

TO IMPROVE 
YOUR SHOOTING? 



THE J. C. HAND TRAP 

Will help you. It throws 
any of the clay targets now 
in use, giving - an excellent 
rei>resentation of a bird in 
flight. 

I will send you a 

J. C. HAND TRAP 

for 2, yearly subscriptions to 

Recreation 



Send in your club now and 
improve your shooting- 

The modern publisher took the modern 
author into his private cell. 

"You have," he asked sternly, "investi- 
gated the subject for this book of yours 
with more than ordinary care?" 

"Oh, yes," replied the ' modern author. 
"I have spent 3 days on it." 

"And you are arranging it in a light, 
catching way?" 

"Yes. One word to the page, with wide 
margins." 

"It will, of course, be dramatized. Who 
wih do that?" 

"I have done it. I dictated the play part 
while I was doing the book — by the mod- 
ern alternating author's current." 

"Good ! Now will you sign this letter, 
in which you say that while writing your 
great work you subsisted entirely on this 
health food. It will be included in your 
royalties." 

The modern author paused. 

"Certainly," he replied, "but why this 
particular food?" 

"Because they pay more than the others. 
Now for the title." 

"Then I would better tell you the sub- 
ject. It is " 

The modern publisher lifted his hand 
appealingly. 

"Don't I" he cried. "How do you sup- 
pose I can write an attractive, up-to-date 
title if I know the subject?" 

He laid his hand kindly on the arm of 
the other. 

"My young friend," he observed, "you 
have yet much to learn,"— Life, 



Wfien Tfirougfi Witti Your Fisfiing Tackle 

for the season you should put it away carefully and in 
good order, so that you may examine it at intervals 
during the winter, show it to your friends, discuss the 
various articles and add such as may he needed for 



next season. 



An Ideal Provision 

for such care may be found in 

THe JoHhsoq Trayiess Tackle Box 




(P.-itent Applied for) 

SENT, CARRIAGE PAID, FOR $2.00 

REFERENCES 

Recreation, New York City 
Yale National Bank, New Haven, Conn. 

Address with remittance or tor further details 

MERRIAM MFG. CO. 

DURHAM, CONN. 

TIN BOXES FOR ALL OFFICE USES 



I am more than pleased with Recreation. 
Especially I commend the way you roast the 
game and fish hogs. If it were -not for them 
the real sport there is in angling and hunt- 
ing would be greatly increased; also the 
game and fish that abound in our forests 
and streams, and all would be benefited. 
There should be no other object on the part 
of the hunter or angler when going out on a 
trip than true sport and not to see how 
much he can slaughter and then brag about 
it. Such a course will soon put a stop to the 
whole business for the want of something 
to hunt and fish for. 

J. H. Trafford, Chenango Forks, N. Y. 



"TAKAPART" REEL 



(No tools required.) 




" Best 
Casting " 
Seel 
on Earth 



Very Smooth Running. 

Highest finish and workmanship. Handle is adjustable in 
any position. Bearings on spool are adjustable, with which 
a slight friction can be applied to prevent back lashing. 
Quadruple action. Compare it with any other, if it is not the 
best by all odds, return it. 60 yd. $5, 80 yd. $5.50, 100 yd. $6 
With "Automatic" Click, 50c extra. From all Dealers. 
Send for Catalogue. 

A. F. MEISSELBACH & BRO., Mfrs. 
MsnMcm BscagATiow, 8 Prospect St., Newark, N, «j» 



Hi 



RECREATION. 



' MMklMb, u ! -■. ' .. ". ' g ' gS " . .- S '' IJ ". J ..- ' J ' ■ ■ / w - ' ••'■ W ' M« 




MV 



to**M 



NMI 




Here's the Point About a 
"Y and E" Automatic Reel 



B 



The gentle pressure of your little 
finger on the brake applies 
a tension to the line which 
ABSOLUTELY PREVENTS the 
Scaly Gentleman from getting 
SLACK enough to dislodge 
your hook. Think what an 
added zest this gives to 
the sport of fighting out 




Little finger 
does it 



your battles with the finny tribe ! 

Besides, the Automatic-Com- 
bination feature makes your Reel Free 
Running (just like any other Reel) or Auto- 
matic — by the simple pressing of a slide. That 
saves winding a crank like fury, to reel in your line 
after you have made a cast. 

'""- — --— _--'" Write today for our handsome new booklet No. 109 "When 

Pardner was Mascot"— the story of the biggest Rainbow Trout ever landed. 

pa^nyKeS! YAWMAN & ERBE KFG. CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



mmmmmmmmm^*m*m*^\ w m m mm . | M | ■ ■ u, 1 "■ ■» ' mmmm * ,\ \ . \\ .j.uw. uo. i 

L 'him ■ AiwM^Wiiii mm T ii <— fiiniii ■■■*■ iiiiaiiMiiMi ■■■ mi h m wiihiibh ■urn i i iiiii^i ■iiiia 1 1 i i 



! 



"Oh, George," sighed the romantic girl, 
"I wish you were like the old time knights ; 
I wish you'd do something brave to show 
your love for me." 

"Gracious! Haven't I agreed to marry 
you, and me only getting $20 a week?" — 
Philadelphia Press. 



I received the Marble safety ax you sent 
me as a premium. It is the best little ax 
I ever saw. No hunter should go in the 
woods without one when they can be so 
easily obtained. 

F. W. Redfern, Holyoke, Mass. 



I have long been a reader and admirer of 
Recreation, and to me it is the most wel- 
come of all periodicals that hold a place 
in the librarv. 

J. M. Bradford, Beloit, Wis. 



Please accept my thanks for the Harring- 
ton & Richardson revolver you sent me. 
It is a beauty and I do not see how you 
can give such valuable premiums for so 
few subscriptions. 

R. F. Green, Solsville, N. Y. 



Cope — I hear your boss expects to raise 

your salary next month? 

Hope — So he says. But he hasn't suc- 
ceeded in raising all of last month's yet. 
— Philadelphia Ledger. 



Aubrey — Youah daughtah has consented 
to mawy me, and — er — I'd like to know if 
there is any insanity in youah family? 

Old Gentleman (emphatically) — There 
must be ! — Just Fun. 



Detachable €wn Spoolers 




WHEN attached to a good reel make the best casting and fishing outfit on earth at about 
half the price of old style. They give perfect satisfaction in every case. To prevent 
regret later on, don't buy the wrong reel. Our free catalog (B) names reels spooler 
will fit. Price and description of spoolers, gun cleaners, fish scalers, ball bearing, jeweled, and 
steel pivot bearing reels fitted with even spooler. Our new rubber hook-shield binds hook and 
line securely to rod when not in use. All sorts of trouble and profanity prevented in an instant. 

a. w. bishop & son, pATE R N i^ E r^rr s c . i r RS 



MckbAfloti. 



liii 




I received the Acme single shot gun 
which you sent me as a premium for sub- 
scriptions to Recreation. I have given the 
gun a trial, am much pleased with it, and 
thank you for such a valuable premium. I 
expect to send you more subscriptions soon. 

Aug. Schulze, Jr., New Braunfels, Tex. 



Kwoter — After all, "Truth is stranger 
than fiction," you know. 

Newitt — It may be stranger, but it isn't 
so successful. You never hear of truth 
going into its 20th edition in 6 months. — 
Philadelphia Press. 



Miss June — You are married, Mrs. 
March, and you ought to know. Do you 
believe in love at first sight? 

Mrs. March (looking grimly at Mr. M.) 
— Well, I think it can happen once. — Som- 
erville (Mass.) Journal. 



A WOMAN'S WISH: 
When we leave this World's distresses 

Bound for lands beyond the skies, 
How I hope there'll be no dresses 
Fastened up with hooks and eyes. 

— Exchange. 



you 



need is change of 



Doctor— What 
climate. 

Patient — Change of climate ! Why, I've 
never had anything else. If the climate 
would only stay the same 2 days running, 
I'd be all right.--The Pathfinder. 



I have received the Korona camera given 
for subscriptions to your magazine. It is 
entirely satisfactory and I thank you most 
sincerely. 

F. W. Belknap, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 



"Was your vacation a success?" 
"Complete. I spent so much money on 

it that now I've simply got to take a rest." 

— Exchange. 




i* Casters 



Cast into any kind of weeds — that's where the fish are — with our 
Hooks. Unbreakable. No swivels. Minnow holding devices. 
Frog Holders that will take a dozen bass to the frog. Any size 
hook 15 cents. Catalogue sent. Patents applied for. 

THE WEST IEEDLESS HOOK CO., 12 and 14 Pearl St., Council Bluffs, Iowa 



liv 



RECREATION. 




EVERY SPORTSMAN NEEDS 

V 

A Kenwood 



leepim* Ba 



Can be rolled into a small space 
Made to stand rough usage 
Is a perfect bed 
Absolutely keeps out moisture 



Let us send you sample of materials and price 
and prove to you how superior a KENWOOD 
BAG is to blankets or any other sleeping bag 

Mention Recreation. 



Write /or booklet 
giving description 
etc- i i i 



The Kenwood Mills 



Bo* 66i, Albany, N. Y. 



|8rn6tiiih| Sftefcial; A fin£ Gating 
MlhflOw l?ree: To each persbii seiidihg 
hie $t Idf ©he he^W yearly subs6rif>tJ6ri 
t6 ReC&eAt16^ 0r striding it direct to be 
placed it) fiiy credit, I Will forward, ail 
charges prepaid, a finely finished wood- 
eri gastlng minnow; This minnow has 
the iatest improved spinner which will 
hot Catch upon the weeds; is finished 
with silver' beiiy and green back, has 
three treble hooks, is weighted so it will 
hot twist the line, always keeps right 
side tip when in the water, and is just 
the right weight for casting. Lloyd J. 
Tooley, 141 Burr Oak Street, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 



PATENTS 



promptly obtained OR NO FEE. Trade-Marks, 
Caveats, Copyrights and Labels. registered. 
TWENTY YEARS' PRACTICE. Highest references. 
Send model, sketch or photo, for free report 
on patentability. All business confidential. 
HAND-BOOK FREE. Explains everything. Tells 
How to Obtain and Sell Patents, What Inventions 
Will Pay, How to Get a Partner, explains best 
meohanioal movements, and contains 300 other 
■abjecti of importance to inventors. Address, 

H. B. WILLSON & CO. MmX 



786 F Street, N.W., 



Attorneys 
WASHINGTON, D. G., 



The Buffalo Is Well Nigh Extinct 

And every nature lover wants a relic 
of him. Here is a chance to get it: 
I have in stock a Hmited number of 
buffalo horns, highly polished and 
fitted with nickel plated flanges at 
the base, ' so that they can be 
screwed on the wall, thus forming 

A Novel and 
Effective Gun Rack 

So long as the supply lasts I will 
give a pair of these horns for 

3 Yearly Subsqriptionsto RECREATION 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request- Address 

Recreation, 23 W. 24th a, New York 



RECREATION. 



lv 



The GARRISON RIFLE CLEANER 



Patented August 26, 190a 




Spiral wire shows shape of spring tempered cleaner core. 



The principle of construction is a spirally-bent spring tempered wire with sections of 
very soft brass wire gauze washers separated by soft metal washers. The brass gauze 
brushes are a little smaller than the bore of the rifle they are intended to clean and in 
pushing the cleaner through the barrel the spring of the wire core forces the brass gauze 
brushes firmly against the entire circumference of the bore of rifle, thus removing spots 
of lead, burnt powder, or rust. 

This cleaner solves the problem of the perfect and rapid cleaning of smokeless powder 
rifles with but very little expenditure of time and energy. The residue of smokeless pow- 
der deposited with such force against the bore of the gun makes its removal almost 
impossible with cloth patch or ordinary wire brush ; but it yields readily to the strong 
pressure applied by the spring tempered core of this cleaner. The fact that one Garrison 
cleaner will outwear at least two dozen ordinary wire brushes makes it a money as well as 
a labor saver. Made for all caliber rifles. The threaded end is made to fit the large or 
small sockets of all Marble rifle rods. The small ends will fit the small threaded sockets 
of other makers' rods. 

With, large or small end, price prepaid, 50c. 
Mention Caliber. Sold by dealers or direct Send for 1904 catalog and mention Recreation. 

Marble Safety Axe Co. De P t. a., Gladstone, Mich. 



I received the Hawk-eye camera you sent 
me for subscriptions to Recreation. I am 
much pleased with it and do not see how 
you can afford to give such premiums. 
Kindly accept my hearty thanks. 

F. J. Goss, Springfield, Mass. 



"I went to California," said the distin- 
guished Western man, "as a forty-niner.'' 

"Dear me," rejoined the annoying girl, 
"were you marked down from fifty?" — 
Washington Star. 



What legislators those Japs would make ! 
They will risk their lives to seize a pass. 
—The Philadelphia North American. 



"CoHan-Oil" 

preserves leather and 
renders shoes and 
harness positively 

WcATERPROOF 

Used by the U. S 
the Army and Navy 
and National Guard. 

Send 25c. for trial can. 
AGENTS WANTED 
Write for terms and circulars ^ 

^ J, R, BUCKELEW 

Bept. A. - jj J Chambers St., N. Y, 



mkferproof 

LEATHER 

DRESSING 

AN D 

RUST % 

\ PREVENTER 



Billings — They haven't decided yet what 
was the cause of Tom's death. When found 
there was a bottle half full of whiskey on 
the table. It is very sad. 

Noddle — I believe you ! What a pity he 
couldn't have lived long enough to drink 
it all ! — Boston Transcript. 



Douglas H. Shepherd 

Manuiacturer of Artificial 

GLASS EYES 

for birds, animals, fish, etc., 

DOUGLAS II. SHEPHERD 
Box 106, Taunton, Mass. 

Stamp for Catalogue 
Mention Kecreation. 




SPORTSMEN— DO IT NOW 

Send to-day for our New Catalog It tells how 
we teach TAXIDERMY BY MAIL. 

We can teach you to mount all 
kinds of Birds, Animals, Heads, 
etc., accurately and 1 rue to 
Life. You can save the fine 
trophies that fall before your gun, 
double your interest in sports, and 
make your gun pay its own way. 
Easily and quickly learned, very 
fascinating. If yon are a sports- 
men our catalog will interest you, 
and IT'S FREE. T.et us rnail you 
one. 

Thousands of Testimonials from §tudents. Write right 
now. 

TIi© Northwestern School of Taxidermy 9 lac. 

Suite A, Com, Nat. Bank., Omaha, Neb 9 




lvi 



RECREATION. 



Ar\ythin,g That's Knit 







BLA WELT'S 




Hunting and Fishing 

COATS 

THE BEST THAT'S MADE 



In Oxford Grey or Dead Grass, or 
any other color or combination of colors, 
made to your measure. 

Sweaters of all kinds — for Men, 
Women, Boys and Girls. The correct 
and comfortable garment for the seashore, 
country or mountains. 



Marl Orders Promptly 

BLAUVELT'S HUNTING AND FISHING COAT ^S*Tl CflCl€Ci TO 

Good Agents Wanted Mention Recreation 

BLAUVELT KNITTING CO. 

148 and 150 Central Ave. Newark, N. J. 



Squabs are raised in i month, bring big 
prices. Eager market. Astonishing 
profits. Easy for women and invalids. 
Use your spare time profitably. Small 
space and capital. Here is something 
worth looking into. Facts given in our 
FREE BOOK, " How to make money 
_ with Squabs." PLYMOUTH ROCK 
SQUAB CO., 289 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 




"What do you think of the Americans?'' 
asked the reporter who was interviewing 
the distinguished Japanese. 

"The Americans are the greatest people 
I have seen in my travels. Indeed, they 
may well be called 'the Japanese of the 
West.'"— Baltimore World. 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

Indian Beadwork, Baskets, Pottery, 
Moccasins, Alaskan Curios, Mexi- 
can Goods, Beads, Basket Material. 
If it's Indian we have it. 

Send 6c. Stamps for Catalogue. 

BENHAM INDIAN TRADING CO. 

138 West 42d Street, New York City 

Mention Recreation. 




Salmon and Trout Flies 

Every fly tied by an experienced angler 
and guaranteed as neat and strong as can 
he produced in the world. Any pattern 
tied; very best English hooks; all import- 
ers' materials. Edward Hickson, Bathurst, 
N. B„ Canada. 



"You're the first girl- 
she said ; 



'Oh, don't!" 



"For whether or no, the past is past — 
The point now is to make me feel 
Quite sure that I shall be the last." 

— Town Topics. 



I received the Al Vista camera you sent 
me as a premium. Please accept my thanks. 
It is all one could ask for so little work as 
it takes to get subscriptions for Recreation, 
the best of all sportsmen's periodicals. 

Frank L. Moore, Terre Haute, Ind. 



Customer — Do you keep fur caps? 

Fresh Clerk — No, sir ; we sell 'em. 

Customer— Not always, my friend, 
may keep one that you might have 
me. Good day. — Philadelphia Press. 



You 
sold 




Spo 



rf^mPn ^° not ^ a -' to £- ut a tu ^ e °f Cedaroleum 



SUPERIOR TAP CO., 



in your Gun Case when starting- on your 
vacation. It is impervious to atmosphere and salt water. It 
will not evaporate nor grow rancid. It is the most up-to-date 
rust preventive and gun-lubricant on the market. 

One ounce tube, 1 5c; two ounce tubes, 25c 

Both sizes having injecting point. If your dealer does not 
carry this in stock, send stamps for sample tube. Special prices 
given to clubs and dealers upon application. 

Mention Recreation. 

SPRINGFIELD, VT. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



POWDER! POWDER! 

All kinds of powder for Rifles? 

Pistols and Shot Guns? 
measured accurately from 

i to 145 grains. 4 different measures 
in 1 . The latest and best tool. Ask 
your dealer for it. 

Every shooter should have 1. Send 3 
stamps for Ideal Hand Book, 146 pages 
of information to shooters. 

IDEAL MFG. CO., ! 2 U St., New Haven, Conn., U. S. L 

The PHIL B. BEKEART CO., of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast 

When you write kindly mention Recreation 




Naybor — Is that a new henhouse you're 
building? 

Mr. Snappy — No, this is an old one I'm 
building to take the place of the new one I 
tore down last week. — Philadelphia Ledger. 



Eleanor — So he proposed in his automo- 
bile after a week's acquaintance. 

Mae — What did you tell him? 

Eleanor — I told him he was exceeding 
the speed limit. — Boston Post. 



KOENIG'S SHELL EXTRACTOR. 

Every shooter should 

have one — carry it in a 

vest pocket. Fits any 

gauge shell. Koenig's 

10 Cts. Postpaid. Gun Catalogue, Free. 

E.G.Koenig, new Jersey's Largest Gun House 

south broad st., newark, n. j. 




Recreation is my favorite magazine. I 
can not do without it, as I am a lover of the 
woods. Keep at the fish and game hogs. 
Herbert W. Gill, Canton, Mont. 



The meanest man lives in Illinois. He 
refused to buy a cemetery lot for fear he 
might be lost at sea and not get the value 
of his money. — Collier's Weekly. 



Daisy — Which do you think the most im- 
pressionable, the blonde or the brunette? 

Dick — You ought to know, you've been 
both. — Chicago Daily News. 



I am a lover of Recreation. Roast the 
pork. F. G. Holt, Shelby, Ohio. 



Taxidermists' 

Materials 



Gia^ss Eyes for 
Stuffed Birds, 
and Animals 
Oologists'a^rvd 
Entomologists' 
Supplies 

Send 5c. in stamps for catalogue 

FRED. KAEMPFER, 8 »clliJ?i?i T - 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

Mention Recreation 



INDIAN 

CURIOS 

'Wholesale & Retail 
Curio Dealers' 
Supply Depot. 
Bead Work, Baskets, Elk Teeth, Mexican 
Goods, Beads, Fossils, Minerals, Arrow- 
Heads, Pottery, Alaska Ivories, Shells, 
Agates, Photos, Great Stock, Bis Cata. 5c, 
stamps. Mention Recreation. If a dealer 
say so. L# w ST1LWELL, 

Deadwood . . . , So. Dakota 



*INE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 
1 BIRDS, ETC., for sale at unheard-of prices. 

Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine, 





No Rifle complete unless mounted with one of our 

IHPROVED TELESCOPIC OUTFITS 





We make them from 3-power up. With our side 
mountings the Scope lies close to the rifle barrel and the open sights are 
left entirely clear and unobscured. 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 
Mention Recreation. 

THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPE MFQ. CO. 



Established 1857 



F. T. CORNISH, Mgr. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. S. A. 



lviii 



RECREATION. 




THE 

1904 Model 

LEATHER-COVERED Pneu- 

matic Recoil Pad is now per- 
fect. No pump, no valve, no 
recoil, no flinch, no headache, 
no bruised shoulders, no 
money if not satisfactory and 
returned at once. 

PRICE, $1.50 

J. R. WINTERS 

Clinton, Mo. 



"QUEEN OF SEA ROUTES." 

mercnants and miners Transportation Co. 

STEAMSHIP LINES BETWEEN 

Baltimore, Newport News, Norfolk, 
Boston and Providence, 
Baltimore and Savannah. 

Daily Service between Baltimore. Newport News and 
Norfolk. 

Accommodations and Cuisine Unsurpassed. 

Send for Illustrated Folder. 

W. P. TURNER, General Pass. Agent. 

General Offices : 604 N. Charles St., Baltimore. 

ADIRONDACK^ 

CAMP MOHAWK and Cottages 

Fourth Lake of the Fulton Chain. Patronized largely 
by families and parties of friends. Two handsome 
new cottages have been added which have very 
large rooms, fireplaces and baths, Write for booklet. 
Mention Recreation. 

MRS. H. H.lONGSTAff, Old Forge, IN.Y. 

Florida. For Sale. 

Forty acres, 210 miles south of Jacksonville, where you can 
grow a winter garden and enjoy life out of doors every day in 
the whole year; a lovely home on a hill, beautiful lake front, 
splendid boating and fishing; 500 citrus trees, orange, grape- 
fruit, lemon, lime, etc. ; lots of other fruits ; rare and beautif u 1 
ornamental trees, shrubs, vines and plants: three miles to 
railroad and county-seat. Price $4,000. A splendid invest- 
ment. Don't delay a minute. 

Address D. C. Green, Bartow, Fla. 



SOME GOOD GUIDES. 

Following are names and addresses of 
guides who have been recommended to me, 
by men who have employed them ; together 
with data as to the species of game and 
fish which these guides undertake to find 
for sportsmen,. 

If anyone who may employ one of 'these 
guides should find him incompetent or un- 
satisfactory, I will be grateful if he will 
report the fact to me : 

FLORIDA. 
C. H. Stokes, Mohawk, deer, alligators, turkey, 

quail, and snipe. 

IDAHO. 
John Ching, Kilgore, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 

mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 
Chas. Pettys, Kilgore, ditto. 

MAINE. 
H. R. Horton, Flagstaff, deer, bear, moose, cari- 
bou, fox, grouse and trout. 
Eugene Hale, Medway, ditto. 

MONTANA. 
A. R. Hague, Fridley, elk, deer, mountain sheep, 

bear, grouse and trout. 
Chas. Marble, Chestnut, ditto. 

OREGON. 

Charles H. Sherman, Audrey, bear, deer, grouse 
and trout. 

WASHINGTON. 

Munro Wyckoff, Port Townsend, deer, bear and 
grouse. 

WYOMING. 
S. N. Leek, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, mountain 
sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
CANADA. 

Carl Bersing, Newcastle, N. B., moose, caribou, 
deer, bear and grouse. 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 

John C. LeMoine, Birchy Cove, Bay of Islands, 
caribou, salmon and trout. 

A. M. Pike, Bay of Islands, bear, caribou, sal- 
mon trout. 

John Oillard, Notre Dame Bay, ditto. 

George Gillard, Little l^ay, ditto. 

He — Did you ever hear of a woman who 
didn't turn round to see what the other 
woman had on? 

She — Yes, I think so. Her name was 
Eve. — Life. 



Johnny: I wonder what we're here for? 
Little Sister : To help others. 
Then, what are the others here for? — 
Argonaut. 



Date,, 



190 



Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 23 West 24th St. New York. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which please send me RECREATION one year 



beginning with. 



.number, 



Name, 



Remit by P f 0, or Exprew Money Orger, or New York Draft. 

- ,•> DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN 






RECREATION. 



lix 



THE ECLIPSE OF SAPPHIRA. 

J. W. FOLEY IN THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

When Miss Sapphira Snodgrass read her 
graduation essay, some discerning per- 
sons present into commendation stirred, 

When its peroration ended, vowed no effort 
half so splendid had the sense of Smith- 
ville greeted or the ears of Smithville 
heard ; 

Such diction, poise and thinking! Half the 
audience was blinking tears of pride 
when Miss Sapphira bade her auditors 
farewell. 

And the way that she was showered with 
congratulations ! Bowered with bou- 
quets of rarest flowers ! Ah, 'tis not for 
me to tell ! 

"I predict," said Trustee Brewer, as he 
gave his right hand to her, "yours will 
be no common destiny — no ordinary life, 

In your essay's peroration I can see eman- 
cipation from your sex's limitations and 
a yearning for the strife." 

So 'twas all agreed and settled that she 
was so finely mettled she would take 
first place 'mong women of the self- 
assertive kind. 

And but for the limitations of her sex 
might be the Nation's Chief Executive, 
they said it, if she felt that way inclined. 

So, the eyes of Smithville seeing this su- 
perb and female being, she went forth 
into the struggle, with determination 
grim ; . 

But alas, in moment stupid, by the way 
met cunning Cupid, and oblivious to 
glory tarried there to talk with him ; 

Talked with Cupid there and tarried; all 
the dreams are fled ; she's married ; giv- 
en up her aspirations to win glory and 
renown, 

So superb and so fine fettled, all of Smith- 
ville feels sore nettled, for as plodding 
wife she's settled in a little country 
town ! 



Mrs. Schoppen : I want 5 pounds of 
sugar, please. 

Grocer: Yes'm ; anything else? 

No, that's all ; I'll take it with me if the 
package isn't too heavy. 

Oh ! it'll only weigh 3 or 4 pounds, 
ma'am. — Philadelphia Press. 



"When the airships reach that stage of 
perfection where they will be generally 
used," remarked the Observer of Events and 
Things, "a neighbor will only have to leave 
his scuttle open when he wants you to drop 
in !" — Yonkers Statesman. 



The Syracuse gun you had made for me 
gives perfect satisfaction. Recreation 
gives the best premiums of any magazine in 
America. My Yawman & Erbe reel is ex- 
cellent. I sold my premium Harrington & 
Richardson gun for $7.50. 

W. R. Wright, Hawkesbury, Ont. 



NEWHOUSE 
STEEL TRAPS 

Made since 1848 by ONEIDA COMMUNITY 




S. NEWHOUSE 

(The Old Trapper and Trapmaker) 

Fifty years ago this famous old Trapmaker of 
the Oneida Community would not let a trap 
leave his hand till he KNEW that it would hold 
any animal that got into its jaws. Even greater 
pains are taken now than then in selecting the 
finest steel and rigidly testing every part. 

This is why all experienced Trappers insist 
on having the 



4ft 



NEWHOUSE 



jj 



11 1 have seen an Indian trade his pony for one 
dozen Newhouse Traps.'' — Popular Magazine 
Writer. 



Eleven Sizes for Catching: 
Every Fur Bearing Animal 



Every Trap Guaranteed 

Illustrated Catalogue Mailed 

J^P^Send twenty-five cents for "The Trapper's Guide," 
by S. Newhouse, telling all about fur bearing animals 
and how to trap them, together with interesting nar- 
ratives and practical directions for life in the woods. 

Mention Recreation. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY 



ONEIDA 



NEW YORK 



lx 



RECREATION. 




Luger 

Automatic 

Pistol 



Capable of shooting 1 16 shots per minute. The 
best combined Pistol and Carbine in the world 
for hunting, defense and target shooting. 



Price $25.00 



Schoverling, Daly & Gales 



302-304 Broadway 



New York 



AN IMPORTANT OFFER 

For 2 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

I will send you 

A RIFLE WICK PLUG 

Made by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 30 caliber 
up to 50 caliber. 

OR 

A SHOT GUN WICK PLUG 

20 gauge up to 10 gauge 

For 3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

A Pair of Shot Gun Wick Plugs 

20 to 10 gauge. 

Sample copies for use in canvassing furnished on 
application. 

Address RECREATION, 23W. 24th St., N .Y. City 



"Your husband doesn't seem to like 
work," said the summer boarder. "That's 
where you wrong him," said the woman 
with the sunbonnet on. "He likes work, 
only he always wants it done by me or 
the girls." — Washington Star. 



Mrs. Benham — Well, if worst comes to 
worst I can keep the wolf away from the 
door by singing. 

Benham — You can if he has a correct ear 
for music. — Smart Set. 



"What is the difference between fur and 
fir?" inquired the cat of the pine tree. 

"The difference between 'u' and T re- 
plied the pine tree. — The Foolish Book. 



High Grade but not High Priced 



BAKER. GUNS 

H&mmer and H©L.mmerless 



Bviilt for Hard 

Service and to 

last a lifetime 




Send for FREE QUARTERLY and 1904 Rooklet Fully 
Describing all Grades with Prices. Mention Recreation. 

Baker Gun & Forging Co., ■&»"••. Batavia, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



lxi 



Guaranteed Not to Shoot Loose 



One of the 9 



44 



SYRACUSE 

Built for Business 



5* 



DAflASCUS BARRELS 



AUTOMATIC EJECTOR 



,; 



^1 



Grade 2 Ejector 



$46 yn 



Nothing; Fancy— Makes no pretensions to beauty. It has 
that friendly way of coming up, that makes you feel that 
you have found it at last* And Shoot ? "Well it has all 
of the " Get There " quality of the " Syracuse/' 

MADE IN 20, 16 OR 12 GUAGE 

Ask your Dealer* If he is asleep, write to 

SYRACUSE ARMS CO. Syracuse, n. y. 



Catalogue yours for the asking. 



Mention Recreation. 



1X11 RECREATION. 



Do 

You 

Want 



If so, why not get a good 
one? 

And why not get it free of 
charge? 

This is easy. 



Any old box will answer 
£] the purpose if it does not 

leak light ; but you must 
have a fine lens to make 
a fine picture. 

YOU CAIN GET 



Lens? 



A Royal Anastigmat 
Lens, 4x5, Scries No. 1, 



Made by the 

Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, New York 

And listed at $45, for 15 yearly sub- 
scriptions to RECREATION 

You can get any other lens made by this Com- 
pany on a basis of one subscription to $3 of 
the list price of the lens. 

Sample copies of Receeation for use in solicit- 
ing furnished on application. 



RECREATION. 



lxiii 





No* 7- List Price, $300*00 





Mention .Recreation. 

Write for ART CATALOG Describing Sixteen Grades Guns. $17 75 to $300.00 



lxiv RECREATION. 



DO YOU WANT A 

FOLDING 
CANVAS BOAT? 



If So, Send Me 



35 Yearly Subscriptions to 

RECREATION 



AND I WILL SEND YOU 



A 14 ft. King Folding Canvas Boat 

capable of carrying 2 men and an ordinary camp outfit. There 
are thousands of these boats in use, and nearly every man who is 
using one of them praises it on every occasion. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing will be 
furnished on application. 

Address 23 West 24th St., New York 



RECREATION. 



SAVAtPJE ^JTJFJLJES 




A GLANCE at a Savage Repeating Rifle will convince you that it is different from any 
other rifle you ever saw. Its beauty of outline and finish will always be a source of 
pleasure. Besides being the best gun to stop your game, it is the safest and simplest 
to handle and is sold to you under an honest guarantee. It will not jam or stick when you 
are in a hurry for a second shot, since accuracy and reliability are two of its particularly 
strong features, write today for catalogue G QAVATP ARMQ rn 

BAKER 4 HAMILTON. San Francisco and Sacramento, Cal.. OA V AUL AKMd l>V«f 

Pacific Coast Agents. Utica, N. Y., U. S. A. 



Sergeant — Judge, I strongly suspect the 
prisoner to be a man dressed in woman's 
clothes. 

Judge Knox — Why? 

Sergeant — She refuses to talk. — Chicago 
Chronicle. 



Employer — Yes, I advertised for a strong 
boy. Think you will fill the bill? 

Applicant — Well, I just finished lickin' 
19 other applicants out in de hall. — Phila- 
delphia Inquirer. 



Jennie, with her mother's shears 
To a point trimmed brother's ears. 
"Now," said she, no scolding fearing, 
"That will sharpen up his hearing." 

. — Cincinnati Times Star. 



Patient — I didn't expect you this morn- 
ing, doctor. 

Dr. Pillsbury Mann — I was in the neigh- 
borhood. 

Patient — Ah I see. Thought you'd kill 2 
birds with one stone. — Exchange. 



The premium Korona camera arrived safe 
and is beautiful. I am greatly obliged to 
you for it. I shall continue to get subscrip- 
tions for Recreation. 

F. L. Marshall, Pontiac, Mich. 



is 



this 



Adoring Bride — Jack, darling, 
Wednesday or Thursday? 

Doting Bridegroom — I think it's Friday, 
dearest. 

"Of this week ?"— Pathfinder. 



THE NEW LEFEVER Hig w h e ?; adeTrap and Feather - 



ght Field Cuns 




D. M. Lefever, Sons & Co 



Not connected with 
Lefever Arms Company 



Syracuse, N. Y. 



The only American makers putting on single trigger, 
guaranteed to work perfect under all conditions. 



PRICE 
$60 TO 

$400 

Send for 

1904 
Catalogue 

Mention 
RECREATION 



Ixvi 



RECREATION. 



Another Great Oiler 
to Amateur 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



a 



A 4x5 SERIES 1 KORONA 

Listed at $12.50, for 8 yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

A 5x7 SERIES 1 KORONA 

Listed at $18, for 12 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 2 KORONA 

Listed at $18 50 for 14 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 3 KORONA 

Listed at $21, for 18 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 4 KORONA 

Listed at $25, for 20 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 SERIES 5 KORONA 

Listed at $36, for 30 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 PONY PREMO, No. 1 

Listed at $12, for 7 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 CYCLE POCO, No. 6 

Listed at $12.50, for 8 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 CYCLE POCO, No. 3 

Listed at $15, for 12 yearly subscriptions. 

A 4x5 PONY PREMO, No. 4 

Listed at $24, for 20 yearly subscriptions. 



Sample Copies for use in Canvassing- 
Furnished Free 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 



23 W, 24th St., New York York City 



RECREATION. 



lxvii 



Special Bargains in Hammerless Guns 

We offer at these SPECIAL PRICES a small lot of a 

Standard American 
make Breech Load- 
ing Double Guns 




Entirely new. Made on Interchangeable 
System. Top Lever Action. Greener 
style Cross Bolt-Pistol stock. 26, 28 and 
30 inch. 12 and 16 bores, at the following 
Exceptional Prices : 



$31.00 grade G\in, fine twist 
$41.00 with Avitom&.tic Ejector 
$40.00 Damascus Barrels - 



$18.50 
$25.00 
$22.50 



Send $5.00 with order, and if Gun is 
not satisfactory on receipt it can be re- 
turned and money refunded less cost of 
expressage. If whole amount is sent with 
order a Victoria Canvas Case is included. 



Price 



Also IOO Genuirve Colt old style. Powder and 
Ball. Cavalry Revolvers, 7V 2 -irvch, round 
barrel, 44 Caliber, Brass Mounted $3.00 

Also 300 Remington ditto, same size, and in 

nice brown refinished condition 2.5 O 

Also Leather Holsters for above Pistols . SO 

Bullet Moulds (round and elongated ball) .50 



These Pistols are in nice second condition, almost as good as new. At the time of our Civil War were the 
most famous weapons of all. Are valuable, not only as relics of our Civil War. but as accurate shooting Pistols 
for target 01 defense, and all right for use to-day. Orders accompanied by cash will be filled, and if goods 
are not satisfactory on receipt, they can be returned and- money refunded, less cost of expressage. 

WM. READ & SONS, 10T Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



Established 1826. 



Send 2 stamps for full descripl ive Lists of Guns and Revolvers 



I received the Marble safety pocket axe, 
and it is the most valuable article in my 
hunting outfit. I thank you heartily for it, 
and if I have any spare time in the future 
I will gladly work for you. 

Thomas Malkin, Lansford, Pa. 



Little Clarence — Pa, why do they call 
Mr. Broadhead a walking encyclopedia? 

Mr. Callipers — Because, my son, like most 
men who are full of wisdom, he is too 
poor to own an automobile. — Town Topics. 



He — I understand that rich old maid 
married a struggling young man. 

She — Yes, he struggled, but he couldn't 
get away. — Exchange. 



She — That new boarder who came to-day 
has a beautiful olive complexion. 

He — Well, after she's been here a few 
weeks I guess she'll have a prune complex- 
ion. — Yonkers Statesman. 



Mistress — Didn't the ladies who called 
leave cards? 

Maid — They wanted to, ma'am ; but I 
told 'em yez had plenty of your own and 
better ones, too — Yonkers Herald. 



A Chicago man predicts the end of the 
world in 1924. We. haven't much faith in 
predictions of the end of the world. Verv 
few of them ever come true. — Kansas City 
Journal. 



The WONDER of the WORLD 

4-000 shot at—broKe 97 per cent. 



Fred Gilbert in his last 4000 targets has shot 97 per cent. Of Course 
this could only be accomplished with the Parker gun. Fred Gilbert 
with his Parker gun sets the pace for all others. 
The Pa-rker gun is growing better every day. ~J~end for Catalogue) 

Mention Recreation. 



PARKER. BROS. 



Meriden, Conn, 



ft. y, ^Salesrooms, 32 Warren Street 



Ixviii 



RECREATION; 



H. «, R. 

"Bicycle 

Hammerless" 

Revolver 




Description 

32 Caliber, 5 shot. 2 inch Barrel. Weight, 12 ounces. 
C. F., S. & W. Cartridge. Finish, Nickel or Blue. 

Impossible to ca.tcK on the pocket and discharge accidentally. 

Absolutely Sa.fe. Although designed for cyclists, this revolver is equally adapted 
to all cases where a small, light weight, effective and handy pocket weapon is 
desired. It has a small frame and automatic ejector. Sold direct where dealers 
will not supply. Mention Recreation when writing. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 



Ca^taJog for PostaJ 
Dept. R. * 



MaKers of H. & R. SINGLE GUNS 

WORCESTER, MASS 



PARMER TO THE PEN. 

It was reported to me that one W. O. 
Parmer had killed 224 mallard ducks in 
one day. His confession follows : 

I did kill 224 ducks, mostly mallards, at 
our club at Big lake, Ark., November 17th 
last. I have never seen such a flight as 
we had last season. On the day in ques- 
tion I had only 450 shells and fired them 
all before noon. If I had had enough 
shells I could have killed 1,000 ducks be- 
fore sundown. I was fined $25 for ex- 
ceeding the club limit, but the fine was 
remitted. If my good luck continues, I 
shall send you a pair of wild turkeys for 
your Christmas dinner. 

W. O. Parmer, Nashville, Tenn. 

If the other members of that club had 



any respect for themselves, or any desire 
to perpetuate the supply of game, they 
would expel you, give you a coat of tar 
and feathers and dump you into the nearest 
mudhole. Your number in the game hog 
book is 1044. — Editor. 



Patient — Doctor, I'll give you a thousand 
if you'll get me well without operating. 

Doctor — No ! I would lose more money in 
the long run, because this would establish 
a precedent. — Life. 



Mrs. Strongley— John, mother is coming 
to spend a week with us. 

Mr. Strongley— -Thunder and lightning! 

Mrs. Strongley— No, just reign.— Butte 
Inter-Mountain. 



Hammerless Double 
Our Latest 

DAVENPORT" 



Strictly 
High 

Grade 




Mention Recreation. 



The W. H. Davenport Fire Arms Co. 

NORWICH. CONN. 



RECREATION. 



lxix 




Robin Hood 




POWDER 




Great Penetration. Light Recoil. 



Vi. 





SHELLS 



Send for price list, discounts, and Powder Facts 
Manufactured only by 






SWANTOtf, VT. 

Mention Recreation. 




lxX 



RECREATION. 



— - -■ • - ■-■ — 




BUDWEISER is the product of 

Anheuser-Busch Brewing Ass'n 

St. Louis, U.S.A. 

You will not have seen St. Louis' Greatest Attraction if you fail to visit the Anheuser-Busch Brewery 
while attending the World's Fair. Competent guides, speaking all modern languages, in attendance. 



■ 




'ROYAL MUSKOKA!' HOTEL 

MUSKOKA .LAKES. CANADA 



— for your vacation 

Come to "beautiful Canada" — among the Muskoka 
Lakes — to the loveliest spot you have ever seen. 

New scenes, new sports and new associations — a new 
sense of life in the cool, bracing air. 

All the charm of primeval pine forests, rugged rocks and 
sparkling waters — with the luxury and comfort of the best 
American hotel. 

Muskoka is easy of access from all American points, via 
Niagara Falls, Detroit and Chicago. 

HAY FEVER UNKNOWN 

Handsomely illustrated descriptive matter free. Apply to 



G. T. BELL, 

Gen'l Pass'r & Ticket Agt., 

Grand Trunk Railway System, 

Montreal, Canada. 



ALAN F. CAMPBELL, 

OR Mgr. "Royal Muskoka" Hotel, 

Muskoka Navigation Co., 

Gravenhurst, Ont. 



"The land of lakes and islands— the Killarney of America." 




CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS, NEW YORK 




All overthe civilized world 

THE IMPROVED 

BOSTON 
BARTER 

IS KNOWN AND WORnI 

Every Pair Warranted f 

~Wi The Name is 
stamped on every 
loop — 

The 




Lies flat to the leg — never 
Slips, Tears nor Unfastens 

ALWAYS EASY 



Send 

50c. for Silk, 
25c. for Cotton, 
Sample Pair. 

REFUSE ALL SUBSTITUTES 



GEO. FROST CO., Makers, 
Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 



MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER. 
for AFTER SHAVING 




Insist that your barber use Mennen's Toilet Powder 

after he shaves you. It is antiseptic, and will PREVENT 
any of the many skin diseases often contracted. A posi- 
tive relief for PRICKLY HEAT, CHAFING, SUN- 
BURN, and all afflictions of the skin. Removes all odor 
of perspiration. Get Mennen's — the original. Sold 
everywhere, or mailed for 25 cents. Sample Free 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., NEWARK, N.J. 



Something 

.New 



Mennen's Violet Talcum K$Kf 




ED. PINAJUDS 



COOLER. 

THAN THE 

THERMOMETER. 

If fed right one can keep 
cool in hot weather. 

Try a little fruit, a 
saucer of Grape-Nuts 
and Cream, soft boiled 
egg or two, toast, POSTUM FOOD 
COFFEE (iced with dash of lemon 
if you like). This for breakfast and 
lunch (or supper). 

ALL the food elements here to 
carry one well fed, comfortable, 
vigorous and full of go through the 
hottest weather and still keep 
cool — a fact that trial easily proves. 

"There's a reason." 




EAU DE QU/JYi 

HAIR TONIC 

is a pure and infallible preparation, intended for curing all 
forms of DANDRUFF. It positively makes hair grow luxuriantly 
by keeping the scalp in healthy condition. It is furthermore an ex- 
cellent hair dressing, and the refined odor which it leaves in the haw 
makes it a toilet luxury. OVER 150,000 BOTTLES SOLD IN ONI 
MONTH IN THE UNITED STATES. 

FOR SALE EVERYWHERE 
4-oz. bottle, .50 8-oz. bottle, $1.00 j 

FREE SAMPLE mailed on receipt of 6c. to pay postage and pack- 
ing. Address Ed. Pinaud's Importation Offices, „ „ 
5th Ave. and 14th St. ED. riNAUD BLDG., H. «• 



vose 



PIANOS 



have been established over SO YEARS. Byorrsv 
tem of payments every family in moderate circui 
stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old instr 
ments in exchange and deliver the new piano in your home free of exper- 
Write for catalogue D and explanations. * 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mas 



VOLUME XXI. 
NUMBER 3 



SEPTEflBER, 1904 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




Z 

m 



Automobiling as a Sport, £ b l?*™^ 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1903, by G. O, Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted 1o Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copv 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER page. 

Visiting a Civil War Battleground in an Automobile Frontispiece 

Automobiling as a Sport. (Illustrated) J.A.Kingman 135 

'1 he Automobile Exhibit at the World's Fair. Illustrated Louis Wainwright 145 

The Hill Climbers .. 149 

An Autumn Stroll. Poem ; Samuel G. Palmer 149 

A Converted Game Butcher. Illustrated Ed. Robinson 151 

A Gamy Prelude Redleh 153 

Two Grizzlies in One Day .C. H. Barkdull 155 

Just Over the Hill. Poem CO. Woodman see 156 

A Triple Canoe Trip Hamok 158 

The First Fly on a New Stream E. Hickson 161 

How Joseph Killed the Chickens. Poem W. D. Gay 16 2 

A Western JuuO Geo. W. Luther 163 

Hunting in the Philippines J. E. Tarbell xxiv 



From the Game Fields 165 

Fisb and Fishing i7 r 

Guns and Ammunition 174 

Natural History 178 

The League of American Sportsmen 181 

Entered as Second-Class Matter a 



Forestry 183 

Pure and Impure Foods 185 

Publisher's Notes 187 

Editor's Corner 189 

Amateur Photography 196 

t New York Post Office, Oct. 17, 1894. 



MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER. 
for AFTER SHAVING 




Insist that your barber use Mermen's Toilet Powder 

after he shaves you. It is antiseptic, and will PREVENT 
any of the many skin diseases often contracted. A posi- 
tive relief for PRICKLY HEAT, CHAFING, SUN- 
BURN, and all afflictions of the skin. Removes all odor 
of perspiration. Get Mennen's — the original. Sold 
everywhere, or mailed for 25 cents. Sample Free 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., NEWARK, N.J* 



Something 
New 



Mennen's Violet Talcum StSf 



A Free Trial Bottle of 

Hydrozone 

sent on receipt of ioc. to pay 
postage. Positively relieves and 
cures Oak or Ivy Poisoning, Sun- 
burn, Prickly Heat, Hives, and 
immediately takes the sting out 
of Mosquito Bites. A marvel- 
ous remedy for burns, and will 
positively prevent blood poison- 
ing from cuts or abrasions. 

Sold by leading druggists. 

None gervviirve witKovit my signature. 



QtfcgMgfc 




F-59 Prince St., New York. 

Send for free Booklet on "How to trent 
diseases," containing hundreds of testi- 
monials of "wonderful enres. 






ii RECREATION. 



Quit Work 



for a while ! Exchange the treadmill 
of dull routine for a few days by lake 
or river, in canoe or tent, cabin or 
cottage. You will come back refreshed 
and invigorated, with an enthusiasm 
which will mean larger success. 

There's nothing like a taste of 
camping to rejuvenate a man. 

We can supply fishing, hunting, 
camping and canoeing outfits in large 
variety and of proved excellence. Drop 
in and let us talk over with you the 
choice of places, guides, and outfits; 
or send for our Catalogue "R," which 
is the next best thing to actually 
making a tour afield — it will stir 
up memories and healthy hopes 



ABERCROMBIE & FITCH 

Manufacturers of 

COMPLETE OUTFITS FOR EXPLORERS, CAMPERS 
AND PROSPECTORS 

314-316 Broadway New York 



RECREATION. 



in 



**tt.'Uflfl|5j'*r ^Jjgfl 




4 ROYAL MUSKOKA 1 HOTEL 

MUSKOKA LAKES. CANADA 



— for your vacation 

Come to "beautiful Canada" — among the Muskoka 
Lakes — to the loveliest spot you have ever seen. 

New scenes, new sports and new associations — a new 
sense of life in the cool, bracing air. 

All the charm of primeval pine forests, rugged rocks and 
sparkling waters — with the luxury and comfort of the best 
American hotel. 

Muskoka is easy of access from all American points, via 
Niagara Falls, Detroit and Chicago. 

HAY FEVER UNKNOWN 

Handsomely illustrated descriptive matter free. Apply to 



G. T. BELL, 

Gen'l Pass'r & Ticket Agt., 

Grand Trunk Railway System, 

Montreal, Canada. 



ALAN F. CAMPBELL, 

OR Mgr. "Royal Muskoka" Hotel, 

Muskoka Navigation Co., 

Gravenhurst, Ont. 



"The land of lakes and islands — the Killarney of America." 




IV 



RECREATION. 



Rare and Valuable Books 

I have for sale a few bound copies of Vol. Ill of Recreation, 
July to December, inclusive, 189^; also of Vols. IV and V, 
including the entire issues of 1896; Vols. VII, VIII, XII, 
XIII, XVI, XVII, XVIII and XIX. These are filled with in- 
teresting and valuable matter. The intervening volumes, are 
nearly all out of print, and can never be replaced at any time. 

VoL III sells at $2 

Vols. IV and V, one book, at $3 

All others $2 each 

Here are a few titles that will suggest the value of these rare books, to 

lovers of fields and sports: 

The San Juan Islands Maj. John Brooke, U.S.A. 

The Lord Eagle of the Storm......':'....... Chief Simon Pokagon. 

The Cowboy and the Wheel James B. Adams. 

Two Moose and Three Bear Dr. Hamilton Vreeland. 

Hunting Big Game with a Camera George Shiras, 3d. 

The Fight on Soppa Creek Capt. Wheeler, U.S.A. 

My Best Shot Hon. W. A. Richards, ex-Gov. of Wyo. 

A Prairie Pastoral E. L. Kellogg. 

Woodcock on the Islands F. W. G. Johnson. 

Crossing the Rockies in '61 Major W. H. Schieffelin. 

Salmon Fishing in Labrador Col. Charles E. Fuller. 

Coursing with Greyhound L. F. Bartels. 

A Bald-Faced Grizzly in Camp M. W. Miner. 

A Deer Drive with Spokane Indians Lieut. W. R. Abercrombie. 

Pheasant Shooting Thomas G. Farrell. 

Sitting Bull's Last Medicine Margaret G. Brooks. 

A Mountain Lion Hunt Dr. Robert Meade Smith. 

Trouting on Clark's Fork Gen. F. W. Benteen, U.S.A. 

A Youthful Guide and a Prize Bighorn Hon. I. N. Hibbs. 

The First Day of the Chicken Season. A. B. Cowie. 

Goose Shooting in Colorado W. E. King. 

The Cowboy's Version of the Prodigal Son Pony Bill. 

Trouting on the Thunder A. D. Curtis. 

A Bad Grizzly George W. Kellogg. 

My Wife's Moose W. E. Bemis. 

How We Photographed the Wild Cat Coyote Bill. 

Elkland E. T. Seton. 

Hunting Mountain Sheep in a Snowstorm Capt. S. A. Lawson. 

Grouse in New Hampshire Old Bill. 

Foxes in the Big Swamp C. P. Franklin. 

On the Chilkat Pass H. L. Suydam. 

A Rangeley Vacation C. J. Halpen. 

Pierre's Stratagem '. H. D. Leadbetter. 

There are many other stories in the books equally interesting. 
You should enrich your library at once by adding to it one of 
each of these rare volumes. 






RECREATION. 




FAITHFUL DOGS 

AND TWO 

FAITHFUL REMEDIES 

You can't expect lively activity and strength out of a wormy 
dog, any more than strength in a wormy piece of wood. 

Nausea, colic, pains, restlessness, fever, fits — these are all symp- 
toms of worms, all of which disappear with the administration of 

Sergeant' s Sure Shot 

50c. per Bottle 

Or take a dog suffering with any ailment common to dogdom 
— Stomach out of order, Cold or Distemper, Fever, Mange and 
General Debility or Nervousness — he needs something that will cor- 
rect the trouble at once, and then built up all the enervated organs. 

The safe, sure thing that will do this are 

Sergeant's Condition Pills 

50c. and $1.00 per Box 

Ask your Druggist for these Dog Remedies, or your Sporting 
Goods man ; if he hasn't them, send us the price, and we'll deliver 
them post-paid. 

Get our handsome Dog Book and a set of Pedigree Blanks 
free. Send address and 3 cents to cover postage. 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., Richmond, Va. 



vi RECREATION. 



Decorate Your Den 

with a set of the most beautiful 

Hunting and Fishing Pictures 

ever made. 
15 PLATES SIZE FOR FRAMING, 18x24 INCHES 

SUBJECTS : 

ELK HUNTING SALMON FISHING MOOSE HUNTING TROUT FISHING 

HY. SANDHAM 

MALLARD SHOOTING— BLACK BASS FISHING— C. E. DENTON 

TARPON FISHING— BLUE FISHING— FRED S. COZZENS 

ANTELOPE HUNTING— GOOSE SHOOTING— FRED REMINGTON 

GROUSE SHOOTING— WILD TURKEY HUNTING— R. F. ZOGBAUM 

MUSKALONGE FISHING— F. H. TAYLOR 

DEER HUNTING— A. B. FROST 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP HUNTING— E. KNOBEL 

These 15 plates are lithographed in true colors of nature, and altogether make 
one of the finest series of pictures of out-door sports ever published. 

ORIGINALLY ISSUED AT $50 A SET 

I have bought the last of them and can furnish a complete set for 1 5 yearly 
subscriptions to Recreation, 

Or will sell at $10 a Set 



f also have enlargements of the following photographs: 

RO.KY MOUNTAIN GOATS 

Published on pages 90, 91, 92 and 93 of the February, 1903, issue of Recrea- 
tion, size 8 x 10, $5 a set. 

WOOD DUCK SHOOTING 

Published on page 95 of the February issue of Recreation, size 10 x 12, 
#1.50 each. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN GOAT, male and female, size 10 x 12, price $1.50. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN GO AT, male and female, latter sitting down, size 8 x 10, price 
$1.50. 

FISHHAWK, with Dead Chicken, published in March, 1903, Recreation, size 10 x 12, 
price $1.50. 

BLACK BEAR, in Montana Pine Forest, size 10x12, price $1.50. 

COON LEAPING FROM TREE, published in March, 1903, Recreation, size 10 x 12, 
price $1.50. 



Address: RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, N. Y. City 



RECREATION. 



VII 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 



(fountain) 



FOUNTAIN 
PEN 

Guaranteed Finest 
Grade 14k. 

SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 

RECREATION 

as an advertising medium 
we offer your choice of 



foUNTAlk 



These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles 
For Only 



$1.00 

Ji. Postpaid 
y to any 

Address 



(By registered mail, 8c. extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. gold pen, 
any flexibility desired — 
in feeding device perfect. 

Either Stvle— RICHLY 
GOLD flOUNTED for 

presentation purposes, 
$1.00 extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find 
it as represented, fully 
as fine a value as you 
can secure for three times 
the price in any other 
make, if not entirely sat- 
isfactory in every respect, 
return it and we will send 
you $i.io for it, the extra 
ioc. is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
Pen — (Not one customer 
in 5,000 has asked for his 
money back.) 

Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder sent 
free of charge with each Pen 

ADDRESS ; 

Laughlin Hfg. Co. 

4-22 Griswold St., DETROIT. M ICH. 



if ' :■ 



Will Your 

Razor Do 

This? 

A well- sharpened razor should cut a 
hair held between finger and thumb 
and do it at a touch. Will yours ? If 
not you need a Torrey Strop. A razor 
cannot be kept in the best of condi- 
tion without the best strop, and the 
best strop is a Torrey Strop. No 
other strop has its wonderful sharp- 
ening qualities. Torrey Strops are 
made and guaranteed by the oldest 
and most experienced strop makers. 
They are made of the finest materials 
a^d made by a process known only 
to the Torrey makers. 

TORREY 

STROPS 

are made in all styles. Popular prices 
—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00 and 
$2.50. Sent postpaid if your dealer 
cannot supply. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. 

Torrey's Oil-Edge Dressing will 
keep any strop soft and pliable. Price 
15c at dealers, or mailed on receipt 
of price. Catalogue of Torrey Strops, 
containing valuable information for 
those who shave, sent free. 

J. R. TORREY & CO. 
P.O. Box 44, Worcester, Mass. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 





From Chicago daily, Aug. 15, to Sept. 10, inclusive. 

Correspondingly low rates from other points. 

SPECIAL TRAINS 

Personally Conducted, leave Chicago August 18 and 25 

for San Francisco via the Chicago, Union Pacific and 

North- Western Line. Stop-overs at Denver, Colorado 

Springs and Salt Lake City, with side trips at a 

minimum of expense. 

No extra charge for travel on these special trains. 

These low-rate tickets also good on fast daily trains, including The Overland 

Limited, a solid through train every day in the year, less than three 

days to the Coast, over the only double-track railway between 

Chicago and the Missouri River, via the most direct route 

across the American Continent. 




Four Trains Da.ily 

Between Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati 
and the South, via 

Monon Route and C.H.&D. 

Two Trains Daily 

Between Chicago, Louisville and West 
Baden and French Lick Springs. 

Three Trains 

Chicago to LaFayette 

Parlor Cars on Day Trains, Palace Sleep= 

ing and Compartment Cars 
on Night Trains 

FRANK J. REED CHAS. H. ROCKWELL 
Gen. Pass. Agt., Chicago Traffic Manager 



'•« QUEEN OF 5EA ROUTES." 

jnercfiants and Winers Transportation Co. 

STEAMSHIP LINES BETWEEN 

Baltimore, Newport News, Norfolk, 
Boston and Providence, 
Baltimore and Savannah. 

Daily Service between Baltimore, Newport News and 
Norfolk. 

Accommodations and Cuisine Unsurpassed. 

£end for Illustrated Folder. 

W. P. TURNER, General Pass. Agent. 
General Offices : 604 N. Charles St , Baltimore. 



RECREATION. 



IX 




| 6 Fine Souvenir Teaspoons $1.50 

Qge of the most pleasing souvenirs of the World's Fair, St. Louis, is the set of six teaspoons, made especially to 

order for the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway by the Oneida Community. Each bowl contains an 

engraving of a different World's Fair building, and the handles are handsomely engraved. The spoons are made 

of best material, finely finished and fully guaranteed, and are thoroughly serviceable for everyday use, 

if desired. Do not fail to order a set. You will be pleased with the spoons. 

HOW to Order. Entire set will he sent, post-paid, in satin-lined box for $1.50 (to Canadian points 

— — — — ^- — — $i.75J. Remit by express or postoffice money order direct to 

Oneida Community, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

For really pleasant, comfortable journeys between the East and St. Louis, use the Lake Shore. It affords 
the most complete service of any line. Send two-cent stamp for World's Fair folder and boarding house list to 

A. J. SMITH, G. P. & T. A., Cleveland, Ohio. 




<r> 






THE 

RIDEAU 

LAKES. 



The Rideau River, lakes and canal, 
a unique region, comparatively un- 
known, but affording the most novel 
experience of any trip in America. 
An inland waterway between the St. 
Lawrence River at Kingston and the 
Ottawa River at Ottawa ; every mile 
affords a new experience. It is briefly 
described in No. 34 of the "Four- 
Track Series," "To Ottawa, Ont., 
Via the Rideau Lakes and River;" 
issued by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL 



A copy will be mailed free on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp, by George H. Daniels, General Passenger 
Agent, Grand Central Station, New York. 



For HUNTERS, ANGLERS, 
PROSPECTORS, RANCHMEN 



and all others who go 
into the Woods or Hills 



The Press 
Button 



Knife \ 



s the 
thing 




One-half actual size 

Our 5-inch Press Button Hunting Knife can 
not be excelled. Can be opened with one 
hand, and will not open or close accidentally 

Send for Catalogue for descrip- 
tion and prices of other styles 

Mention Recreation. 

Handsome Stag r)/\^T 
Handle, Price VUC. 

National Cutlery Company 



WALDEN, 



NEW YORK 



X 



RECREATION. 




II 



II 



YandE 
Automatic 
Reels- 

Built to stand the strain of 



catching Fish that are 
worth while 





<$ When you 
put a "Y and E" 
Reel in your kit and go miles from 

finger f^/$^r»n-' ^ e nearest P ost °ffi ce > y° u can rest assured that 
does \\ Y«%JfS»M ■ your Reel won't leave you in the lurch. 

IT! W*. *^«*!# ■ '' 

<I The action of a "Y and E n Reel is so smooth, 
gentle and consistent that it makes no difference whether you hook a little fellow 
or a big one — THE REEL WILL DO ITS WORK equally well in either case. 

^ No other Reel has the n Y and E ■ free-running 
feature — press a slide and your Reel is FREE- 
RUNNING— to make your cast— or AUTOMATIC 
— to rewind your line, or to apply tension in 
case you get a strike. 

t| You needn't worry about SLACK — a 

1 Y and E " Automatic Reel takes full care of 

that and leaves you free to give your whole 

attention to the playing of your gamy fighter. 

€J Write today for our handsome new 
booklet No. 113 — "When Pardner Was 
Mascot n — the exciting story of the 
biggest Rainbow Trout ever landed. 

BOOKLET 113 SENT POSTPAID 

ON YOUR REQUEST 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




RECREATION. 



XI 




Pound for Pound the Small Mouth 

Black Bass is the gamiest fish that swims. 

Ounce for ounce the "BRISTOL" 
is the gamiest rod that swings. 

When a "Bristol" Rod and a Black Bass get together, you 
may imagine there's going to be considerable excitement for the 
man behind the Rod. 

The "Bristol" is so light and flexible, Mr. Bass thinks he 
can walk right away with it, but the " Bristol " always comes 
out ahead. 

PRICES REDUCED 

ASK YOUR, DEALER. ABOUT IT 

ASK US FOR. CATALOG "D" 

The Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., U.S.A. 



xn 



RECREATION. 




Ar\ything Thad's Knit 







- - 

mm 




BLAUVELT'S 



Hunting and Fishing 

COATS 

THE BEST THAT'S MADE 

In Oxford Grey or Dead Grass, or 
any other color or combination of colors, 
made to your measure. 

Sweaters of all kinds — for Men, 
Women, Boys and Girls. The correct 
and comfortable garment for the seashore, 
country or mountains. 



Mail Orders Trompily 
^/Ittended to 

Mention Recreation 

BLAUVELT KNITTING CO. 

148 and 150 Central Ave. Newark, N. J. 



BLAUVELT'S HUNTING AND FISHING COAT 
Good Agents Wanted 



RECREATION. 



xin 



RACINE BOAT MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

- MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN ===== 




Our Turbine Motor Hunting Boat, as shown above, is 16 feet long, draws loaded only 
lOinchesof water, is fitted with our 3 H.P. motor and underwater exhaust. No springs, no 
valves, no clicks — as noiseless as a Row Boat. Speed 6 miles per hour. Operation and 
satisfaction guaranteed for $275. Cheaper ones if you want them. 




Our Canvas Cedar Paddling Canoe, as shown above, is 14 feet long, will carry four in 
apinch and is built for service. A comfortable and easy paddler. Price, F. 0. B., $30— 
no extras. 




Our Still Hunter, as shown, 1 1 ]/z feet long, 
36 inches wide, built of White Cedar, will 
carry 600 lbs., weight only 80 lbs. Ample 
room under deck for decoys. Light weight, 
light draught, very stiff, very still and very 
cheap. Price, complete with paddle $20, 
F.O.B. 



Our 15 foot Fishing Motor Boat is the 
"limit." Has c 4 foot beam, draws 12 inches, 
speed 6 miles per hour, seats four to 
five, will carry. 1,000 lbs. 1 H.P. motor, 
operation guaranteed. Built of Cedar, nat- 
ural finish, brass trimmed, a good troller, a 
good guide to the fishing grounds and a sure 
returner. We have them in stock at our 
various warehouses — price $165. Money refunded if not satisfied. 

Send ?0g. for our 64 page catalog describing the others, and we will tell you the 
address of our nearest showrooms. If you haven't the stamps handy drop a postal. 

Mention Recreation. 

Address: RACINE BOAT MEG. CO., (Riverside) MUSKEGON, MICH. 




XIV 



RECREATION. 




RECREATION. xv 



A Trunk of Special Interest 
to Jobbers and Manufacturers of Fire Arms 

I have designed and am now making a 
trunk adapted for carrying fire arms. 

It will stand all kinds of use and abuse by- 
baggage smashers, and will come home in 
good shape— and the guns will not have a 
scratch on them. The trunk is built as 
strong, and ironed and locked as securely, 
as any sample trunk made. 

Holds any number of guns desired from 
two up. 

You can get any gun in the trunk without having to unpack, I am also building a 
trunk adapted to the use of individual sportsmen, to carry two, four or more guns as 
maybe desired, with compartments for shells, hunting cloths, golf clubs, etc. Sports- 
men's trunks built only on order. State number and kind of guns you wish to carry; 
also number of shells and whether you wish to carry golf clubs and fishing tackle, etc 

Q-uns cannot be injured while in the trunk. 

For illustrated, descriptive circular mention Recreation and address 

E. M. CRENSHAW 

52 North Fourth Street - - PhiBadeBphia, Pa. 




Kenwood SLEEPING BAGS and RUGS 

ANEW use for Kenwood Sleeping Bags and Kenwood 
Rugs has been found by people taking open air treat- 
ment for tuberculosis or other troubles. A chief 
necessity is the perfect protection of the patient's body day 
and night from draughts and colds while in the open air. 
Nothing compares with Kenwood Bags and Rugs for this 
purpose. They are used in this way in sanitariums and by 
individuals all over the country. Send us your address and let 
us tell you more about this. Our illustrated booklets and 
samples will interest you. Write us at once. Mention 
Recreation. 



The Kenwood Mills, Albany, N. Y. 



XVI 



RECREATION. 



^^m^m^m^m^^ 






i 



COUNT GASSINI SAYS: 

Russian Imperial Embassy, Washington. 
The HAYNER WHISKEY which has been used at the Russian 
Embassy has given universal satisfaction. ^vu^Uy crrf^T) 

It is an admirable household whiskey. /^n 



Russian Ambassador. 



THE ONLY WHISKEY WITH A NATIONAL REPUTATION FOR 
HIGHEST QUALITY AND PERFECT PURITY. 

Government statistics show that the famous Miami Valley produces better grain and 
has purer water than any other section of this country. It is Nature's garden. Right in 
the heart of this favored spot is our distillery. We have at our very door the two essen- 
tials for producing the finest whiskey in the world-the best grain and the purest water. 
Add to these one of the most completely equipped distilleries ever operated and an ex- 
perience of 38 years in distilling whiskey and you have a combination that is unequaled 
anywhere. That's why HAYNER WHISKEY is the best for medicinal and other uses. That's 
why we have over half a million satisfied customers. That's why YOU should try it. 
Don't forget that it goes direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, 
richness and flavor, carries a UNITED STATES REGISTERED DISTILLER'S GUARANTEE of PURITY and 
AGE and saves the dealers' enormous profits. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

FULL QUARTS $ 

EXPRESS CHARGES PAID BY US. 

MID nCCEQ We wiU send y° u F0UR FULL Q UART BOTTLES of HAYNER SEV2N- 
Ulm UrrCn YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20. and we will pay the express charges. 
Try it and if you don't find it all right and as good as you ever used or can buy 
from anybody else at any price, then send it back at our expense and your 
$3.20 will be returned to you by next mail. Just think that offer over. How 
could it be fairer? If you are not perfectly satisfied you are not out a cent. 
We ship in a plain sealed case, no marks to show what's inside. 

Orders for Ariz., Cal.. Col., Idaho. Mont.. Nev..N. , Mex.. Ore., Utah., Wash., or Wvo. 
must be on the basis of 4 QUARTS for $4.00 by EXPRESS PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by 
FREIGHT PREPAID. 




t 
f 
f 




ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY 
TROY, OHIO. 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO., ST. PAUL, MINN., ATLANTA, GA., 



HATNERS 

SEVEN YEAH 01* 



33^i^3^te£?£3£?te^te^>*a0?$a£? 






w 

PQ 
O 

c 

H 
P 

< 

g 

n 
o 

w 

H 
H 

< 



< 



< 
H 

M 

w 

I— I 

> 



N 




134 



Volume XXI, 



RECREATION. 

SEPTEMBER, 1904 
G. 0. SHIELD* ! >■ ~1"SA), Editor and Manager 



Number 3 



AUVC LlOBILING AS A SPORT. 

J. A. KINGMAN. 



The craze for me vehicles which 
is now 3 or 4 ye?,, j old and steadily 
growing, is justified not only by the 
utility of the automobile, but by its 
peculiar fitness as a health-giving and 
pleasure-giving device. The question 
has often been raised as to whether 
fondness for automobiling will decline 
as the fad for bicycling did ; but when 
we consider the vast difference be- 
tween the motor car and the bicycle it 
is really not logical to compare them. 
It is much more reasonable to com- 
pare the automobile with the horse- 
drawn vehicle. When this is done it 
is not fair to assume that the automo- 
bile will go out of style or fall into 
disuse any more than will vehicles 
drawn by horses. 

The automobile is a purely 20th cen- 
tury product, and its coming almost 
exactly with the century marks a 
new era in road transportation. This 
is an age of machinery and mechani- 
cal effects, and the automobile is one 
of the most interesting of modern ma- 
chines, all of which are destined to 
annihilate something. Most machines 
annihilate time and expense. The au- 
tomobile annihilates distance. The 
automobile sometimes annihilates per- 
sons and property, but serious acci- 
dents have been few, when the 
number of automobiles in use by all 
sorts of persons is considered. There 
are probably 40,000 of these machines 
in operation in this country at present. 

Many people think none too highly 
of the new form of road vehicle. Some 
of these are horse lovers, but most of 
them are people who have little fond- 
ness for mechanical matters. There 
are many people in this country who 



would like to own and operate auto- 
mobiles, but who have not the taste 
or liking for machinery which they 
should have in order to own and oper- 
ate a car. The automobile is a deli- 
cate machine which requires great 
care and attention. 

Some of the owners of automobiles 
who have had the best success are 
men who have bought their cars with 
a clear understanding of their own 
inexperience, and who have attacked 
the problem armed solely with the 
simple weapons of carefulness and 
common sense. On the other hand, 
some of the poorest performances of 
automobiles have been the result of 
operation in the hands of mechanical 
"know-it-alls," who, though sufficient- 
ly well trained in mechanical matters, 
have thought it unnecessary to give 
their cars proper care and attention, 
or who have continually meddled with 
the machinery, trying to make it better 
than it was when it came from the 
factory. 

This statement is not intended to 
encourage those who are hesitating 
about automobiling, but it is a fact 
that the man who is constantly look- 
ing for trouble and trying to prevent 
it, is likely to have little, and that the 
man who never "knocks wood" and 
who knows it all, is likely to pay 
out more money each year for repairs 
than his less educated neighbor who 
applies business methods to his pleas- 
ure vehicle. 

These are strenuous times, and the 
automobile is a strenuous plaything. 
It has great power concealed about its 
person, and the application of this 
power must be made in the right way. 



135 



136 



RECREATION. 



Those operators who have run their 
machines several years and who can 
show clean scores for freedom from 
important breakages and accidents, 
brought about by recklessness or care- 
lessness, are the true automobilists, 
the people who are doing the most to 
further a good cause. 

Let it not be forgotten then that 
the automobile is a machine ; and its 
limitations become obvious when it 
falls into the hands of a person who 
will not or can not give it some of his 
own brains. 



may engage. A man told me the 
other day that the best way to make 
a man of a boy was to make him sail 
a yacht. To teach him to run an auto- 
mobile will help him even more. 

Is automobiling a sport? Some en- 
thusiastic horsemen say no; but, as 
the years go by, and the field of the 
motor car widens, the time will come 
when automobiling will be recognized 
as one of our leading sports, and will 
be enjoyed accordingly. Automobil- 
ing is a sort of natural concomitant 
to many other sports. A man drives 




CLIMBING MT. SNUWDUN, WALES, IN A GASOLINE RUNABOUT OE AMERICAN MAKE. 
THE CAR WAS DRIVEN UP THE MOUNTAIN OVER THE COG ROAD. 



The fact that the automobile is a 
machine and that it is coming into 
popular use is important, because the 
general use of machinery has educat- 
ed many people and made them ready 
for automobiles. The use of the auto- 
mobile will educate thousands of other 
people. 

In order to run a machine a man 
must know it thoroughly, and no mat- 
ter how little he may learn he is ob- 
taining a fund of useful information 
which, in these days of machinery, 
will aid in equipping him for any 
business or profession in which he 



his automobile to the race track, the 
polo field, or to the traps ; one sport 
beginning where the other leaves off. 
We all know the inaccessibility of the 
average golf club for the city dweller. 
What better way to go and return than 
by an automobile ? The fact is that the 
car can cover more ground in a day 
than a horse and carriage can, brings 
good fishing grounds nearer to a man's 
home, and enables him to tour through 
the country in the fall, trying the 
shooting here and there, — wherever he 
may wish to go. 

In some respects the automobile 



AUTOMOBILING AS A SPORT. 



137 



may be compared to a yacht. The 
former is a sort of land cruiser and 
the good or bad conditions of the road 
correspond to calm seas or rough, high 
tides or low. In both cases the swift 
motion through the air exhilarates and 
gives health. In fact, automobiling 
might even be considered a better 
sport than yachting, for it is so useful 
in ordinarv life and is so closely 



tie reason to suppose that its popular- 
ity will ever diminish. 

It may be well to consider here the 
3 motive powers in general use in 
automobile building. 

Electric automobiles are decidedly 
satisfactory for use in the City or sub- 
urbs because they are almost entirely 
noiseless. They can be left alone any- 
where and are ready for immediate 




AN ASCENT OF LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN. THE FAMOUS MOCCASIN BEND IN THE 

DISTANCE. 



connected with many other sports. 
The automobile benefits tennis, golf, 
fishing and hunting ; and is much 
used as an enjoyable means of trans- 
porting people from crowded cities to 
the suburban yacht club houses. In 
other words a man may go yachting 
on land and yachting on water the 
same day. Such are the times we live 
in ! It is little wonder, then, that the 
automobile is popular, and there is lit- 



use when the owner returns. Further- 
more their operation is extremely 
simple ; but we are waiting for a 
cheap, durable, long distance battery, 
and until that is brought out, if it ever 
can be, the electric car can hardly be 
classed among sporting automobiles. 
It is not suited for trips and tours in 
its present stage. 

Steam cars, like electric machines, 
are noiseless and free from vibration, 



i3» 



RECREATION. 



and, although steam vehicles have not 
been so popular for the last few sea- 
sons as gasolene automobiles have 
been, yet as a motive power, steam 
has so many excellent advantages that 
it is safe to say it will always be used 
to some extent in pleasure cars. 

The average man is apt to look on 
the steam machine as a miniature loco- 
motive, and to feel that he must be 
an engineer in order to run it. This 
is an error. The operation of a steam 
car is a simple matter. There are no 
complications attending the changing 
of speed, going up or down hill, as in 
the case of a gasolene car; the boiler 
requires no attention except to keep it 
properly supplied with water. Liquid 
fuel is almost entirely automatic in its 
use. You pour so much gasolene in 
the tank, and the gasolene feed takes 
care of itself. Steam cars were uni- 
versally popular in this country before 
gasolene cars began to be developed 
into good reliable machines, a develop- 
ment which has been extremely rapid. 
For the last 2 years and up to the 
present time the gasolene machine has 
enjoyed a great popularity. 

The gasolene type of automobile 
possesses many distinct advantages, 
and its remarkable improvement in 
the last few years is certainly gratify- 
ing. Many people had thought gaso- 
lene cars could never be made so that 
they would not vibrate unpleasantly 
or make unnecessary noise. Many 
people thought that for these and other 
reasons the gas engine was not best 
suited for the automobile ; that the 
smell from the exhaust ; the racking 
effect produced by the vibration ; the 
difficulty of gearing up the inelastic 
motor with the driving wheels, were 
all problems too great to solve, and 
that the electric or the steam runabout 
would be the car of the future. 

The development of the gasolene 
motor has been remarkably rapid. The 
employment of a number of cylinders 
instead of one, increases the flexibility 
of the motor; reduces the vibration; 
makes the engine easier to start; and 
reduces the risk of breakdown. In 



other words a machine with 4 cylin- 
ders has not only aesthetic advantages 
over the single cylinder motor, but is 
much more reliable. 

Great improvements have been 
made on single and double cylinder 
engines used in light cars, and it 
should be remembered that the in- 
crease in the number of cylinders 
means some increase in complication; 
but in a general way it is believed that 
the future of the gasolene engine for 
automobiles lies in the 4 cylinder 
motor. 

Whether a man buys a steam auto- 
mobile, or a gasolene, or an electric, he 
should purchase wisely. I have been 
connected with the industry since its 
beginning in this country, and have 
had occasion to see how a great many 
people buy automobiles. A few words 
of advice, therefore, may well be set 
down here. 

In the first place do not wait until 
you are ready to use a machine before 
ordering it. This is a frequent mis- 
take. 

Do not make up your mind about 
the motive power until you have in- 
vestigated all. If you have been fa- 
miliar with steam apparatus all your 
life and want a cheap car, a steam 
runabout is to be recommended, es- 
pecially if you live in the country and 
do not want to make long trips. If 
the desire for touring, even in a run- 
about, is strong, a gasolene machine 
would be more suitable, for some of 
the small single cylinder or double 
cylinder runabouts are well suited for 
long distance running, being very 
economical in the use of gasolene, and 
requiring few or no stops to take 
water. 

The gasolene car will use less fuel 
than a steam car, but the latter does 
not have any electrical equipment to be 
maintained, and in a sense, batteries, 
spark coils, and induction coils may 
be considered as fuel, for they have 
nothing to do with the running of the 
car. They are only put on the car to 
make electricity for the spark which 
fires the charge of mixed gasolene and 




A MOUNTAIN RACE. 



ONE OF THE COMPETING CARS CLIMBING MT. 
IN THE RECENT CONTEST. 



WASHINGTON 



air in the cylinder. If a man decides 
to get a gasolene car rather than a 
steam car, simply because one uses 
less fuel than another, he should cer- 
tainly take into consideration the fact 
that the cost of maintaining the elec- 
trical equipment for a year should 
be added to the cost of gasolene 
before any comparison with the 
fuel consumption in a steam car is 
made. 

In buying an automobile one should 
be governed by quality rather than by 
anything else. If you can not tell 
good machinery when you see it, get 
some friend who can. Have him look 
over the car you have in mind and 
pass judgment on it, not so much on 
its design as on the manner in which 
the design is carried out. 

It is fairly safe to say that a man 
going to any well known automobile 
builder in this country will get a ma- 
chine that will run well ; but that is not 



the only consideration. Another ques- 
tion is, how long will it run? It is 
the little things that count in auto- 
mobiling ; the big little things that the 
novice does not know about and that 
if not attended to properly in manu- 
facture will certainly mar the pleasure 
of the automobilist. 

It is much more important for the 
purchaser to know that his engine is 
equipped with a good crank shaft and 
that it has really good bearings and 
accessible machinery throughout than 
it is to fight for a lot of extras and 
a trade discount and 16 other things. 
No automobile is good unless its in- 
sides are the best. There is no bar- 
gain in getting a poor automobile at 
any price. 

Under certain conditions automo- 
biles depreciate rapidly, and many 
second hand cars are offered for sale 
which are in bad condition. If you 
think of buying a second hand ma- 




EDUCATING A HORSE TO THE AUTOMOBILE. 
139 



140 



RECREATION. 



chine here is another opportunity to 
call on your mechanical friend. He 
can probably set you right on this 
point. It will pay you to consult him. It 
would be still better if you buy a sec- 
ond-hand machine to get it direct from 
the firm who made it. Even if such 
houses do not have second hand ma- 
chines for sale, they can frequently 
offer good suggestions and put you in 
the way of getting a car which they 
could recommend, at a fairly low price. 
Many people hesitate to buy second 
hand cars, but, at the same time, it is 
a good plan in certain cases. Many 
people who are now enjoying auto- 
mobiling, could never have had the 
opportunity except by buying at a low 
figure. How much more sensible to 
do this than to get a machine which 
may run no better than a good second 
hand car which has been operated 
carefully, and which the owner is giv- 
ing up in order to get a larger and 
higher priced vehicle ? 

Here let me mention briefly some of 
the troubles of automobile owners and 
how to overcome them. 

Rubber tires often figure prominent- 
ly on repair bills, and the whole tire 
problem requires careful attention. A 
sharp nail or tack will put an automo- 
bile out of business as effectually as if 
the whole engine had fallen out of the 
machine. The almost general use of 
the double tube tire, of course, renders 
it possible to effect roadside repairs in 
fairly quick time, although delays of 
this kind are always annoying, and a 
run of hard luck with tires is apt to 
sow the seed of disgust in the heart of 
the automobilist. If any one thing 
stands in the way of getting a reliable 
automobile, it is the matter of tires, 
and a great deal of responsibility rests 
on the tire makers, yet the average 
automobilist gives little or no attention 
to his tires until he has trouble with 
them. The simplest rules sent out by 
the tire makers receive scant attention. 
Not one automobilist in 10 follows 
them. Here are a few simple direc- 
tions which should be observed. 

I. Pump up your tires, and always 



keep them firm. If a tire is the least 
soft, it is much more likely to pick up 
a nail or a tack than if it be hard and 
firm. Further than this, the tire is so 
made that it will best withstand the 
shocks of the road when pumped up 
so hard that the weight of the ma- 
chine will cause it to take the theo- 
retical shape for best conditions. 

2. Avoid getting oil or gasolene on 
the tires, as both have a destroying 
effect on rubber. 

3. Jack up the car when not in use, 
so as to remove unnecessary strain 
from the tires. 

4. Wash the tires occasionally with 
water, so as to remove any grit which 
may have got into scratches or cuts. 
It will readily be seen that the outer 
surface of the tires will wear rapidly 
if sand gets into any portion of the 
surface which has been gashed by a 
sharp stone. 

5. Favor the tires when running on 
bad roads. Do not drive rapidly over 
car tracks or portions of the road 
where broken stone has been laid or 
stone not rolled. Many a puncture 
is directly traceable to careless driving 
of the car, and, if you want to keep 
your* repair bill down you should 
give to the tires the attention they 
require. 

Lubrication is another important 
matter, and is one which is seldom at- 
tended to properly. A new car should 
be oiled liberally so that the bearings 
and wearing surfaces will get into 
fine glassy condition. If you have a 
gasolene automobile, you do the en- 
gine no harm by giving it too much 
oil, except perhaps by coating the 
points of the spark plugs ; but you 
may damage it seriously by not giv- 
ing it enough oil. 

After the car has been run a while, 
the bearings get filled with dirty oil, 
containing particles of grit and steel, 
and the only way to prevent undue 
wear is to wash out this residue oc- 
casionally and replenish with fresh 
oil. 

The life of the bearings and wear- 
ing surfaces of a car may be cut down 



AUTOMOBILING AS A SPORT 



141 



materially by neglecting- this treat- 
ment. 

The same is true of the chain or 
chains, if such are used. These should 
be removed occasionally, cleaned in a 
pan of kerosene oil, and afterward 
immersed in lubricating oil. Then 
wipe dry and replace, lubricating with 
a little graphite, but not too much, so 
as to make dirt adhere to the chains 
and cause wear. 

For an inanimate object an automo- 
bile is peculiarly responsive to little 
attentions of this kind, and a man who 
will keep his car tuned up, as it is 
called, all the time, will save money, 
time and trouble. No matter how 
carefully the various parts are secured,' 
the shocks from rough roads are con- 
stantly tending to shake off the bolts, 
nuts and cotter pins, and a little in- 
spection now and then will save a 
great deal of unnecessary expense. 

The steering connections require 
frequent attention, for the safety of 
the passengers depends so much on 
this part of the car. Wearing parts 
should be oiled, and connections ex- 
amined frequently. There are a lot 
of odd jobs to be done about an auto- 
mobile that are often distasteful and 
in fact it is these very jobs that 
have created the chauffeur. Many 
people do not like to turn machinists 
or repair men, and even if they find 
such tinkering pleasant they have 
not time for it. At the same 
time a man owning a small car does 
not need to give it the attention that 
a larger car requires, and with little 
trouble can do the greater part of his 
own work, leaving the rest to be done 
by the attendants at the garage where 
he may be storing it, or by his gar- 
dener or coachman. 

It is interesting to note that many 
of the latter class, with little training 
and instruction, can be of valuable as- 
sistance ; for there is nothing mysteri- 
ous about an automobile after all. It 
is a stupid man who can not keep the 
gasolene tank filled, the body work 
clean and the machinery well oiled. It 
would be a stupid man indeed who 




A MOTOR CAR AT GLACIER POINT, 
YOSEMITE PARK. 

could not keep adjusted the little parts 
which require occasional adjustment, 
who could not inspect regularly the 
various connections, and, in short, at- 
tend to 99 out of 100 of the various 
little things which must be done in 
order to keep an automobile running 
at its best. Some men go so far as not 
to run their cars at all, leaving this 
as well as the maintenance entirely 
in the hands of the driver. This 
is not so uncommon as might be sup- 
posed. It seems a great pity that any- 
one should give over the best part of 
the sport to somebody else. The oper- 
ation of the automobile is a liberal 
education in many ways, and in addi- 
tion to this the thrill of conducting a 
swift motor car over beautiful roads, 
seems to me one of the principal rea- 
sons for wanting to own an automo- 
bile. Such persons, of course, are not 




RETURNING FROM A RABBIT HUNT IN PENNSYLVANIA. 



the true automobilists, but the time 
will come when even such cases will 
be rare and the man who owns an 
automobile and who does not drive it 
will be a curiosity. 

Going at a high rate of speed in 
an automobile is poor sport for those 
who have never done much of it ; but 
that it has intense fascination for the 
habitue there is no doubt, and much 
of the agitation over the infraction of 
speed regulations by automobilists is 
absurd. 

On a recent 600 mile trip of a com- 
mittee from the New York State Sen- 
ate, it was proven to a number of 
legislators, who have had more or less 
to do with drastic automobile speed 
laws, that an automobile going at 20 
miles an hour is safer than a horse 
going at 8 miles an hour. There is 
absolutely no doubt as to the truth of 
this statement. 

High power machines are built not 
for the purpose of scorching on pub- 



lic highways ; but for the purpose 01 
enabling the owner to ascend steep 
grades without having to slow down 
too much, or without having tc 
change gears unnecessarily. A car 
that has a great deal of power in pro- 
portion to its weight is a desirable 
form of automobile because the en- 
gines do not have to work hard most 
of the time, and the wear and tear 
is, therefore, less. Again, if the ma- 
chinery be not working particularly 
well at any time, there is always a re- 
serve of power on which to draw. 
High power, then, is not at all a bad 
thing, even if it does allow a speed 
which is unsafe. 

Of course it is not to be understood 
that there is any justification for run- 
ning an automobile on a public road 
at a high rate of speed, but at the 
same time in France and Germany 
numerous long distance road races 
have been held which have been of 
great value to the automobile manu- 




THE START OF A TRACK RACE FOR HIGH-POWER RACING AUTOMOBILES. 

142 



AUTOMOBILING AS A SPORT 



143 



facturers in helping them to improve 
their product as well as in advertising 
their wares. 

A member of the Automobile Club 
of America said that of 2 automobiles 
starting from one place together, the 
best is the one that gets there first; 
and there is something in this. High 
speed is a fine test of constructional 
merit and inasmuch as racing means 
high speed, it is to be condoned in a 
measure for the good it has done 
abroad. 

The Vanderbilt Cup race, to be held 
this fall, is almost the first long auto- 
mobile road race to be held in this 
country, and the fact that it may in- 
convenience a few people on Long 
Island, should be no valid objection to 
it, or to any similar race that may 
hereafter be held, if there be any 
chance of its improving the automo- 
bile or improving American roads, bad 
as these are known to be. Doubtless, 
in the future, automobile racing will 
be confined to special tracks of good- 
ly size, where the turns are so gradual 
that there will be little danger of skid- 
ding or upsetting, and where, in case 
of accident, the loss of life, or injury 
to persons or property, will be the 
lowest possible. 

A race between high power ma- 
chines is extremely fascinating. This 
is proven by the big crowds that at- 




CROSSING AN ARIZONA DESERT WITH A STEAM 
RUNABOUT. 

tend these exhibitions now given on 
tracks made for horse racing, the sur- 
faces of which are undesirable for 
automobiling, not being of a suitable 
size or shape. • 

That the automobile is going to dis- 
place the horse entirely is an absurd 
prediction, especially when the sport- 
ing phase of automobiling is con- 
sidered. A man, if he can afford it, 
will have both horses and motor cars, 
if he likes them, as well as a yacht and 
other articles destined to give pure 
enjoyment. As well say that sail 
boats are doomed because auto 
launches, so called, are becoming 
popular. It is not likely we shall see 
horsemen turn automobilists, nor auto- 
mobilists turn horsemen. A man who 
is both ought to be the best company. 



Mrs. Black — "I dreamed the other night 
about a beautiful red automobile, and when 
I told my husband about it, what do you 
suppose he did? 

Mrs. Green — "Oh, did he take the hint 
and buy you a car?" 

Mrs. Black — "No. He presented me with 
a dream book." — Exchange. 




u 

o 

i — i 

O 

H 

C/3 

P 

O 

u 

< 

C/3 



144 



THE AUTOMOBILE EXHIBIT AT THE WORLD'S FAIR. 



LOUIS WAINWRIGHT. 



The automobile exhibit at the World's 
Fair is one of the most popular features 
in the immense transportation building. 
At the Chicago exposition u years ago 
there was no such department as the horse- 
less carriage section, yet here are over 75,- 
000 square feet of floor space devoted to 
American and foreign motor cars of every 
size and price, from heavy auto trucks to 
the lightest of runabouts. In some booths, 
early inventions stand beside the newest 
models. 

The luxurious railway passenger coaches 



building is divided into 2 parts, the Ameri- 
can and the foreign. The former has a 
distinctively American decorative scheme 
which thousands of visitors admire. The 
walls of this part of the building are cov- 
ered with red and green burlap to the 
height of 12 feet, and above that white and 
yellow bunting hangs on the walls and is 
draped gracefully from the ceiling. Thus 
the unsightly rafters and framework are 
hid by a jaunty covering, and gilt panels 
on the green and red burlap produce a dig- 
nified setting for the handsome aiftomo- 




RAMBLERS AT THE ST. LOUIS 



in a neighboring section do not show more 
radical changes from the lumbering stage 
coaches of 1831, clumsily put on rails and 
propelled by a locomotive, than do the 
superb tonneaus exhibited with the auto- 
mobiles of early design. The automobile 
of a few years ago was a horseless car- 
riage and nothing more ; what it has been 
evolved into is seen in the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition's display. The motor car 
of to-day is a miniature palace car where 
occupants ride as princes. In one foreign 
touring machine, among a score of new 
accessories is a writing table which may be 
unfolded and the tourist may write while 
he scorches ! 

In all there are 39 booths and over 200 
automobiles exhibited at the Fair. The 
automobile section in the transportation 



biles. Down the 2 main aisles, 20 feet 
broad and 650 feet long, are white and 
gold standards which carry brass signs 
done in fretwork, giving the names and 
makes of motor cars. 

The exhibit of automobiles which is made 
by the National Association of Automobile 
Manufacturers is arranged differently from 
former shows. Heretofore each maker pre- 
pared his individual exhibit, and the result 
was a conglomeration of decoration ; the 
space allotted was not equal, nor the loca- 
tions alike to all makers. A number of 
manufacturers in former exhibits had to 
take spaces comparatively small and in poor 
locations, in which case the showing was not 
satisfactory to the maker or typical of the 
magnitude of his business. 

At the World's Fair a new plan is in 



i45 



146 



RECREATION. 



operation. The exhib- 
its of all the members 
are in one fair group. 
In the American sec- 
tion this group covers 
over 40,000 square 
feet, or nearly 80 per 
cent, of the entire 
auto sections. No 
one manufacturer ar- 
ranges his decorative 
effects according to 
h i s individual taste, 
but the whole space 
is laid out as one, and 
the rugs, signs, furni- 
ture, and everything 
necessary to an impos- 
ing display is installed by the Association. 
There was no attempt to prepare anything 
tawdry or obtrusive, but the setting is dig- 
nified, as becomes the industry. All the 
exhibitors had to do was to bring their 
cars. They, have co-operated in every way 
with the Association and the cleanness of 
the place is remarkable. There is an entire 
absence of gasoline oil, or anything that 
would stain the polished floors, strewn with 
rich oriental rugs. The Automobile ex- 
hibit unites art and utility, but the cars are 
the attraction. If they were shown in a 
barn people would go to see them. All the 
great Western States are interested in this 
show. It is to them what the Madison 
Square Automobile show is to Easterners. 
Hundreds of orders for machines have been 
taken for deliveries to the Louisiana Pur- 
chase States and those still farther West. 
In the American section are several fea- 
tures of special interest to automobilists. 
The new White steamer which has been 
put on exhibition is larger than the 1904 
cars also shown and will be the model for 
next season. A number of orders have al- 





ready been given for it. This new ma- 
chine has a longer wheel base than former 
models and an even more commodious ton- 
neau of the King of Belgium type. Motor- 
ists will appreciate this improvement. The 
new steamer is beautiful in finish, weighs 
2,000 pounds and is rated at 15 horse 



power. This 1905 model carries 15 gallons 
of gasoline and water, and can be run 150 
miles on one filling. 

Next to the White is the Grout steam 
car, in several different patterns, one new 
car being for 1905. This machine has con- 
denser tubes which will envelop the front 
of the car like wings. The aluminum fin- 
ished tubes are placed just under well de- 
signed and polished bronze corner base 
pieces and form an agreeable outline for 
the forward part of the automobile. These 
tubes are mechanically correct as well as 
artistic. The new car is being studied 
eagerly by visitors, for many people want a 
cheaper light steam car, with a condenser 
to save too frequent stops to fill the boiler. 
Grout Brothers hold the record of being 
the first exhibit ready for opening day at 
the World's Fair. They were also the first 
to ta"ke out permits for demonstrating ma- 
chines to be run from the automobile en- 
trance of the Transportation building out 
tnrough the Plateau of States. Nearly one- 
half of the manufacturers at present use 
demonstrating cars. 

The Winton car in the booth across 
the aisles from the steamers lias a 
1905 model which shows a horizontal 
engine with all the cylinders on one 
side of the shaft. Other sections 
such as the Olds, the Electric Vehi- 
cle Company, the Haynes-Apperson 
and all the first class American works 
have adequate displays. 

The foreign section of automobiles 
in the Transportation building covers 
20,000 square feet, and has 54 exhib- 
its. It shows many interesting fea- 
tures, for the foreigners exhibit 
chassis as well as the complete 
carriage. The French work is as well fin- 
ished inside as out, and they are not 
ashamed to show what they can do. The 
Renault exhibit, which consists of 5 ma- 
chines and 2 chassis, shows the firm's im- 
proved engines and superior workmanship. 
The Georges Richards Brazier display has 




AN AUTOMOBILE SECTION AT THE FAIR. 



2 cars and one chassis on the stand.. The 
chassis show the type of engine put into 
the car which won the Gordon Bennett 
cup June 17th last. The 'Clement-Bayard 
firm exhibit 4 cars of their specialty, the 
voiturette. The coachmakers of Paris, 
Kellner & Sons, Rothschilds and Botiaux, 
each have excellent showings of upholstered 
carriage bodies for automobiles. Kellner 
surpasses in designs of bodies and in finish- 
ing. His C spring victoria is the most 
artistically shaped car at the show. One 
Frenchwoman had the pleasure of trying 
the car and said that it was a "Paradise 
des dames." In this booth is an old dili- 
gence similar to the heavy wagons used in 
France before the introduction of railway 
coaches. It is painted yellow with a claret 
molding and is greatly admired. 

The foreign section shows one electric 
carriage and one steam machine. Jeantaud 
was one of the first French manufacturers 
to develop the electric automobile, and he 
has made great advance, as is shown by his 



coupe and cab. The steam machine is a 
40 horse power Turgan which has a 4 ton 
carrying capacity, and is used as a heavy 
deliverv wagon through the country dis- 
tricts of France. 

The Touring Club de France has an ex- 
hibit showing the principal touring routes 
of the French Republic. 

The Mors section shows some of the 
finest cars yet turned out. One in particu- 
lar, a tonneau coupe is much admired. 
Another car is a side-door double phaeton, 
of 25 horse power, which has a canopy top 
and a glass front and back. 

The De Dctrich section contains a Berlin 
Limousine car of 40 horse power which is 
exactly similar to the touring car built for 
King Edward of England. The interior is 
of curly maple, beautifully inlaid. It is in 
this car that the unique writing table is 
found. The seats are revolving chairs. 
Another interesting feature in this exhibit 
is a racing boat 27 feet long which has won 
8 pennants in France. 




A VARIETY OF MODELS. 
i 47 



6 




'''~~&>;M: r ,A '' 



Taken as a whole, the automobile ex- 
hibits at the World's Fair are one of the 
most popular features of the immense trans- 
portation building. Both foreign and 
American sections show changes from early 
models to more V shaped motor cars. The 
front of the automobile is becoming smaller 
and smaller while the back is expanding. 
The present models show great progress 
from the early type, which was merely an 
ordinary carriage with the dashboard and 



whip removed. So complete are the new 
cars shown at the Louisiana Purchase Ex- 
position that the rich who go away for 
summer vacations and recreation jaunts no 
longer need to depend on railway trains but 
may go in automobiles as sumptuous as 
palace cars. The exhibit in the Transpor- 
tation building is so arranged as to furnish 
entertainment for those who go merely to 
see, and practical education for those who 
want to learn about motor cars. 



A delegation of Osage Indians from Ok- 
lahoma recently c"lled on the President, 
asking that the money now in the United 
States treasury standing to their credit be 
divided among them. When asked what 
they needed the cash for, one of the chiefs 
replied that they were much in need of 
automobiles. — Exchange. 



148 



THE HILL CLIMBERS. 



The greatest hill-climbing contest that 
has ever been held was that up Mount 
Washington, which took place last July. 
Some attempts at mountain climbing have 
been made abroad by following the road- 
bed of cogwheel railways, but no real moun- 
tain climbing contest over a road 8 miles 
in length with a continuous grade of 5 to 20 
per cent, has never before been held. Eigh- 
teen machines participated in the climb. The 
most sensational as well as the fastest per- 
formance was that of Harry Harkness on 
his 60-horse-power Mercedes, which con- 
quered the mountain in 24 minutes, 37 3-5 
seconds. F. E. Stanley, one of the pioneer 
inventors of the steam automobile in Amer- 
ica, made the next best time in a 6-horse- 
power steamer. This was 28 minutes, 19 
2-5 seconds. The best performances in the 
class for vehicles weighing between 1,000 
and 2,000 pounds were those of a 24-horse- 
power Peerless (26 minutes, 6 4-5 seconds, 
2 minutes being allowed on account of a 
delay caused by another machine being in 
the way) ; a 10-horse-power White steamer 
(42 minutes, 194-5 seconds); and a 20- 
horse-power, 3-cylinder Phelps (47 min- 
utes, 292-5 seconds). A 12-horse-power 



Columbia machine did the climb in 51 min- 
utes, 502-5 seconds. For vehicles under 
1,000 pounds a 6-horse-power Oldsmobile 
made the good time of 1 hour, 20 minutes, 
46 seconds. Two specially built light steam 
cars were second and third in this class in 
2 hours, 16 minutes, 55 seconds and 2 
hours, 25 minutes, 51 2-5 seconds, respec- 
tively. In the free-for-all class, J. L. 
Breeze, in a 40-horse-power Mercedes, 
climbed the mountain in 31 minutes, 22 4-5 
seconds. What made the test of particular 
value was that the machines were all stock 
cars. Besides the mountain climbing con- 
test, several 100-mile tours through the 
mountains were made during the remain- 
ing days of the week. 

A new form of endurance test that has 
developed of late is the non-stop run. By 
this is meant a trip during which the en- 
gine of the automobile is never stopoed. 
The longest run on record of this kind is 
one of 2,017 miles, made recently in Eng- 
land on a Talbot car. The run consumed 
5 days and 4 hours, during all of which 
time the engine ran continuously. Several 
attempts of his sort have been made in this 
country, but thus far they have not been 
successful. — Scientific American. 



AN AUTUMN STROLL. 

SAMUEL G. PALMER. 

Have you known the delights of a stroll At last on the summit we've taken our 

through the haze stand. 

On a fair Autumnal day? Like a beautiful dream 

How the rainbow-clad trees of our village Far away in succession loom hill ranges 

highways grand 

Stand resplendent and gay? 'Neath the sun's fading gleam. 

Come out on the hills where the sunbeams As we turn to descend, from the valley 

and wind below 

Have free play o'er the fields ; There's a flash in the shade, 

Where the orchard or vineyard prolific, Where a lake in the calm of the twilight 

we find, doth glow 

Its full fruitage now yields. Like the sabre's keen blade. 

As we climb the steep grade that leads up Even now the delights of our stroll do 

to the crown not cloy ! 

Of a tall, wooded hill, Hear the birds' vesper hymn ! 

The broad winged hawk from his tree And when once we are home, then the cup 

swoops down of our joy 

With a scream wild and shrill. Is quite filled to the brim. 



149 




ISO 



A CONVERTED GAME BUTCHER. 



ED. ROBINSON. 



I am a sheep herder, away out in the 
Badlands, and I hardly ever see anybody 
to talk to. I came in to my camp a few 
days ago, hungry and tired, and found 
my copy of Recreation. I began to read 
it and forgot to get supper, something a 
sheep herder seldom does forget. 

I have been among the big game about 
10 years and have been a genuine game 
hog, too. I was out hunting last fall and 
saw a sight that has taken all the bristles 
off me. I never expect to murder "another 
of these noble animals. I was camped on 
the river close to some small tributaries 
that came down from the mountains. As 
I was out for bear more than anything 
else I decided to go to the head of one 
of the tributaries, lie out all night and try to 
get a shot at a bear the next morning. I 
left camp about 10 o'clock a. m., and got 
to the head of the canyon just before sun- 
down. The elk had begun to come -ut in 
little parks to feed. I saw a good many 
cows and calves, but did not molest them. 
Then I went down into a thick patch of 
timber, built a fire, and lay down for the 
night. About an hour after sunset the elk 
began to tune their mouth organs. I 
was sitting by the fire about half asleep, 
when suddenly a sound like a steamboat 
whistle came roaring down the moun- 
tains. 

It would have frightened a man almost to 
death if he had never heard the sound 
before. It was answered by another from 
the opposite side of the canyon, and in a 
few minutes the whole canyon was in a 
roar almost deafening. I began to wonder 
what such beasts were ever created for. 
The bugling increased until I longed for 
daybreak so I could see what was going 
on. At dawn I arose, ate my breakfast, 
and as soon as it was light enough to trav- 
el I went up toward where the sound of 
the elk came from. I had not gone more 
than 75 yards when I began to see elk in 
every direction, but the timber was thick 
and I could not get a full view of the 
surroundings. I concluded to go back, 
up a little gulch, and get on top of a big 
rim rock. After about 20 minutes' hard 
climbing I came out on the rim rock, and 
such a sight I never saw before ! The 
whole country below me was alive with 
elk! A little park, just below me, of about 
5 acres, seemed to be their playground. I 
got down close to the edge of the cliff, 
where I could have thrown a stone among 
them. 

By that time the sun had begun to 
shine on the snowy peaks around, which 



added to the beauty of the scene, but the 
living creatures below were the center 
of attraction to me. Mountain scenery 
I have viewed in all its grandeur, but 
without those creatures it is dead. Then 
I began to realize what they were created 
for. Why should we slay those beautiful 
animals ? There I sat, their arch enemy, 
and they were wholly unaware of it. I 
could study them in their home, which 
nature has made for them. One of the 
males 'had 8 points on his horns and he 
was a monster. He seemed to be the boss. 
He tried to run every other bull out of 
the park as fast as they came in. He ran 
until his tongue hung out of his mouth. 
Then he went over to the West side of the 
park, where there was a large mud hole 
and wallowed in it until he was cooled off. 
Then he began his chase again. Soon an- 
other elk came out of the timber, as large 
as" he was and equally as lordly. They in- 
vestigated each other and then came to- 
gether with a crash that sounded like a 
dead tree falling. I never saw 2 animals 
fight so wickedly. It lasted 10 minutes. 
Then the first old boss gave way and turned 
to run. The other caught him in the ribs, 
knocked him down and gored him fear- 
fully. At last he got on his feet, started 
down hill, never stopped to look back, and 
disappeared in the timber. How gladly 
I would have traded my rifle for a camera ! 
Since then I have bought a camera and 
have learned to make good pictures. I 
shall always take my camera on hunting 
trips hereafter, instead of a gun. 

I watched the antics of that band of elk 
in joy and amazement. Why should any 
man ever kill one of these beautiful crea- 
tures? I know that in my excitement I 
would without stopping to think ; but that 
time I had to think. If all sportsmen, 
when they raise their deadly weapons to 
blow out the life of one of the few remain- 
ing wild animals will stop to consider that 
these creatures give life to the desolate 
wilderness and glory to the earth, they 
will trade their firearms for cameras, take 
pictures instead of heads, and let the ani- 
mals remain alive. I beg my brother 
game hogs to use a camera instead of a 
gun and they will be 10 times happier after 
a day's hunt. 

To-day I was standing by 3 buffalo 
heads. The hide was on the skulls yet, and 
I wondered how long the animals had been 
dead. How grand it would be to see one 
of these noble animals alive now! How 
glad I should be to get one picture of one 
of them alive! If our fathers had used 



151 



15^ 



RECREATION. 



cameras instead of firearms, this new gen- 
eration could now see the buffalo roaming 
in our waste lands. There is plenty of 
room yet, but alas ! they have been driven 
from the earth forever, and only their 
bones remain to tell us they inhabited all 
of our Western land. In these remains is 
a lesson for every lover of nature. Let 
us hunt with cameras or the future gen- 



eration will see only the bones of our pres- 
ent game. 

I saw an antelope to-day. He is one of 
the few remaining in this section. He 
stood on a little knoll and whistled at me 
as if he wanted me to come over there, 
but he was extremely suspicious of my 
kind so he turned and galloped off across 
the prairie. 







AMATEUR PHOTO 8Y J. E. STANLEY. 



Highly commended in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



Visitor (in New Jersey) : What a lot of 
automobiles are passing. 

Host : Those are not automobiles. 
Those are mosquitoes. — Life. 



A GAMY PRELUDE. 



REDLEH. 



There were 7 of us, the General, David, 
Bearman, Piker, Farmer, Paddy, and the 
Treasurer. After an 8 day wagon tour we 
arrived at the anticipated paradise on Elk 
river. This is one of the prettiest streams 
in the Colorado mountains, clear and cold, 
with picturesque rapids and waterfalls of 
extraordinary beauty. 

After luncheon, guns were unlimbered, 
rods uncased and with the promise of the 
General and the Treasurer to remain and 
arrange camp, the rest of the party took to 
the woods and waters. Piker and Farmer, 
with David in the lead, steered up the river. 
Trout were evidently hungry for a diet of 
gaudy feathers, so the boys cast and re- 
cast, whipped, spanked and flogged the 
water until creels began to take on weight 
and smiles broke out into laughter as each 
success brought up a writhing, twisting, 
baulking trout, glistening with the drops of 
crystal water and reflecting from its beau- 
tifully colored sides the sunshine of mid- 
afternoon. Such sport exceeded every an- 
ticipation. 

Piker executed a flank movement behind 
a huge boulder, poised his rod in air an 
instant and gracefully placed the fly on the 
edge of a pool opposite, at the same time 
drawing in the rod and making the coach- 
man appear to skim the water in a lazy 
flight. P-s-s-s-h ! A miniature geyser ap- 
peared above the river, augmented by the 
vicious charge of a deluded fish. There 
was an audible 'snip' and the reel at Piker's 
hand commenced to sing, "Ah don't kare 
ef yo nebber kum back." Piker put on the 
brake and smiled complacently. The fel- 
low at the other end of the tackle per- 
formed an athletic turn, displaying much 
strength and agility. Piker chuckled, and 
had visions of himself showing this 
champion to the. other fellows. Those vis- 
ions proved the trout's salvation. The 
line was maconsciously allowed to slacken 
and when Piker grasped the reel to regain 
his advantage, the linen had lost its ten- 
sion. It floated limply down stream, and 
a poor, unkempt, bedraggled coachman 
came to the surface ! 

David wandered up stream and walked 
into the water without stopping to re- 
move his shoes. Just after a 10 inch rain- 
bow had been safely cached in his creel, 
he prepared for another cast and absent 
mindedly stepped forward as if he were 
walking on bare ground. One foot found 
a bald headed, slippery boulder ; the other 
tried to rescue its companion from a fool- 
ish predicament, and with hands saluting 
the sun, and back arched like a cake walk 



soloist, David received the first ducking 
that was accorded any member of our party. 

His ardor received a temporary knock- 
out, so he betook himself toward camp. In 
passing a patch of sarvis berries a large 
covey of grouse flushed, which calmed his 
ruffled spirits. Hastening to headquarters, 
he secured the small rifle and returned for 
a renewal of hostilities on that wing of the 
army. Eight of the flock were secured and 
triumphantly toted to camp. 

As the sun approached the Western 
mountains nearly all the party were back 
in camp which, in their absence had been 
comfortably set in order. Stories of the 
afternoon were wafted about until the 
Treasurer could stand it no longer. He 
grabbed a discarded rod and made a sortie 
on a pool below camp hitherto overlooked 
by the other anglers. The first throw drew 
a blank. Another cast, and a rainbow 
scintillated through the water. He swal- 
lowed the tempting fly like a pill. Then he 
was taken with a violent spasm, gyrating 
through the pool, dodging boulders, twirl- 
ing in loops, and leaping into the air in his 
endeavors to. spit out the distasteful dose. 
After a 10 minute struggle he was towed 
to the bank and the Treasurer viewed the 
15 inches of conquered force with a smile 
that was heard in camp. 

Just then the far away crack of a rifle 
echoed over us. It seemed to come from 
high in the air. A moment later another 
shot sounded across mountain and valley. 
Piker shouted, 

"That's venison," and, accompanied by 
Farmer, started up the mountain, armed 
with knife and hatchet. A short distance 
up they overtook David, who had heard 
and understood the shots, so the 3 con- 
tinued up, up, up, breaking a trail through 
underbrush and over fallen logs, talking 
with difficulty in their laborious exertions. 
Meanwhile those remaining in camp began 
to guess at what was up. It was found 
that Paddy had not been seen since he had 
started up the mountain early in the after- 
noon, so all the hellabaloo was laid at his 
door. Later we learned that he had gone 
over the peak and hunted nearly all day 
without sight or sound of game, when 
across a little clearing he saw among the 
undergrowth 2 brown, pointed things 
flicked together, with a sharp, black tipped 
nose beneath them and what appeared to 
be a bunch of brown sticks above. The 
combination began to move off through the 
aspen. Paddy raised his rifle and aimed 
quickly. The object did a fancy step or 2 
and ambled off briskly into the protecting 



153 



154 



RECREATION. 



tirnber. Running across the open, Paddy 
peered eagerly into the woods. About 190 
yards away stood something that resembled 
a lean, lank, narrow gauge mule apparent- 
ly looking for the cause of its sudden ner- 
vous shock. Paddy again raised his gun, 
the animal jumped at least 12 feet and 
again disappeared. Paddy thought it was 
surely gone that time, but reloading the 
empty chamber of his repeater he walked 
over to where the thing had punctured the 
atmosphere in its wild leap, took half a 
dozen strides farther and found, lying quite 
still, a 4 point buck. Then the tension of 
his nerves found relief in an unrestrained 
yell. The deer was dead; so, marking its 
location, Paddy went to the peak of the 
mountain, just above the camp, and sent the 
2 shot signal to the fellows below. 



The reinforcements lound the successful 
Nimrod, who led them to where his prize 
lay and the bouquets were then passed 
around; Paddy being quite overcome by the 
fragrance that enveloped him. The car- 
cass of the deer was cut up, the boys shoul- 
dered the quarters and all started on the 
return to camp. The arrival of the party 
created a hubbub that was difficult to quell 
even with threats that supper would spoil. 

That meal was a long to be remembered 
banquet. After it pipes were lighted, songs 
were warbled, scaring the coyotes to silence, 
and incidents of the day were discussed 
until we succumbed to the sandman; not, 
however, before we had agreed that no 
game should be taken which would not be 
used for food at once. This agreement was 
maintained throughout our stay. 




CONFIDENCE. 

Highly commended in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 



AMATEUW PHOTO BY C. A. REED. 



TWO GRIZZLIES IN ONE DAY. 



C. H. BARKDULL. 



Our camp was by the side of a wild 
mountain stream that drained a large lake 
nestled among the snow-burdened, glacier- 
ground peaks that form the watershed of 
all the streams in Southeastern Alaska. We 
were too far inland to be molested by the 
coast Siwash Indians, and far enough from 
the interior to be safe from the Stick 
tribes. Game in that protected and favored 
spot had never heard the crack of the 
white man's rifle and had smelled little 
smoke of the Indians' old smooth bores. 
Many of the largest, wariest, and best edu- 
cated grizzlies, brown and black bears, not 
to mention the wolves and wolverines, had 
sought that secluded valley as their home; 
where they might roam undisturbed as in- 
tended by nature and in harmony with their 
keen instincts. The river supplied them for 
several months of the year with the finest 
salmon. The 20 different kinds of berries 
and fruit that abound, and plenty of wild 
cabbage, roots and nutritious grasses kept 
them in the primest condition. The moun- 
tains surrounding the valley were covered 
with bands of mountain goats and sheep. 

Specialists are only content with the best 
the world affords, therefore Jim Green- 
slate and Sam Gowan, 2 scarred veterans 
of the good old buffalo days, had searched 
out this spot as the best field for big game 
in all the world. Fate favored me so that 
I was to share its favors with them. 

Breakfast over, guns came off the 
racks, each fellow put up his lunch, care- 
fully inspected his cartridges, 6-shooter, 
hunting knife and belt, buckled on his pack 
straps and we were off. Sam went up the 
North fork of the river in the direction of 
the glacier, Jim and I up the main river, 
toward the lake. The newly fallen snow 
cracked and crunched as we traveled and 
we left a trail behind us that could be seen 
a mile. 

After a while Jim stopped and pointed 
to the side of the mountain. A fresh trail 
about 3 feet wide wound across the foot 
of a slide and down on the river bar ahead. 
We hastened our steps and were soon on 
the spot. The tracks showed 2 grizzlies, 
one large and the other larger. 

"If we get them 2 fellers to-day we'll 
make old Sam ashamed of himself," said 
Jim. 

At that we struck the trail. Not another 
word was spoken. We scanned every bar, 
every open nook, every log and tree behind 
which the bears had passed. We could see 
the trail a long distance ahead. We fairly 
ran, in that low, bending attitude a hunter 



always strikes when he is close to game 
and expects a shot at any second. We 
came to a big pile of driftwood and logs 
and could see where the bears had climbed 
over. As we neared the logs Jim struck 
a match to get the direction of the wind. 
It was in our favor. Carefully sneaking 
up we peeked over, both hands gripping our 
old rifles. We both looked on a mass of 
bear tracks, bloody and mud-colored snow. 
The bears had had their breakfast there 
and the remains of half a dozen salmon 
were scattered about. 

After looking close, we saw the trail 
going on up the river. 

"They are not half an hour ahead of us. 
We will get them in those deadfalls up 
there. They are headed right for them." 

Again we struck the trail on a trot. The 
first great deadfall was in sight. 

"She's down!" shouted Jim. "We've got 
one of them, sure ! What ! Well, did you 
ever?" 

The deadfall was torn to pieces. Great 
logs scattered in every direction. Over 
2,000 pounds had fallen on that old griz- 
zly's shoulders but it didn't crush him. He 
had backed out, and in doing so had torn 
the trap to pieces. The bait was gone. 
With the exception of the loss of a lot of 
long, silky, silver-tipped hair the old fel- 
low seemed none the worse for his ex- 
perience and had continued his journey up 
the river with his smaller partner, right in 
the direction of the next bait, where we 
had set a great 42-pound No. 6 Newhouse 
steel trap supposed to catch and hold any 
game animal on the American continent. 

We again hit the trail and as we neared 
the trap a roar, mingled with crashing and 
cracking of bushes and trees, greeted us. 
The big brute had cleared off nearly a 
quarter of an acre of brush and small trees 
and had dragged the big log, weighing fully 
400 pounds, over everything he had come 
to until it fouled under and against 2 trees. 
He saw us and charged full tilt, coming^ as 
far as the trap and chain would let him, 
then rising on his haunches and striking 
the trap against the log with force sufficient 
to pulverize it. 

Two 6-shooters speak at once ; he lunges 
forward and falls in a great heap with a 
shattered brain. 

"That's No. 1! Now for the big one. 
That old fellow has smelt iron before and 
he's going to give an account of himself." 

"He's not far from here, right now." 

We carefully inspected our shooting irons 
and again hit the trail up the river. It 



155 



i56 



RECREATION. 



went around a steep bank on the right, then 
up through a big open park and into a 
bunch of timber. 

"There's where he's lying, Cal. You go 
up that right hand ridge and head him off. 
I'll follow him. Keep in sight so we can 
both do some shootin'." 

I climbed the first ridge and was sneak- 
ing along, keeping Jim in sight. From my 
elevated position on the ridge I could see 
the bear's trail lead up to the top of a little 
mound and stop behind an overhanging 
ledge of rocks. Jim was within 40 feet of 
it when I whistled. 

Jim stopped and the great silvery coated 
old monster raised from his bed, preparing 
himself for the attack. I dared not shoot 
as Jim and the bear were in almost a direct 
line from me. The old grizzly's mane rose 
and turned the wrong way. His small eyes 
flashed and sparkled like great black dia- 
monds. His lower jaw dropped, his long 
upper lip lowered and projected forward, 
forming almost a proboscis. Foam and 
strings of saliva ran from his long, pearly, 
pointed fangs. His round ears lowered and 
lay down out of sight in his furry head 
gear. It took about 6 pulsations of his 



ponderous heart to make this transformation 
and he was ready. 

Jim coolly raised his old 45-70. I could 
see the polished ivory bead, the glow of sil- 
ver along the barrel in the sun's rays ; I 
could hear the lock click. Then bang ! A 
roar from the grizzly mingled with the re- 
port of the rifle and shook the snow from 
the branches overhead. The grizzly charged, 
and 2 shots, at almost the same second, took 
effect. I could not keep out of it longer ! 
Bang again, 2 more, almost together. The 
show flew in all directions as the grizzly 
raised to make his last and fatal lunge. 
Jim fired again. A great gush of crimson 
shot forth as the bear fell within 10 feet 
of where Jim stood. 

The great grizzly bled all the more freely 
from his over exertions, and as I appeared 
on the scene several seconds later, all was 
quiet. Jim stood over the carcass seeking 
where the shots took effect. A blue cloud 
of sulphurous smoke ascended heavenward, 
and the distant echo of our heavy guns was 
the death dirge of this veteran that had 
crossed another great divide to a hap- 
pier valley ho'me where enemies are un- 
known. 



JUST OVER THE HILL. 



C. 0. WOODMANSEE. 



There's a beautiful valley over the hill, 

In the "Land that's just out of sight," 
Where the daisies nod to the rising sun, 

And the dewdrops sparkle bright. 
There's a babbling brook in this pleasant 
vale 

That sings its gladsome song 
On its pebbly bed, 'twixt banks of green 

As it merrily dances along. 

There's a glassy pool in this singing brook 

Where deep the shadows lie ; 
And through the willows that arch o'erhead 

Peep glimpses of azure sky. 

There's a shaded nook in this valley fair 
Where the spritely fairies play; 

Where the moss lies thick beneath the foot 
And the sunbeams never stray. 



There are sights and sounds delightful and 
rare 
The eye and ear to please; 
While the fragrant perfume of clover and 
flower 
Are borne on the gentle breeze. 

The breezes are soft that blow down the 
vale 
As the balmy breath of spring ; 
And the sun shines mellow on golden 
grain, 
And song birds sweetly sing. 

Oh, this magical vale of which I have sung, 

Is but a dream, I know, 
But I love to visit its peaceful scenes 

As in fancy there I go. 



There is some difference between a horse 
and an automobile. A horse has life and 
sometimes one wishes he hadn't quite 
so much. An automobile is lifeless until 
you put life into it. A horse gets frightened 
by an automobile.. You couldn't scare an 
automobile with a horse to save the sole of 
your shoe. — Madrid, ia., News. 




THE BALTIMORE ORIOLE'S SUMMER HOME. 



157 



A TRIPLE CANOE TRIP. 



HAMOK. 



There were 4 of us, college men, who 
had elected thus to spend a part of our long 
vacation. We had severally made vacation 
trips in all directions. Some of us had 
camped, hunted and fished in Canada and 
along the St. Lawrence, in the forests of 
upper Michigan and the far Northwest, 
among the Rocky mountains and even in 
foreign lands. Therefore when one pro- 
posed to spend 2 or 3 weeks in a boating 
trip down the Tippecanoe he was derided 
for suggesting anything so hopelessly tame. 
Circumstances, however, made it more con- 
venient for all to remain within the State 
that summer, so the quartet agreed to put 
up with tameness and make the run merely 
for the sake of being out of doors. 

The result was a surprise. The upper 
Tippecanoe, fed by a chain of beautiful 
lakes and flowing through a country for 
the most part level and sandy, whose soil 
absorbs much of the rainfall, is as clear as 
any spring. It is not subject to sudden rise 
and fall, as are streams in a hilly region, 
but flows on equably, rising a few inches 
or feet when its lake feeders are full, and 
falling gradually as these are drained off. 
Its lower course, from Monticello down, is 
more readily affected by rains, because the 
water drains rapidly from the hills directly 
into the river. A crookeder stream prob- 
ably never existed, not even the classic 
Meander, than the Tippecanoe in parts of 
its course. Often a half or quarter mile 
portage would have taken us to a point 3 
miles or more away by river. 

Our canoes for the trip were of local 
make, flat bottomed in view of the shallow 
riffles we were to meet, 12 feet long, 20 
inches wide on the bottom and 26 at the 
top, tapering in a gentle curve to a sharp 
point at each end. Shod with zinc at the 
ends, and painted neatly, they were ready 
for collisions with rocks or for inspection 
by any critic we were likely to meet. Each 
of us carried a long double paddle, with a 
single paddle in reserve ; but they were 
used chiefly for steering, as we were con- 
tent most of the time to float with the cur- 
rent. Paddling seemed too much like work 
for vacation. 

Striking camp the first morning was a 
slow process, but practice soon made us 
perfect in this. Blankets and extra cloth- 
ing were rolled up and protected by an 
oilcloth cover. For carrying provisions 
and small articles which would be injured 
by wetting we found large lard cans, hold- 
ing 6 gallons or more, very convenient. 
Their lids fit tight and are complete pro- 
tection against rain, while if properly lashed 



in they will not spill their contents even 
in case of an upset. We carried no tent 
except a rectangular fly 10 x 16 feet, which 
when stretched under small trees shed the 
rain — and that was all we asked. 

After camping a day or 2 on the shore 
-of Tippecanoe lake, 8 miles Northeast of 
Warsaw, Indiana, we started down the 
river, which flows from the Western end 
of the lake. For the first 2 days we found 
the stream small and not infrequently 
blocked by jams of driftwood and by fallen 
trees, over or under or through which the 
boats had to be forced with no little 
effort and discomfort. An occasional low 
footbridge or a barbed wire at or near the 
surface of the water added to the gayety 
of the trip. There was no wild scenery, 
though the untouched forest with dense 
undergrowth and hanging vines, the trees 
often arching the infant stream completely, 
made it hard to believe we were so near 
civilization. A little lower, the banks be- 
come ideal from a camper's point of view. 
Besides the willow and the sycamore, which 
line the banks of every stream in this re- 
gion, there were long stretches of oak, ash, 
elm and beech groves, shading a smooth 
turf of bluegrass. For miles at a time we 
might have landed at random and been sure 
of finding an excellent camp ground. 

For provisions, we carried some canned 
meats and fruits, and for the rest foraged 
on the country. The farm people treated 
us well in spite of our increasingly disrep- 
utable appearance, selling us milk and but- 
ter, bread and fruit, at most reasonable 
prices. Hayes carried a small repeating 
rifle, which brought down not a few unfor- 
tunate squirrels and ducks, and our fly 
rods yielded a bass now and then. Alto- 
gether, we lived on the fat of the land, and 
when Son's joints began to pain him he de- 
clared he could not be sure whether it was 
rheumatism or gout. 

Mosquitoes were troublesome at night, 
and to some of us their singing and sting- 
ing became intolerable. At last the sug- 
gestion was made that we sleep in the boats. 
No sooner said than done. A bed was 
laid in the bottom with brush, or with 
straw when we could get it, and on this the 
canoeist lay, wrapped in his blanket and 
covered with a strip of canvas to keep off 
the heavy dew. The experiment was a 
complete success. The noxious insects did 
not come near us when we were anchored 
in midstream, and the only drawback to 
the complete enjoyment of the situation 
was the crankiness of the canoes, which 
compelled us to wake up whenever we de- 
158 



A TRIPLE CANOE TRIP. 



159 



sired to turn in bed, for fear of capsizing. 
In the morning we rolled out of bed into 
the water for a bath, and altogether the ar- 
rangement was ideal. 

The upper river, except for the jams and 
wire fences already mentioned, is compara- 
tively clear sailing; but below Winamac we 
found the remains of many rude stone 
dams. They were made years ago, and are 
always on a riffle, where the water is swift 
but shallow. As a consequence, the stones 
are in plain sight at low water, and the 
question is one of getting through at all 
without walking; but when the stream is 
up they are covered, and their presence is 
revealed only by the extraordinary rough- 
ness of the water. There is always at least 
one narrow gap in the dam. As the canoe- 
ist approaches rapidly from above he sees 
somewhere in the line of tumbling foam a 
black triangle of swift, smooth water, its 
apex down stream. If he can strike this 
triangle bow on he will glide through 
smoothly; if not, he is morally sure to 
bump, may capsize, and probably will stick 
between 2 rocks and swamp his boat. 

Besides these fish dams we met several 
of more familiar construction ; one each at 
Oswego, Bloomingsburg, Pulaski and Nor- 
way, and 2 at Monticello. The Bloomings- 
burg dam is of logs, and it is an easy mat- 
ter to lift the boats down. At Pulaski we 
portaged. At Norway we made our way 
around through the old mill race, since 
closed. Both the Monticello dams have — 
or had — fish ways or ladders, down which 
we slid the boats with little difficulty. 

Fishing in the Tippecanoe, like some 
other things in life, is not what it once was. 
Spearing, seining and dynamiting have done 
their part toward exterminating the bass 
that used to 'swarm in its waters ; but if 
we may believe the fishermen we passed, 
the one thing which has done more harm 
than all these is the introduction of the 
carp. These water hogs are said to de- 



vour the spawn of other fish, especially of 
bass. 

The Tippecanoe flows into the Wabash 
river a few miles above LaFayette, not far 
from the historic battle ground where Te- 
cumseh met his fate. At LaFayette one 
can ship his canoe in almost any direction 
within a few hours after his arrival, and 
take train himself for home. He can, if he 
so desire, continue his journey down the 
Wabash, but after the first few miles the 
yellow water, muddy banks and monoto- 
nous scenery grow tiresome, especially as 
there is little good fishing. For canoeing 
one wants a narrow, rapid stream, not too 
much frequented, and if possible abound- 
ing in fish. Its banks should be clean and 
its bed rock or sand. The farther from 
civilization the better, but tolerable canoe- 
ing can be found even in Indiana. 

For 3 weeks we loitered along the beau- 
tiful river, starting late and stopping early, 
with long noonings and sometimes whole 
days in camp. Each morning the bath, 
each evening the monster camp fire. The 
element of danger and daring adventure 
was wanting, of course, but as a complete 
change from the monotony of school or 
business life such a trip with all its tame- 
ness has charms. It is better than camping 
in a fixed place, for there is constant change 
of scene and incident and greater opportu- 
nity for roughing it. The small expense 
involved may prove another item in its 
favor for those whose purses are not over 
deep. 

Our party returned to cuffs and collars, 
beds and tables, with real regret. Poly's 
valedictory ran something like this : 

"I tell you, fellows, my idea of an even- 
ing in heaven is a grassy island, a big fire, 
a blanket and a pipe; the moon just rising 
round and full, the air full of the scent of 
wood and the sound of rushing waters, 
supper done, the dishes washed, and every- 
body happy. If I've done anyone a wrong, 
I forgive him now." 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ROBT. STEVENSON, 



PINE GROSBEAKS. 
Winner of 36th Prize in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY R. H. BEEB 



TRYING THEIR MUSCLE. 
Highly commended in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 




TURTLES. 

Highly commended in Recreation's 8th Annual Photo Competition. 

1 60 



AMATEUR PH. TO BY J. E. STANLEY 



THE FIRST FLY ON A NEW STREAM. 



E. HICKSON. 



The firm I worked for had a water mill 
on the Caraguet river, which empties into 
the Bay Chaleur, in Northern New Bruns- 
wick. Our manager at Caraguet had told 
us at different times that French people 
who lived on or near another stream called 
the Pokemouche, had brought in large trout, 
some weighing over 5 pounds. For a long 
time I had been promising myself the pleas- 
ure of casting a fly in the Pokemouche. I 
knew it was a larger stream than the Cara- 
guet and we got fine trout on that. I was 
certain the Pokemouche had never been 
fished with a fly, so one day in September 
a friend and I found ourselves at the Cara- 
guet mill on the way to the Pokemouche, 
and a great time we had getting there. 

We had brought with us a small tent, 
blankets, and a bark canoe, which with pro- 
visions for a week we intended taking 
through the woods to the stream we were 
in search of. 

The French people said there was a good 
road about 4 miles and after that we must 
follow an old lumber road which might and 
might not bring us to the Pokemouche. 

The night we arrived at Caraguet mill 
we loaded our tent, canoe and other things 
on a cart, and early next morning started 
on the trail. We had 2 good men with 
us, Richard Brauch and James Power. 

The first 4 miles proved easy and the 
horses made good headway. Then we struck 
into the forest by a partly cut out trail. 
The horses struggled along about 2 miles, 
after which we concluded to send them 
back, as we had to cut many trees to make 
room for the wagon and the men said it 
would be. easier to carry the canoe and lug- 
gage the remaining 3 miles. 

It was by this time about 11 o'clock, so 
w T e boiled the kettle and after a snack the 
men shouldered the canoe, my friend and 
I cut a pole, piled as much as we could 
carry into the tent and swung it on our 
shoulders. 

We were young and strong but we had a 
heavy load and had to rest every 15 or 20 
minutes. Grouse were plentiful and I had 
with me a 22 rifle with which I knocked 
down 12 of them as we struggled along. 

At 4 o'clock in the afternoon we found 
ourselves in a cedar swamp and it took the 
best part of an hour to disentangle the party 
and reach high ground. Perspiring and 
tired we reached a hardwood ridge and 
after a short rest began what we rightly 
concluded was the downward trend of 
ground to the river. We were soon fol- 
lowing a brook which must lead us to the 
Pokemouche and at dusk we struggled out 



on an old log brow and cheered as we saw 
a beautiful stream below us. 

Alders grew down to the narrow beach 
of the stream at this point and I saw a 
deep pool below us where a big elm tree 
had fallen nearly to the water's edge and 
lodged. As the men hurried to put up 
the tent and make a fire I longed for one 
cast. I had a stiff rod which screwed to- 
gether in the middle. I quickly set this up, 
attached my reel, and not waiting to put on 
a casting line, merely snipped on a red 
bodied fly, with white wings, which is my 
favorite evening fly, by one strand of gut. 

Standing on the trunk of the elm I man- 
aged to drop the fly directly under it. I do 
not think the fly was in the water one sec- 
ond, until there was a mighty splash which 
even the men at the tent heard, and which 
brought my friend running toward me. 

The reel made music to cheer the heart of 
a weary angler, and away up stream went 
the big fish. I had not bargained for this. 
The alders prevented me from following, 
as I could not raise my rod above them, 
and it was impossible to get down to the 
narrow beach. In fact, in many places there 
was no beach, as the alders grew right out 
into the stream. 

Before I knew what had happened the 
fish had fully 60 feet of line out. Then he 
turned and came toward me. Fortunately 
he was well hooked, and kept toward the 
opposite bank of the stream, but just as he 
reached the tree he evidently made for 
'his old hole under the trunk of the elm 
and dashed past me. I managed, I know 
not how, with my friend's help, to get the 
rod passed under the elm by which time 
the big trout was away down stream, and 
risking the chance of a ducking I climbed 
further out on the tree, straightened up my 
rod, and gave him the butt. I was all right 
now if I could only keep him away from the 
alders on both sides of the stream, for I 
could see where the pool shoaled away over 
a gravelly bed about 100 feet below ; so after 
a struggle I felt rather than saw, as it was 
almost dark, that I had my fish snubbed. 
Up he came, fighting every inch of the way, 
and doing his best to reach the shade of the 
alders. I feared he might take a notion to 
go up stream, under the tree again, so I 
eased him up in the deep water below, and 
played him there until I had him tired 
out. 

The next thing was to get the fish ashore. 
The bank of the stream was fully 25 feet 
high, covered thickly with alders and there 
was no path visible. However, Dick took 
his axe and cut a way for himself down 



[61 



1 62 



RECREATION. 



to where he could steady himself standing 
on a big root and I brought the fish to him. 
The line was tangled in the alders and I 
left the rod on the elm while Dick carried 
the big beauty up the bank and over to the 
fire. The trout would have weighed a good 
5 pounds, and I was sure there more like 
him in that pool. 

It was dark by this time and Jim had 
several grouse skinned and broiled before 
the big fire, with potatoes and clean water 
for tea boiling about it. In a minute or 2 
Dick had th'e big trout cleaned and spread 
out to the blaze. We were all dead tired, 
but did not we have a supper that night ! 

Talk about trout fishing ! The next morn- 



ing we cut a pathway down to the stream, 
launched our canoe and after catching 
enough fish for breakfast, allowed the rest, 
and there were thousands, to remain in their 
watery home. After breakfast we em- 
barked and went up river on an exploring 
expedition about 10 miles. As we came 
back in the evening we ran through pools 
that were fairly alive with trout. We re- 
mained in this camp 2 days, then struck our 
tent and putting . everything in the canoe 
ran down stream about 4 miles, where we 
found an ideal camp ground, a high plateau 
between the mouths of 2 brooks, where we 
spent a week. Trout ! The river was alive 
with them everywhere. 



HOW JOSEPH KILLED THE CHICKENS. 



W. D. GAY. 



Emil Joseph John McCrickens 
Saw a flock of prairie chickens 

Sailing o'er his father's barn at early morn; 
And he cocked his ear to listen, 
And his eyes began to glisten, 

As he saw them light down in a field of 
corn. 

"Now," said Emil, "something's doing; 
Now we'll have some juicy chewing," 
And he took his muzzle loader from the 
hooks upon the wall. 
"Now you bet I'll load her good; 
Guess I'll use some Robin Hood, 
And a double dose of leaden slugs and 
ball." 

Now, Emil, don't you do it ; 
If you do, I'm sure you'll rue it ; 
And don't you ask your father to go with 
you on your bail. 
Do have sense enough to quit, 
We won't pity you a bit, 
If those prairie chicken wardens come and 
take you off to jail. 

But Joseph he was raw — 
Said he didn't care a straw 
For all the warden deputies in county, town 
or state. 
Said the game belonged to them 
Just as much as Uncle Sam : 
Said he'd like to see a warden coming 
through the garden gate. 



"Now, to kill these prairie chickens, 
I must hit them like the dickens; 
I must get up close enough to hear them 
squall. 
But how to do it beats me — 
I'm afraid that they will see me, 
So I guess I'd better lay me down and 
crawl." 

So he sneaked up on his face 
Till he came to a good place, 
Then he poked hi" gun out through the 
hedge and let her go. 
When they found him, he was crazy — 
Said, "Oh, take me home to Daisy, 
But leave the gun and bristles scattered 
o'er the snow." 

In his bed he lay and thought, 
And he wished that he had bo't 

A repeater that he saw down at the store. 
But his troubles were not ended, 
And he thought himself suspended, 

For those prairie chicken wardens they 
were thirsty for his gore. 

Now just take John's advice, 
Don't you ever try it twice; 
This shooting out of season surely isn't 
worth a peg; 
And as soon as he gets well, 
He won't go about and tell 
How those prairie chicken wardens pulled 
his leg. 






A WESTERN JUNO. 



GEO. W. LUTHER. 



As I read Mr. Lancaster's story of "Juno, 
the Retriever," I recalled an experience 
which I had with a dog a few years ago. 
He was a mongrel with considerable Scotch 
terrier blood, belonging to Captain Richard 
Olmsted, of DeTour, Michigan. 

The ducks were plentiful that fall, and 
as I was anxious to get some good specimens 
for my collection, the Captain lent me his 
dog. We started early one morning so that 
we might reach a certain lake before day- 
break; not that I wished to take an unfair 
advantage of the ducks, but that I might 
hear their flight as they came sweeping 
down from their Northern nesting place. 

The dog, Guess, as he was called, was 
as much at home with me as if he had 
been my own. His head was full of game 
and his greatest ambition was to retrieve, 
no matter who might hold the gun. 

We reached the desired spot a little be- 
fore light. Never have I passed so delight- 
ful an hour as on that morning. We sat 
down together and the music of wings be- 
gan. Only those who have heard the wings 
of ducks cut the air as they sweep down 
from the heights at which they make their 
migratory trips, can know what it is like. 
A stranger to such an experience would 
never dream that the cutting of the air by 
a score of wings could produce such sounds. 
The whistle of the American goldeneyes, 
the s-w-i-s-h of the mergansers, and the 
peculiar, indescribable hum of the butter- 
balls produce a medley which I would go 
miles to hear. 

How we enjoyed it! Yes, we; the dog, 
perhaps, more than I, though he could not 
quite understand why I gave him no chance 
to bring some of them in. He sat close to 
my side and every few minutes would place 
his foot on my knee and look up into my 
face as if pleading to be off. 

It seemed as if thousands of the birds 
must have struck the water within half a 
mile of us as we' waited for the dawn. Just 
as the shadows were lifting we moved to 
a point which extended a little distance into 
the lake. The grass grew down to the 
water's edge. It was as thick as a mat and 
about 3 feet high. With my knife I cut a 
spot large enough for myself and Guess. 
We were so close to the water that I could 
easily reach it with my hand, yet nothing 
could have seen us by looking in from the 
water. We had hardly settled down when 
we heard the riffling sound caused by the 
bills of a large flock of American mergans- 
ers as they skimmed past the point. The 
dog looked at me wistfully, but I shook 



my head. Then the ducks began to close in 
around us. We were the center of their 
Mecca. The dog was an interesting study. 
He would look up at me and then at the 
birds which were often within a few feet 
of us. Nothing, however, could have in- 
fluenced him to move more than his eyes. 
I never expect to behold such a sight again. 
There were literally acres of water alive 
with butterballs, mergansers, and bluebills ; 
and a little farther away whistlers, mal- 
lards, and a few canvasbacks. 

Though the canvasbacks would have en- 
grossed the attention of sportsmen gener- 
ally, they were of no special interest to me. 

1 was not after meat. The butcher's shop 
is the best place to get that. There were 

2 crested heads a little beyond range which 
took my eye and represented something 
infinitely better to me than mere eating. 
His stomach ought not to be the most 
important part of a man. 

At last those snowy, fanlike crests were 
within range. Oh, but they were beauties ! 
They came in toward us, first one and then 
the other craning his neck much like a 
rooster and sending forth a little note 
which is intended to produce the same sen- 
sation in duckdom as the crowing of a 
rooster does in the farmyard. 

I did not realize until that moment to 
what a fearful test I was putting the dog. 
As I placed my hand on my gun I locked 
at him. His eyes glistened with anticipa- 
tion. He was the picture of eagerness, and 
yet of faithfulness. Then I located the 2 
crests again. They surely were within 
range. As I arose Guess crouched closer 
to the ground, his hind legs moving some- 
what as a cat's do when she sees a mouse. 
As the ducks rose from the water I fired, 
just one shot, for luck was with me that 
morning. The 2 fans fell. 

Then occurred what interested me more 
than anything else during the morning's 
delights. Guess struck the water almost at 
the instant of the crack of the gun. Four 
ducks had fallen. The nearest one was 
dead. The other 3 were floundering about 
in the water. The dog had to pass the dead 
one in order to reach the others, but he 
did not touch it. He picked up the next 
one, still alive, lifted it an instant, then 
dropped it dead on the water and going to 
the third did the same. He did not even 
stop swimming until he had killed all the 
live ones and laid the last one at my feet. 
Then one by one he brought the others in. 

During all that time I had not spoken a 
word nor made a motion to him. As he 



163 



164 



RECREATION. 



laid the last one down by the other 3, I 
reached into my poeket, pulled out a dough- 
nut and gave it to him with the promise 
that he should have 3 more when we 
reached home. This was in accordance 
with a solemn contract into which we had 
entered at the beginning of the season. My 
part of the agreement was a doughnut for 
every duck he should bring in. 

It may be a common thing for a dog to 
make sure every duck is dead before he. 
brings in any of them, but that was the first 
case I ever knew. I am not a little curi- 
ous to know, if Guess was an exception. Is 
it not possible for me to learn through 

RtCRE/.TION? 



The 2 crests secured that morning are 
still valued memorials of that trip. One 
holds an exalted place in the home of a 
friend, and the other stands on a bookcase 
in my study, the same beautiful creature 
as then. The crested merganser is, next to 
the wood duck, the most beautiful Ameri- 
can duck. He has a decided advantage of 
his rival in that he is far better to look on 
than to eat. That most beautiful of all 
American birds, the wood duck, ought to 
be protected from all hunters. If this is 
not soon done there will be none left, and 
another burning disgrace will belong to the 
indiscriminate hunter. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY CHAS. VANDERVELDE. 

THE OLD OAKEN BUCKET. 

Highly commended in Recreation's 8th Annual 
Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY WADE B. SMITH, PETOSKEY, MICH. 

THE INDOLENT CITIZEN. 

My favorite occupations, 
As the seasons come and go, 

Is cuttin' grass in winter 

And, in summer, shovelin' snow. 



Magistrate — There was no reason for you 
to assault this man and break his camera 
because he tried to take a snap shot of you. 
What else did he do? 

Prisoner — Nothing, Your Honor. He 
pressed the button, I did the rest. — Pennsyl- 
vania Grit. 



"This," said the city nephew, who was 
showing Uncle Si the beach, "emphazizes 
the difference between the country and the 
city. Now, here you will see the height of 
fashion in bathing costumes, and " 

"Yep," said Uncle Si. "Down ter hum 
we undress ter go in swimmin' an' dress 
up ter go to a dance, an' here it's jest the 
other way about." — Judge. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 

The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



CAN A NOVICE GET A DEER? 

G. A. WARBURTON. 

I am often asked whether a person with- 
out experience as a hunter can hope to get 
deer in the Adirondacks. Let me answer 
this inquiry with encouragement to the tyro. 
In the first place deer are much more plenti- 
ful than they were when hounding and jack- 
ing were permitted and each year sees an 
increase in their number. Not only are the 
laws better than formerly, but they are far 
more strictly observed. Both guides and 
sportsmen lealize that the future of hunting 
depends on this. In this respect New 
York is far ahead of Maine. The early 
hunting of deer, though preferred by some, 
is not generally successful, except around 
ponds and lakes, because when the leaves 
cover the trees and bushes it is hard to get 
near enough for a shot. There is not so 
much danger from other hunters later in 
the season and the chances of success are 
better. The antlers of the bucks have lost 
their velvet and the game is in prime con- 
dition for the table. 

The timidity of deer is their chief pro- 
tection, yet it is a mistake to suppose that 
they can not be outwitted. A good guide 
knows the habits of your quarry so well 
that if you will follow his instructions he 
will be able, under ordinary conditions, to 
give you a good shot. Of course the begin- 
ner should never hunt without a guide. It 
is false economy to try it. The guide knows 
the feeding grounds, and you do not, and 
you may be sure that the Adirondack guide 
will do his best for his employer. The 
sportsmen who think otherwise are usually 
those who have not acted squarely with 
their guides or who have been too stubborn 
or conceited to follow their advice. 

The first hunting trip I made was late in 
October. I had only 4 days to spare. Be- 
fore our train reached Utica it began to 
snow ; when we got into the woods the for- 
est was under a White mantle. The first 
day we saw nothing but signs. The snow 
was crusty and snapped under foot like egg 
shells. In the night the South wind rose 
and by morning the trees were dropping 
their white covering. 

We possessed our souls in patience until 
11 o'clock while the snow grew softer. The 
clouds disappeared and we started out. 
Hunting up the wind, the snow as soft as 
a bed of moss, taking a step or 2, then 
eagerly peering through the trees to find a 
deer, the conditions were ideal, for we gave 
forth neither scent nor sound, while our de- 
liberate and cautious movements greatly re- 
duced the chances of our being seen. The 



first deer to fall was a buck with good ant- 
lers. He was feeding up the sides of a lit- 
tle glen on a sunny slope. He fell after a 
leap or 2, shot through the shoulders, while 
the doe that was wilh him plunged back 
into the swamp. 

We moved on stealthily and had not gone 
half a mile before I discovered another deer, 
pushing away the snow for the beech nuts 
beneath. It was a small buck, but big 
enough to excite me so much that I missed 
him utterly. I can not tell how many shots 
I fired, but when calmer moments returned 
I remembered I had seen only the forward 
sight of my rifle. In the meantime the guide 
had killed a deer and before long I dropped 
another. We dragged them back to the 
camp on the snow and the next day we 
came out of the woods. 

I have hunted since for a longer time 
with scantier success, but have never but 
once gone to the Adirondacks on a hunt 
without killing my deer. After a dry spell 
the leaves are noisv and still hunting is out 
of the question. The only way then is to 
find a feeding ground and watch it, or, if 
you have a party, make a drive, having your 
guides chase the deer off the ridges down 
the runways where you are stationed. 

Once I took my seat on a high rock 
at the intersection of 2 runways that 
led down to a ford of the river. From 
about 9 o'clock in the morning I waited 
and watched for a deer to come. The red 
squirrels were busy in the dry leaves and 
as they scampered about they made noise 
enough for a deer. Growing discouraged and 
weary I sat listlessly musing when sudden- 
ly there was the snapping of a twisr, sha^ 
and distinct. Looking up I saw a big buck 
walking leisurely, with nose on the ground, 
down the side of the mountain straight to- 
ward where I sat. His great antlers gleamed 
in the sun. When he stopped behind a 
small spruce I fired as he stood broadside 
to me, and missed. I kept on shooting but 
it was not until I had shot 7 times that he 
went down, pierced by 4 of my bullets. 

As enjoyable a trip as any was that on 
which I was unsuccessful in finding game. 
There remains with me the memory of that 
day when I sat hours alone in the vast 
forest and felt the presence of that vital 
force in nature of which the poets have so 
often sung, but of which the consciousness 
comes only now and then to an ordinary 
mortal. The pulse beat of the earth was as 
real as the throbbing of my own heart. 

The man who expects to succeed in hunt- 
ing for deer must have the right place, a 
good repeating rifle, a measure of coolness 



165 



i66 



RECREATION. 



and patience, quick, accurate eyes, habits of 
observation, a guide who knows the coun- 
try, and physical vigor enough to stand 
fatigue and exposure if the weather be 
stormy. 



LAWBREAKERS IN TROUBLE. 

The following clipping from the Mil- 
waukee Free Press may interest yoUr 
readers. 

All the laws of Wisconsin relating to the hunt- 
ing of deer and even the Lacey act of the federal 
statutes were broken last week by Mayor A. 
Bergman, of Freeport, 111., and H. R. Nelson anc 1 
J. D. Hinds, of Lena, 111. As a result the party 
lost by confiscation the 6 deer th^t had been killed 
and about $400 worth of guns and other things 
which go to make up fine hunting outfits. 

By trying to ship the best portions of 5 deer 
out of the State in a trunk, they violated that 
section of the Lacey act which prohibits the ship- 
ment of game in concealment. By attaching the 
coupon from a resident license to the carcasses of 
the deer concealed in the trunk, which was checked 
to Lena, 111., the State law prohibiting the ship- 
ping of game out of the State on a resident license 
w.s violated, and in concealing the game in a 
trunk the statute providing that all game oliered 
to the railroads for transportation shall be properly 
labeled was broken. In addition to this J. D. 
Hincs, of Lena, 111., laid himself open to prose- 
cution for hunting without a license, by attempt- 
ing to use the resident license issued to T. J. 
Hinds, of Monroe, Wis. Incidentally, T. J. .Hinds 
is to be prosecuted for transferring his license to 
the Mr. Hinds, from Illinois. 

Mayor Bergman and his party appeared before 
Governor La Follette yesterday to explain the situ- 
ation and to extricate themselves if possible. He 
turned them over to Deputy G^rne Warden C. D. 
Nelson. They repeated the story to Mr. Nelson, 
who said he would investigate and that if he found 
the facts as they represented he would forward as 
many deer as they could produce non-resident 
licenses and would release their guns. Mr. Nelson 
has investigated and has found that the confisca- 
tion was warranted and proper. He will not re- 
lease either the deer or the hunting outfits, and if 
the party will not return to Wisconsin to stand 
trial under the State law he will turn them over 
to the federal authorities for prosecution under 
the Lacey act. 

The party had been hunting in the Northern 
part of the State and had secured 6 deer. When 
they started for home they took the train at In- 
gram, where they showed the carcass of one deer 
properly tagged and with the coupon of a non- 
resident license attached. They assured Game 
Warden J. W. Stone, who checked them up, that 
the one deer was all they had. Stone, how- 
ever, got on the train and went through the bag- 
gage car, where he found 2 trunks checked to 
H. R. Nelson, Lena, 111. They contained the best 
portions of 5 deer and hunting outfits worth about 
$300. When the train stopped at Cameron, he 
held both trunks and notified the department at 
Madison. 

The deer in the trunk were tagged and there 
was attached to one a coupon from the non-resident 
license of H. R. Nelson and to the others coupons 
from a resident license. Deputy Fish and Game 
Warden Nelson set out to run the whole thing 
down and he soon found that the resident license 
had been issued in the name of T. J. Hinds, of 
Monroe. He went to Monroe and secured from 
T. J. Hinds an affidavit that he had transferred 
his resident license to a party composed of H. R. 
Nelson, J. D. Hinds and A. Bergman. 

The venison will be shipped to the State Hos- 
pital for the Insane, and the guns and other 
things will be sold at auction. — Milwaukee Free 
Press. 



I also seized 2 deer from the train at Mil- 
waukee depot which were shipped by a 
Wisconsin hunter to Indiana. Under the 
Wisconsin law no deer -can be taken out of 
the State, save that a non-resident who has 
paid $25 for a hunting license may take 
home 2 deer if he accompanies them. 

About December 15th I seized, at the 
Northwestern depot in Milwaukee, a box 
or venison shipped by A. Radcliff of Eagle 
River. Radcliff was arrested December 
24th by Deputy Game Warden James Ober- 
holtzer and taken before Judge Coleman, 
where he pleaded guilty and was fined $25 
and costs. 

December 22nd I seized a bag containing 
venison in a baggage car of the C. M. & 
St. P. R. R. Inside I found tags with the 
names of Dodsworth and Vaughan, 2 high 
officials of the C. M. & St. P. They ex- 
pected to have the venison for their Christ- 
mas dinner, but it regaled the inmates of 
a State institution. The seizure was re- 
ported to the Michigan wardens and I hope 
they will catch the shipper. The same day 
I seized a lot of rabbits tagged to a Chicago 
game dealer. 
Valentine Raeth, State Deputy Warden, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mayor Bergman and his party undoubted- 
ly had lots of fun hunting and killing 6 
deer, but how blooming miserable they must 
have felt when they realized that instead of 
feasting on their venison at home it was 
eaten by a lot of unfortunate maniacs in the 
hospital at Madison. These Freeport fel- 
lows are also probably heaving many a sigh 
as they think of their fine guns and hunting 
dogs, all of which are doubtless highly 
prized and which are hereafter to be worn 
and used by plain ordinary sportsmen in 
and about Madison, Wisconsin. Mr. 
Mayor I advise you either to comply with 
the laws of any State in which you may 
hunt hereafter or stay at home. — Editor. 



AMERICANS AS GAME PROTECTORS. 

W. T. Hornaday, in the Zoological Society 
Bulletin. 

To-day the people of the United States 
may be divided into 3 camps. The larg- 
est contains those who know little of wild 
life, and are indifferent to its welfare. The 
next largest contains the persistent destroy- 
ers oi wild life, market hunters and fisher- 
men ; persons who pose as sportsmen, but 
are really pot hunters, and real sportsmen 
who shoot not wisely, but too well. The 
smallest body consists of the high-class 
sportsmen and the humane and broad mind- 
ed men and women who abhor the whole- 
sale slaughter of harmless creatures, who 
love wild life, and who are fighting to save 
the remnant from the annihilation which 
threatens it. . 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



167 



Americans are so busy building cities and 
States, amassing wealth and destroying the 
products of Nature wherever found, that 
they have up to this date been the most 
supine game protectors in the higher ranks 
of civilization. 

We purchased Alaska nearly 30 years be- 
fore the capture of Khartoum from the 
Madhi, but the wild animals of the Egyp- 
tian Soudan had game laws to protect them 
before those of Alaska shared their good 
fortune. The Egyptian Soudan has a Di- 
rector of the Department of Game Protec- 
tion, but even yet Alaska has- nothing of 
the kind. 

In America, the game protectors are to- 
day engaged in a hand to hand struggle 
with the annihilators of wild life. The 
United States Senate is considering Sena- 
tor Dillingham's bill No. 4166 for the repeal 
of the whole Alaskan game law. The only 
measure proposed in its stead is a flimsy 
and utterly useless license law to regulate 
the exportation of the hides, horns and flesh 
of the finest wild animals of Alaska. And 
this is solemnly proposed "to protect deer, 
moose and caribou in Alaska !" 

To-day there is a possibility that, despite 
the earnest protests of this Society, the 
League of American Sportsmen, the Boone 
and Crockett Club, the United States Bio- 
logical Survey, the Audubon Society, the 
Camp Fire Club and other organizations, 
the Senate of New York may pass the 
Hubbs bill, to repeal an excellent law against 
the spring shooting of water fowl. That 
measure has already passed the Assembly, 
and the game annihilators of Long Island, 
and of New York City also, are fighting hard 
for the repeal of the bill which now pre- 
vents them from shooting wild ducks dur- 
ing their breeding season ! 

From Pittsburg to Boston the sparrow 
eating Italians of Naples and Sicily are 
swarming afield on Sundays, killing song 
birds for food ! These lawless citizens now 
constitute such a menace to the lives of 
valuable insectivorous birds that it is ne- 
cessary to deal specially with *hem. Around 
Pittsburg, Columbus, and in many portions 
of Ohio, they have become a dangerous ele- 
ment. On Saturday, March 20th, 2 Italians 
were found killing squirrels in the Zoologi- 
cal Park. The one captured by Watch- 
man Van Benschoten spent 2 nights in jail, 
and was fined $5. 

The New York Zoological Society is com- 
posed chiefly of business men and practical 
women, who are far from being sentimental- 
ists. The organization stands for the pro- 
tection of wild life, of nearly every kind, 
everywhere, and at all times, save in proper 
and legitimate open season, not breeding 
seasons, for animals that may properly be 
classed as game. 



It is time for all persons outside the ranks 
of the Protectors to think on this subject, 
and decide whether they will join the ranks 
of the Protectors, or stand with the Annihi- 
lators. Ere long the indifferent must by 
default in good works be classed with the 
Annihilators ! 

I am glad to be able to report that Con- 
gress and ' the New York Legislature 
both adjourned without passing either of 
the nefarious measures referred to, and I 
hope they may never be revived. — 
Editor. 



OBJECTS TO THE BRANDING PROCESS. 

Your work in correcting game hogs is 
splendid, but your means do not justify the 
end. Why should your readers be bur- 
dened with photos and scenes of game 
hogs and their victims, also their number 
branded, in your game hog book? We do 
not pay our money to hear of other men's 
misdeeds, sad enough, 'tis true ; but don't 
you think the U. S. Government could do 
the branding and punishing? It seems to 
me like hitting a man when he is down, for 
what redress is there to a converted game 
hog when his photo and number are in a 
magazine entering thousands of homes, be- 
ing seen and discussed? Is it right? I 
shall continue to read your magazine, as 
your other reading matter is A No. 1. It 
always appeals to me as it must to every 
one who loves legitimate sport in its 
broadest sense. Your arguments against 
game hogs are persuasive and eloquent 
enough to deter all but the most hardened. 
Your aim is glorious, your purpose humane, 
but? 

Joseph E. Stuckert, Jersey City, N. J. 

I appreciate your point of view in regard 
to my game hog crusade. I have received 
other letters similar to yours and have 
answered them directly as well as through 
Recreation. For 20 years or more the 
various sportsmen's periodicals in this 
country have published mild protests 
against the slaughter of game, and they 
might as well have saved their space. The 
protests accomplished nothing. The 
slaughter of game was unchecked, the buf- 
falo was wiped out of existence, the pas- 
senger pigeon exterminated, elk nearly so, 
the slaughter of bird life was appalling, and 
the time had come when nothing but a 
method like mine could make the least im- 
pression on game hogs, fish hogs and the 
butchers who destroyed the birds. When 
I began this crusade, I stood ready to 
lose every friend I had, if necessary, 
in order to protect the remnant of our fast 
disappearing game. Instead of that, 
Recreation has made thousands of friends 



1 68 



RECREATION. 



among the best class of sportsmen in this 
country and Canada. The League of 
American Sportsmen, of which Recreation 
is the official organ, has a membership of 
over 10,000, with divisions in every State 
and Territory except one, and this maga- 
zine and League have done more to secure 
the passage and enforcement of just game 
laws than all other forces combined. If any 
of the game is saved in this country, the 
credit should be given to the League and 
to the method which has shame.d men who 
could not be reached in any other way. I 
have used this method without fear or dis- 
crimination, and solely for the purpose of 
saving the game. You say my means 
do not justify the end. On the contrary, 
the results obtained by Recreation and the 
League amply justify the means and prove 
my case. The League is recognized all 
over this country as the one power that is 
framing correct game laws and securing 
effective legislation to protect the game. 

In this day a man who deliberately 
slaughters game, or fish, or song or in- 
sectivorous birds is not deserving of any 
sympathy whatever. He can not possibh 
be classed as anything but an ignorant 
brute whom nothing but the most forcible 
method will reach. 

I note you object to paying for the re- 
production of photos of game hogs, etc. 
However, I give the readers of Recreation 
much more than 10 cents' worth of other 
material in each number of the magazine. 
I am sure you agree with me on that point, 
and I trust that on further consideration 
you may realize the necessity of my method. 

Editor. 



GOD'S CREATURES. 

Recreation prints "A Plea for the Bird 
Dog," based on the assertion that the dog 
is one of God's creatures. Doubtless he is, 
but have we any reason to suppose that 
birds, rabbits and deer are creatures of the 
devil ? 

"Flush the birds and give them a chance 
for life," is the dog user's cry, though well 
he knows that without the dog to point their 
location, thus giving ample time to prepare 
for action, their sudden and unexpected rise 
would be the very chance for life which he 
professes to ask for them. There is as 
much sportsmanship in shooting a deer 
driven past a stand, or a calf tied to a post, 
as there is in using a shot gun, charged with 
hundreds of miniature projectiles, over a 
trained pointer. 

As for giving birds and animals a chance 
for life, except for economy's sake, that is 
sheer nonsense. The ownership of a gun, 
a dog and a ferret bars such a plea. It is 
game the man is after and the average 
hunter thinks himself abused when his 



quarry proves too cunning for his skill. If 
the question of giving wild game a chance 
for lite is the vital argument in favor of 
game protection and the suppression of both 
dog and ferret,' let us not go gunning at all. 

But there is an economical side to the 
game question, and it is of far greater im- 
portance than a mere matter of sport. The 
fowls of the air and the beasts of the for- 
est are spoils as legitimate as the Thanks- 
giving turkey, the pet lamb or the fatted 
calf. They are a valuable food supply, Na- 
ture's voluntary bank deposit in favor of 
every individual, and every individual 
should insist that his share* be protected 
from unfair extermination. The dog-and- 
shot-gun men have already overdrawn their 
accounts and brought Nature's bank into 
a condition of insolvency. Their liabilities 
are equal to the entire sum necessary for 
present-day game protection. The superior 
sagacity of the dog has won for these men 
all the so-called honors of sportsmanship of 
which they boast. 

The true sportsman finds pleasure in the 
chase only when he matches his individual 
skill, as a woodsman, stalker and marks- 
man, against the cunning of fur and feath- 
er, and not in merely pressing the button 
while the dog does the rest. 

That domesticated wolf, the deer hound, 
nearly exterminated the best game animal in 
Pennsylvania, and the smaller game is rap- 
idly vanishing before the shot-gun man 
and that lesser wolf, the bird dog. Beasts 
and birds of prey do not kill wantonly, but 
only sufficient for their needs, and when 
they were plentiful game was also plenti- 
ful. But man pays a bounty for their des- 
truction, in order that his dog, a vicious, 
unnatural brute, and the most wantonly des- 
tructive of all quadrupeds, may have no 
competitors in the work of extermination, 
and no partner other than his own master. 

More human beings have died of rabies 
than ever fell victims to carnivorous beasts ; 
more sheep and lambs have been destroyed 
by dogs than were ever bred in any one 
year on the soil of Pennsylvania, and the 
value, to man, of the wild game wastefully 
destroyed by the aid of dogs, can not be 
computed in figures. Put a bounty on dogs, 
and Nature will quickly solve the prob- 
lem of restocking our fields and forests with 
game birds and game animals, and that 
without wasteful expense to private indi- 
viduals or to the State. 

Let the gunner be thrown wholly on his 
own resources ; let him pay for his educa- 
tion as we still hunters have, with many a 
long, hard tramp that brought no return, 
other than the pleasure of hunting, — a task 
so menial that Mr. Raymond delegates it 
to his dog, while he finds pleasure in gath- 
ering the spoils — and accounts them honor- 
able. E. D. Ladd, Oleona, Pa. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



169 



DE GUARDINER CONVICTED. 

We have just caught and liberated a car 
of quails, shipped from Tennessee as 
pigeons, by Genie De Guardiner whose 
home is in Natick, Mass., and who was 
with the birds. He was fined $2,000 and 6 
months' imprisonment. He had 1,200 birds, 
which he had bought and paid 30 cents 
each for. We consider this conviction a 
good thing. He swore that the quails were 
for breeding and going to State game com- 
missioners. This conviction may be a 
warning to other law breakers. 

Geo. Mason, Birmingham, Ala. 

I am mighty glad to know that De 
Guardiner has the opportunity to spend the 
summer in Alabama and to board at a hotel 
where he will have plenty of time to reflect 
on his past sins. A year or more ago he 
sent me a small ad for insertion in 
Recreation and on being asked for refer- 
ences gave me the names of several good 
people in Massachusetts where he then 
lived. On inquiring of these people they 
reported him as being honest and reliable, 
but all the same he failed to pay his adver- 
tising bill. I hope the State may succeed 
in collecting $2,000 from him, but it prob- 
ably will not. In that event he will be re- 
quired to spend several years in the custody 
of the sheriff. Meantime Tennessee's loss 
will be Alabama's gain in the matter of the 
distribution of quails. — Editor. 



The article by H. S. Ferrell in March 
Recreation shows that there are still some 
men who champion the hounding of deer. 
I am well used to the sort of men who 
want to have a dog do their hunting for 
them. To them, cruelty is sport. No man 
has any right to practice cruelty to animals 
under the name of sport. When he kills 
them for his own or others' use, let it be 
by means that cause no unnecessary suffer- 
ing. As to hunting in our Adirondack 
woods on horseback I should like to see 
any man try it. He would soon learn bet- 
ter. 

One reason I advocate still hunting is 
that one individual may not get so many 
deer, but more people get one than under 
the hounding system, when a few get all, 
and others nothing. The damage done by 
hounds running loose in the woods killing 
and eating young fawns when they can not 
help themselves, forever disposes of the 
theory that hounding is any protection to 
deer. Since the law of '97, measurably well 
obeyed, the phenomenal increase of deer 
here is strong argument against hounding. 

I have had to meet almost every kind of 

argument from men who loved brutal sport, 

and were too lazy to still hunt. Many of 

these men are now of my way of thinking. 

Rodney West, Minerva, N. Y. 



GAME NOTES. 
Gunners and fishermen report that there are 
large numbers of ducks in lower Delaware river 
and in Delaware bay. Harry C. Clark, of Dela- 
ware City, killed 52 wild duck on the river 
Tuesday. They were black ducks and mallards. — 
Wilmington (Del.) Every Evening. 

I am a lover of good honest sport, both 
with gun and rod, and I detest a hog. That 
there is at least one such critter in Dela- 
ware the above clipping shows. 

Harry E. Link, Wilmington, Del. 

In answer to a letter inquiring as to the 
truth of the newspaper report, I received 
the following: 

Yes; I killed 54 ducks in 3 hours. That 
was my best day's sport this season. Last 
March (1903) I killed 198 ducks in 5 days, 
shooting about 6 hours each day. 

Harry C. Clark, Delaware City, Del. 

This shows that you are not only a hog 
but that you are lamentably ignorant of the 
principles of good sportsmanship. If you 
had been a reader of good literature you 
would have known that such a declaration 
as this would result in your being con- 
demned and despised by decent sportsmen 
everywhere. Your name goes down in the 
swine book as number 1045. — Editor 

I must take exception to the statement 
made by Allan Brooks in April Recreation, 
that the flesh of the red breasted mergan- 
ser, Mugus serrator, (Coaies) , is at all times 
uneatable. The fact is that these birds, 
properly cooked, make not only a palatable 
stew but an excellent roast as well. On 
my shooting trips during 20 years I have 
cooked dozens of them, and people have en- 
joyed them who thought they could not 
eat any kind of wild fowl. Personally I 
prefer brant, black mallard, teal, blue bills, 
whistlers, etc., but if you know how to cook, 
a "shell bird" is by no means to be despised. 
Isaac Hills, Nantucket, Mass. 



You remember the entertainment we pre- 
pared for you at the meeting in St. Paul 
in the shape of a seizure of 11 saddles of 
venison and over 600 grouse. Well, the 
grand jury failed to indict at the first term, 
but we brought the matter up again and got 
2 indictments. Mr. Ertz has been tried on 
the first and has paid a fine of $500. The 
other indictment hangs over until next 
term. Such fines as these will make some 
of the lawbreakers think that the business 
is not all profit. 

Sam Fullerton, St. Paul, Minn. 



During my hunting trips over the country 
I notice that hawks, owls and foxes have 
done great damage to birds and rabbits. 
Such vermin would all be shot if there was 
a bounty on their scalps. Could you not 
introduce a bill in Congress to that effect? 
In November I shot a duck hawk, a rarity 



i;o 



RECREATION. 



in York county. This bird and its mate 
had cleaned out a flock of quails and when 
I shot it the 2 were fighting over a rabbit. 
A. J. Fisher, York, Pa. 



Recreation is much appreciated in 
Texas. We have lately organized a gun 
club here of 25 charter members and offer 
a reward of $25 for a violation of the 
game law. We made the same offef'Tast 
year and only had one conviction, at a cost 
of $45 for the 3 birds he killed. There 
was no other violation of the law. Keep 
up your good fie^ht on the game hogs. 

W. S. Peace, Del Rio, Texas. 



In the 6 years 1 have been a sportsman 
quails have never been so scarce as at pres- 
ent. Game hogs have potted them all. I 
have as fine a pointer as ever went into 
cover, yet I never killed over 15 quail in a 
day, even when they were abundant. All 
sportsmen should be members of the L. A. 
S. and help protect the game. 

* Ed. Bliss, St. Paul, Ind. 



The first day of the open season on rab- 
bits fell on Sunday last fall, and of course 
sportsmen did not hunt until Monday. But 
while driving Sunday afternoon, I met 3 
fellows with a hound and no less than 14 
rabbits. There is little encouragement to 
be decent when such things are permitted. 
J. D. Gossler, Allentown, Pa. 



Through the united efforts of the sports- 
men in Northwestern Pennsylvania, we suc- 
ceeded in getting a bill through the Legis- 
lature which prohibited the shooting of 
woodcock in July, but for some unaccount- 
able reason the Governor refused to sign it. 
C. B. Hall, Erie, Pa. 



The season has, so far, been unusually 
propitious and I believe there will be more 
birds here than lor many years. Certainly 
this will be the case if the calls of Bob 
White indicate their presence. Wild tur- 
keys also promise to be abundant. 

Margaret Buford, Lawrenceville, Va. 



I notice in May Recreation Jean Alli- 
son's reply to Dr. Brigham of Indianapolis, 
in regard to eating deer liver. Though my- 
self a Hoosier M.D. from Indianapolis, I 
must say that Brother Allison is right in 
every particular. 

J. Q. Allen, Telluride, Col. 



We have but few chickens and quail, 
although rabbits are abundant and in the 
fall duck shooting is good. We still have 
an open season on ducks in the spring, but 
every Legislature adds some restriction to 
our game laws. C. Holdfer, Perry, la. 



The game of this State needs more pro- 
tection. Grouse, quails and pheasants are 
nearly exterminated. Duck shooting is 
still excellent. Deer are scarce. Bear are 
numerous from June to August. 

W. J. McPoland, Long Branch, Wash. 



Game is plentiful here, especially grouse. 
Quails are less numerous. Game laws are 
not well enforced. We have wardens but 
tney shirk their duty. 

J. E. Hubbard, Athol, Wyo. 



Deer are becoming plentiful here. The 
open season of 10 days is long enough. An 
effort is being made to extend the season 
but I hope it will fail. 

J. L. McAllister, Warren, Vt. 



In spite of the long and severe winter 
chickens and grouse went through in good 
shape. There were large numbers of them 
to breed last spring. 

Frank W. Blake, Fort Totten, N. D. 



This is the greatest country for quails 
that I ever saw. However, I have killed 
more hawks than quails in my 8 years of 
residence here. 

D. C. Green, Bartow, Florida. 



Last season was the greatest for ducks, 
wild geese, deer and all kinds of game that 
we have had for many years in this section. 
J. T. Collins, Morgan City, La. 



I live in the center of the best hunting 
and fishing section of Pennsylvania. Last 
season I killed 2 deer and 3 bear. 

Walter J. Bachman, Oleona, Pa. 



We have many quails and rabbits, but 
our game laws are little respected and the 
pot hunter is always at work. 

M. J. Crawford, Wapakoneta, O. 



Our new game law is being enforced to 
the letter. We have 3 Mexicans in jail now 
for trapping and selline- quails. 

I. J. Bush, M.D, El Paso, Tex. 



Ducks are plentiful here. Our hunters 
are not game hogs and know when they 
have enough. 
Kenneth Hughes, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Quails are scarce here. We did not have 
much duck shooting last season. Rabbits 
were, abundant. 

L. A. Jaeger, Independence, Iowa. 



Game is scarce in this vicinity, a few rab- 
bits and quails being all that remains. 

Ira Owen, Fruit Port, Mich. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kingnsh-^Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September.*- Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
siiedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-fish, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel — Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Head. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs,- 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait: Skinner crab. Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Blackfish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime, flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide: Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish August to "No- 
vember. Haunts: Rivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; _ trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead— June to October Haunts: Surf 
and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: Surf, all tideways. Baits: Shedder 
crabs, surf mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. < 

Blue Fish — Horse Mackerel. June to November 
1st. Haunts: Surf, open sea and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



HOW I STOLE HIS TROUT. 

I was spending a delightful vacation at 
Ayers', on Lake Duane, in the North woods, 
and from the lake, the Twin ponds near 
and the cold spring in the Little Salmon 
river, into which the lower Twin empties, 
I had taken many lively trout ; but of all I 
caught that season no catch was so sensa- 
tional as the one trout I took at the boat 
dock just below the hotel. 

Late one afternoon, the ladies having gone 
to their rooms to dress for supper. I was 
sitting on the piazza alone, enjoying the 
delightful atmosphere and watching the 
changing cloud effects in the West as the 



hour of sunset drew near, the sun having 
already disappeared behind' the topmost 
peak of the mountain. After a while I felt 
inclined to descend the stairway to the 
landing, and them turned my steps along the 
shore of the lake toward the boat house, 
where I could se^ my friend Bronson, the 
Wall street banker, fishing. By the time I 
reached the dock I found him taking his 
rod apart and with an air of impatience 
preparing to return to the hotel. 

"Hello! what luck?" I inquired. 

"None," Bronson replied ; 'I've been fish- 
ing here 2 hours without a bite, except 
these miserable chubs," and he pointed to 
several specimens scattered about the plat- 
form. Some he had cut up and used for 
bait in the endeavor to lure the trout when 
his best flies had failed to tempt them. 

Spying a particularly good looking piece 
of chub at my feet I said, 

"It's a shame to waste this good bait. 
Why not try once more?" But Bronson 
shook his head and continued his prepara- 
tions for deserting the place. 

Against the boat house stood a slim rough 
pole which some boy had cut in the woods, 
and dangling from its end was a piece of 
white twine 4 or 5 feet long, to which was 
attached a large hook. 

I picked up the attractive portion of the 
chub which Bronson had rejected, put it on 
the great hook and splashed it carelessly 
into the lake. Instantly it was seized and 
I drew out a trout 9 inches long ! Detach- 
ing it from the line I held it up and said, 

"There is an example of expert angling! 
Given a long slim sapling, a piece of cotton 
twine and a hook big enough to catch a 
pickerel, with a huge chub bait, the result 
is a trout fit to grace a king's table !" 

I was not congratulated. Bronson was 
mad. He disgustedly exclaimed, 

"That is the meanest thing I've experi- 
enced this summer. You come and steal 
my trout under my very eyes !" 

Laughing at his discomfiture, I replied, 

"Well, let's go up to the house and show 
the other fellows what an angler can do !" 
Henry T. Gray, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WANTS NETTING LEGALIZED. 
I am a thorough sportsman with gun and 
rod, but fishing is my specialty and speckled 
trout are my pet fish. I hope to be able 
thixugh your aid to change some of the 
fish laws of New York State. I have fished 
with hooks, flies and nets and have studied 
the habits of fishes for 30 years in the 
Adirondack lakes and streams. What I 
have learned I am prepared to prove. I 
have never slaughtered fish needlessly. My 



171 



172 



RECREATION. 



business was guiding, and I have guided 
all manner of men, from the most stubborn 
hog to the genuine conscientious sportsman 
who knew when to quit. 

I ask you pointedly, did our Creator place 
these beautiful fishes in the waters of this 
earth for our amusement, for man to tor- 
ture for sport, or were they placed here 
for food to be propagated and protected as 
a farmer would raise his chickens or lambs ? 

Which is better, to catch 20 trout for one 
pound or 10 trout for 20 pounds ? 

I once guided 2 rich New York city 
sportsmen up a trout stream. They drank 
about 10 bottles of beer and 2 of whiskey, 
and tortured 275 speckled trout to death 
with a fish hook through their heads. The 
275 fish weighed 15 pounds. I received $3 
for my day, which was spent climbing trees 
and diving in the brook to unfasten their 
hooks. That same evening a friend of 
mine, a farmer, 'drove 16 miles to visit me 
and get a mess of fish for his family. We 
took a net with a proper sized mesh and 
no whiskey or beer, and in 2 hours' time 
my friend was on his way home with 12 
trout, which weighed 22 pounds. These 
trout were killed instantly without any suf- 
fering from barbed hooks in their heads. 

It has been many years since I have 
owned or fished with a net. I adhere strict- 
ly to the law, which I think is the quickest 
way to make right a law which is wrong ; 
but I claim that the only proper way to 
catch fish in the majority of the Adirondack 
waters is with net, with a proper sized 
mesh. If hook fishing were to be prohibit- 
ed and net fishing allowed, our State hatch- 
eries could be dispensed with and our 
brooks and lakes would soon be overstocked 
by nature's own course. I am prepared to 
prove all my statements and I leave this 
letter for open debate. Will gladly answer 
any one caring to write me concerning this 
matter. 

C. E. Merrill, Merrill, N. Y. 



TROUT BEST FOR WASHINGTON WATERS. 
I have on my place a lake covering about 
4 acres. It has no visible inlet, but the 
water remains 6 feet deep throughout the 
year and is about 10 feet deep in the 
spring. There are a good many weeds 
growing in the lake. I should like to stock 
the water with some kind of fish but do not 
know what species would be best. Will 
you please tell me what kind you think 
would thrive in such a lake? Where can I 
get the spawn? When must I put the 
spawn in the lake? 

Arthur Borak, Rocklyn, Wash. 

ANSWER. 

The probabilities are that the lake would 
be most suitable for black spotted trout, a 
species native to most of the waters of 



your State. If you do not care to try trout, 
the yellow perch, which has been introduced 
into Lake Union and other lakes about 
Seattle, would doubtless do well. You 
could probably obtain a supply of yellow 
perch from some fisherman at Lake Union, 
or you coul-d easily collect them yourself. 
Trout could be obtained from the Bureau 
of Fisheries station, Bozeman, Montana, by 
application to the Commissioner of Fish 
and Fisheries, Washington, D. C. 

It is not advisable to put black bass into 
any of the waters of Washington or Ore- 
gon, as they harm the trout, which will al- 
ways remain better fish for those States 
than the black bass. No one will ever go 
to Washington or Oregon for black bass 
fishing. If he should want that sort of 
sport he will go to the upper Mississippi 
valley or elsewhere in the East ; but good 
trout fishing will attract not only residents 
of the State, but people from the East to 
the lakes and streams of Washington and 
Oregon. B. W. E. 



^BOUT FLY FISHING. 

I beg space for a few words in reply to 
an article called Fly Fishing which ap- 
peared in a weekly paper of March 19th. 
I quote in part from the article in question: 

"Such a lot of fudge has been written 
about fly fishing that a voice from the wil- 
derness can have little effect. Fly fishing is 
a sport that requires wisdom, experience, 
and skill, sometimes. Sometimes ignorance 
achieves equal results with the artificial 
fly." 

The writer says many men can cast 
an artificial fly, but few are able to cast a 
live fly with the delicacy and accuracy ne- 
cessary. Possibly the author of that article, 
celebrated fly fisherman and honored au- 
thority that he is, would condescend to 
publish a treatise on live fly casting, <~>r 
"How to cast 180 feet with a 4 ounce rod 
without a back cast" ! Surely the fly fish- 
ing fraternity would recognize the immense 
value of such a treatise. 

Have any readers of this article on fly 
fishing ever heard that a trout is at certain 
times in position for the fly, and that 
when this center of the stage is filled the 
trout there will invariably take the fly? Do 
I hear you say you have not? Fie on 
you for an untutored fisherman ! You 
should know at once when a trout is in 
such a fix that he must take the fly cast 
over him ! 

I am no angler, and if C. W. R. 
would, out of the fulness of his heart and 
his well stocked mind, publish a book of 
one and a half pages on fly fishing I would 
subscribe for a copy with the greatest 
pleasure. 

L. M., South Braintree, Mass. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



173 



A NEW USE FOR THE SHIRT WAIST. 

It has long been supposed that the only 
object of the shirt waist was to make wom- 
en feel comfortable and look pretty, but a 
Pennsylvania woman has discovered an- 
other. The story runs thus : 

Mrs. John Lebo and her son, William, 
recently went trouting on Potato creek, in 
Cameron county. A warden called on them 
during the day to see how they were mak- 
ing out. On examining the young man's 
fish basket he found 30 trout under the 
legal length, but the mother's creel was 
empty. The warden could not believe the 
lady had failed to catch a trout so he made 
a further investigation and found 35 trout, 
less than 6 inches in length, in her shirt 
waist. The ingenious mother and her 
blooming son were taken into court and 
fined $10 for each undersized fish, aggre- 
gating $650. This precious pair went to 
jail at first, but later paid their good money 
into court and went out into the cold, cruel 
world where they are now busy hating the 
game warden. 

If other women should decide to adopt 
this combination shirt waist and trout 
basket it would be well for them to have 
the garment made of chilled steel and pro- 
vided with time locks, so that inquisitive 
wardens might not break in and confis- 
cate. — Editor. 

NIBBLES. 

Deputy Game and Fish Warden H. E. 
Caldwell, of Nashua, N. H., recently ar- 
rested Denis Sweeney and Patrick Igo, of 
Auburn, Sonnie Grover, Frank Burton, 
Oner Vigneault, Frank Boudreau and Fred 
St. Cyr, of Manchester, on a charge of fish- 
ing in a brook that had been closed in ac- 
cordance with a law of that State. The 
men were taken before Justice Emery, where 
they were fined $18.37 each. The stream in 
question had been closed several years 
past and numerous signs along the banks 
announced that fact to the public. These 
men deliberately violated the law and it is a 
great satisfaction to know that they were 
required to pay good prices for their fun. — 
Editor. 

Frank Petray and R. D. Newland, of 
Petaluma, Cal., went fishing with dynamite. 
Deputy fish commissioners Ingalls and Lea 
overhauled the men and took them before 
a justice of the peace where Newland was 
fined $20 and Petray was held to the Su- 
perior Court. When the' trial came up in 
that tribunal Judge A. B. Burnett took a 
hand in the game and assessed Petray $250. 
Judge Burnett is another hero in the cause 
of game and fish protection. — Editor. 



fish in the White river. He attached fuses 
to several sticks of dynamite, lighted them 
and threw them into the river but held 
on to one of them a little too long and it 
exploded in his hands. His arms and legs 
were blown off, his body horribly mutilated 
and he died before his companions could 
reach him. — Editor. 

Martin Kennedy, Jr., and Walter Wells, 
of Ogdensburg, N. Y., went fishing with 
dynamite in the St. Lawrence river. A 
game warden interrupted them in their 
butchery, took them into court and Ken- 
nedy was fined $60 and sentenced to 3 
months in jail. Wells was also given 3 
months in jail, so the 2 will have an equal 
chance to repent of their cussedness. — 
Editor. 



Will some reader of Recreation please 
tell me which one of the Rangely lakes, 
Maine, affords the best fishing? Also name 
a good hotel or camp to stop at, not more 
than 25 miles from the railroad station. 
High elevation preferred. Also state if 
same place is a good hunting locality for 
both deer and ruffed grouse. » 

H. L. F., Monticello, N. Y. 



Can bullheads or perch be legally netted 
in any lake in New York State? 

H. M. G., Syracuse, N. Y. 

As I understand the laws of this State 
there is no close season on perch or bull- 
heads. — Editor. 



Fishing here is poor, there being but few 
bass, pike or pickerel, and everybody is 
allowed to fish as he pleases, chiefly be- 
cause we have no game warden. 

C. Holdfer, Perry, Iowa. 



Scott Gregory, of Martinsville, Ind., got 
what he deserved while dynamiting for 



A LIBERAL TRANSLATION. 

La vie est vaine; 

Un peu d'amour, 
Un peu de haine, 

Et puis, bonjour. 

This life is — nit ! 
Love spieles one song, 
Hate throws one fit; 
And then, so long ! 

La vie est breve ; 

Un peu d'espoir, 
Un peu de reve, 

Et puis, bonsoir. 

This life ist kurz ! 

Some hopes — but schlimm 
Some dreams — by spurts ; 

Then — douse the glim ! 

— The Sphinx. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 

Anybody can shoot all day but a gentleman always quits when he gets enough. 



AMMUNITION FOR THE OLD COLT. 

In answer to W. O. Brown, Youngs- 
town, Ohio, whose letter appeared iri'^your 
June number: if possible, he should ob- 
tain the old fashioned combustible envelope 
cartridges for his powder and ball Colt 
revolver, which, according to his state- 
ment of caliber and length of barrel (.36 
caliber, 7 l / 2 inch), was known as the navy 
or belt pistol. The No. 10 U. M. C. per- 
cussion cap will fit the nipples, but those 
made by Ely Bros., London, are better. 

To load such a pistol proceed thus: 
Half cock the arm,* press the cap on the 
nipples in the cylinder, seeing that they 
are pushed all the way down. If they are 
not firmly seated the cylinder will jam in 
revolving. Having capped the pistol drop 
a cartridge into a chamber and ram it 
down with the ramrod attached to the 
barrel. Let the ramrod remain in the 
loaded chamber until the next cartridge is 
dropped into the adjoining chamber, when 
it must be withdrawn. Then turn the 
cylinder and ram down the second cart- 
ridge, as before. Repeat this operation 
until each chamber contains a cartridge, 
when the weapon is ready for use. 

If these cartridges can not be obtained 
bullets must be either bought or made for 
the arm. A powder flask with a charger 
that will carry at each filling the proper 
charge for a .38 short Colt metallic cart- 
ridge is also required. Cap the arm as 
before and then put a charge of about 15 
grains' weight in each chamber. This is 
right for the long bullet, but 10 grains is 
best for a round ball. The bullets must 
be a little large for the chambers so that 
some force will be required to ram them 
in position. They can not then slip for- 
ward and prevent the revolution of the 
cylinder, nor can one cylinder be accident- 
ally discharged by the flame from its 
neighbor. 

I have found it possible to buy the old 
style Colt double bullet moulds in second 
hand stores or junk shops here in 
Baltimore and presume they can be 
found in similar places in other cities. A 
few gun dealers also have them. The 
only sizes I have seen are .265, .31, .36 and 
.44 caliber. Each will cast a conical and 
a round bullet. The cartridges are lubri- 
cated, but these homemade bullets should 
be dipped in melted tallow before being 
used. 

*It is much better and safer to load first 
and put the caps on afterward. Many a man 
has died with his boots on because he put the 
cap on first. — Editor. 



F. F. G. black powder should be used 
for a .36 caliber pistol. Never use smoke- 
less powder in any weapon not originally 
intended for it. 

As for accuracy Mr. Brown will find the 
round bullet more satisfactory than the 
other, but I believe the cartridges were 
all made with long bullets. Some of these 
old pistols are accurate and strong 
shooters. It is possible for an expert to 
make as good targets with them as with 
a modern weapon of the same make. The 
old pistols are made with a gain twist, 
which may have something to do with their 
steadiness when fired, although their weight 
also contributes to this stability. If the 
barrel and cylinder are removed from the 
frame and cleaned after shooting, one of 
those old pistols will last a long time and 
give its possessor much pleasure. 

Revolver, Baltimore, Md. 

In June Recreation W. O. Brown re- 
quests information as to loading the old 
style Colt powder and ball pistol. The 
arm he speaks of, 36 caliber, is the navy 
pattern ; the old Colt army was 44 caliber. 
For ranges up to 20 yards use round ball 
and not to exceed 15 grains F. F. G. pow- 
der. For ranges up to 50 yards use conical 
ball and 13% grains of powder. Use Ely 
Bros. Colt pistol caps, and in using conical 
balls always grease them. Do not use any 
smokeless powder in this arm if you want 
to remain on earth. 

I have shot many Colt cap and ball guns. 
They shoot where held up to 40 yards, but 
as the sights on them are po'or, I could 
never do much beyond that distance. With 
good sights either the Army or Navy pat- 
tern should be good for an 8 inch bull's 
eye at 85 yards, and that, in my opinion, is 
the limit of the arm. 

Has any reader of Recreation ever tried 
the Colt automatic pistol, either 32 or 38 
caliber, rimless smokeless cartridges? Are 
they sure fire, accurate and certain to eject 
shell? What pentration do they give, and 
are they liable to get out of order easily? 

I often wonder why Recreation readers 
do not write more about the capabilities of 
different arms and cover all points inter- 
esting to users of rifles, guns and re- 
volvers. We all have our opinions of arms 
we use. Why not give them and our 
reasons therefore? 

W. M. Pugh, Baltimore, Md. 

Answering W. O. Brown I have used 
many Colt cap and ball pistols. They are 
good shooting irons when the right man 
is behind them. Load them with any good 



174 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



175 



rifle powder and use a measuring charger. 
Powder and ball should fill the cylinder 
chambers y 2 to 2-3 full ; the remaining 
space may be filled with beef tallow. Use 
Ely's double waterproof caps. They are 
strong and will not fly in pieces. Be sure 
they fit the tubes snugly so the concussion 
of one charge will not displace the remain- 
ing caps. Do not seat the ball too hard on 
the powder; gentle pressure is all that is 
needed. A good rest for pistol shooting 
can be made from a light strap or a strip of 
buckskin. Cut a slit in one end and put 
your thumb through it ; carry the strap 
around your neck and grip the other end 
with your left hand. By raising or lower- 
ing that hand the pistol is brought to the 
proper position, while the weight of the 
weapon and of the right hand is sustained 
by the strap. 

George L. Maus, The Dalles, Ore. 



ANSWERING S. B. 

In November Recreation S. B., of St. 
John, N. B., requests information about the 
32-40 lavage rifle. I bought one of these 
rifles last fall and have given it a thorough 
test, though I have not had an opportunity 
to try it on large game. This particular 
rifle has a full octagon barrel, shot gun 
butt, and a specially adjusted trigger-pull 
of 4 pounds. It is fitted with a Lyman 
No. 2 rear sight with cup disc, and a com- 
bination No. 5 front sight. This makes 
a perfect combination for target and hunt- 
ing purposes. The cup disc used in con- 
nection with the pin-head front sight is 
excellent for target shooting, while the 
large aperture and ivory front sight are 
adapted for the quick sighting usually 
necessary for shots at game. 

The twist of rifling in nearly all rifles 
chambered for the 32-40 cartridge is 1 in 
16. 

The accuracy of the 32-40 regular cart- 
ridge is conceded, at ranges of 200 or 300 
yards, to be equal or superior to any other, 
unless it be the 38-55. For the high pres- 
sure cartridge the makers claim 4 inch 
groups of 10 shots at 200 yards, which is 
about as good as the fine target rifles are 
capable of making under the ordinary con- 
ditions. In testing my rifle at rest at 25, 50 
and 100 yards tne accuracy seemed to be 
all that could be desired. The recoil of 
the high pressure cartridge is heavier than 
that of the regular black powder cartridge 
but is not unpleasant. 

As regards the comparative accuracy of 
32-40, 303 Savage, 30-30 and 30-40 cart- 
ridges, I believe the 32-40 superior to the 
others at the shorter ranges, say up to 400 
yards. Over that distance, the 30-40 will 
take first place. Indeed, the latter cart- 
ridge has been so much improved the past 
2 years that it may be considered superior 



to anything made, at the longer range. It is 
also more powerful than the 3 others. 
Next in order, in regard to striking en- 
ergy, come the 32-40 high pressure, .303 
Savage and the 30-30. The 32-40 h. p. al- 
though having a lighter bullet than the 
.303 has a greater striking energy owing 
to greater muzzle velocity, which is 2100 
and 1950 foot seconds respectively. 

The black powder cartridge correspond- 
ing to the above is the 32-40 Ballard. 
The 32-40 Remington, I believe, is a differ- 
ent cartridge, though the Remington peo- 
ple also chamber their rifles for the 32-40 
Ballard shell. 

Preference for a rifle or a shot gun butt 
is largely a matter of taste. As a general 
thing a rifle butt is to be preferred for 
target shooting, while a shot gun butt is 
better for hunting as it can be brought to 
the shoulder quicker. For all around use 
I prefer the latter. 

The principal advantages of the 32-40 
high pressure rifle and cartridge are the 
slow twist and straight shell, rendering re- 
loading medium and reduced charges an 
easy matter. Using various charges of 
smokeless and semi-smokeless powder I 
get fair accuracy at 50 and 100 yards, from 
rest. Several groups, of 5 shots each, made 
at the shorter range will' cut a dime, while 
the poorest are on an inch circle. The bul- 
let used was one of the Ideal Company's 
newest designs, No. 319247, cast 1 to 16; 
primers, U. M. C. No. 7 J / 2 . 

S. B. can make no mistake in getting a 
Savage rifle chambered for the 32-40 cart- 
ridge, while the value of the rifle will be 
doubled by having Lyman sights fitted to it. 
32-40 H. P., Halifax, N. S. 



MUST SHUT OUT GAME HOGS. 

I have been a constant reader of your 
excellent magazine for several years, and 
have greatly enjoyed your roasting of the 
hogs. Keep after them, and perhaps in 
time you can show them what all decent 
men think of them. Your request in July 
Recreation that we should write to all 
hogs denounced in Recreation is an ex- 
cellent idea, and hereafter I intend to write 
to at least part of them, and hope before 
long that it will be a rare thing to read of 
their exploits. 

If Recreation readers will write the 
hogs denounced by you it will do more to 
protect the game than anything yet under- 
taken. Don't be afraid of hurting their 
feelings. Tell them just what you think 
of them. 

We have an open season on ducks here 
in the spring, but the sportsmen have done 
such excellent work against it that I think 
it will be changed by the next Legislature. 
In fact, several of the large clubs here last 
spring would not shoot nor allow out- 



176 



RECREATION. 



siders to shoot on their grounds, and in- 
serted notices in all the papers to that ef- 
fect. Even the dealers in guns and am- 
munition were advising their would-be 
patrons to wait till fall, something they de- 
serve great credit for; the Western Arms 
and Sporting Goods Co. as usual taking 
the lead. You are right about the auto- 
matic shot gun, but I can not agree with 
you in classing the repeater with it, as I 
have used a repeating shot gun for years 
and have never made a- hog of myself. 
I consider it the best cheap gun on the 
market ; but in case the sportsmen decide 
that repeaters must go, I will be among 
the first to change, though in the hands of 
a man who has any respect for himself I 
consider it an ideal cheap gun. 

I have used a Savage .303, fitted with 
Lyman sights, for several years, and con- 
sider it perfection. I recently got a Savage 
.22, and am well pleased with it. 

Getting Recreation at the news stands, 
has one drawback; you either have to get 
it as soon as it comes, or go without it, 
as copies are bought as soon as received. 
I always have one put away for me to be 
sure of getting it, as if left in sight the 
chances are I would not get it. 

L. R. Metz, Salt Lake, Utah. 

As I have repeatedly said in Recreation, 
I would have no objection to allowing de- 
cent men to use pump guns or even auto- 
matic guns. What I do object to, most 
rigidly, is allowing such weapons to be 
sold to market hunters and other game 
hogs; and if we allow the weapons to be 
sold at all, these men will be the principal 
buyers. This is the only reason why I am 
advocating the passage of laws in all the 
States to prohibit the sale of such guns. 

Editor. 



SMALL SHOT. 

R. B. Stowers of Cupio, Ky., said in Jan- 
uary Recreation that he thought the world 
would be better off without the .22 rifle, 
and that the price should be raised to keep 
them out of the hands of irresponsible per- 
sons or a tax put on their use. I have read 
a good deal in Recreation about game 
hogs. There are also other kinds of hogs, 
the kind, for instance, that want to hog 
all the pleasure in the world. 

Mr. Stowers is evidently one of that 
sort. I am the owner of a 22 and I think 
the world would be better off if the pump 
gun were prohibited. Most men would be 
richer today, had they not spent 75, 100 or 
125 dollars for a gun. 

You can have as much sport with a 22 
rifle as you can with a shot gun where 
there is only small game. 

M. J. G., Warren, O. 



ville, Ohio, gives in July Recreation will 
not harm the Stevens Arms Co. No gun 
is yet perfect, and that the shot gun Mr. 
Book had first happened to be defective is 
no sign they all are. 

I do not believe in running a good com- 
pany down because the president withdrew 
his ad from Recreation, and anybody who 
thinks can see that Mr. Shields feels the 
same way. 

I do not believe the automatic shot guns 
have come to stay, for it will not take long 
for the public to see the damage they do. 
Sportsmen should stand by Mr. Shields in 
his fight, for he will win in the end, no 
matter how many porkers squeal. 

Allyn H. Tedmen, Ridgefield, N. J. 



Answering Small Game, W. Lebanon, 
Pa., would say that of the 5 guns he names 
it is hard to say which is best. It depends 
wholly on the notions of the chooser. The 
Parker would be my choice. Shot spread- 
ers will not make a full choked gun shoot 
as large a pattern as a cylinder bore. A 
short barrel, right open, left modified, will 
be best for close range wing shooting. A 
12 gauge is best for grouse, rabbits, and 
at the trap. If a gun is wanted for both 
purposes get 2 pairs of barrels, one as 
described for brush shooting and one pair 
30 inch full choke for trap shooting. 

Select a slow beagle for hunting rabbits, 
no matter what his size. I prefer a large 
one. 

J. B. C, Johnstown, Pa. 



In answer to Pump Gun and to Repeater, 
I will cite one instance in which the pump 
gun was made a game hog's gun of the vil- 
est type. 

One day last fall a man, armed with a 
Winchester repeating shot gun, its maga- 
zine fully charged with shells loaded with 
buck shot, was watching a runway in 
Pennsylvania. A large doe ran past him 
followed by 3 fawns. The gun was fired as 
fast as possible, killing one fawn ; the rest 
escaped, all more or less wounded. This, 
to me, is proof enough of the damnable 
possibilities of the pump gun. Heaven help 
the game when the hogs use the automatic 
shot gun or rifle. 

Davy Crockett, Ardmore, Pa. 



Such warning as S. M. Book, of Rush- 



In reply to Henry Wiggins, Jr., I will say 
that a .25-20, '92 model,' Winchester re- 
peater, 24 inch barrel, fitted with Lyman 
No. 1 combination rear, No. 4 ivory hunt- 
ing front and No. 6 leaf sights, comes as 
near filling the bill for all around work as 
any gun he can get. It is small enough for 
squirrels or rabbits and powerful enough for 
woodchucks, turkeys, coyotes, or even deer. 
The load will not admit of much variation. 
I get good results, at a low cost, from re- 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



177 



loaded ammunition in Winchester shells, 
using regular charge of 17 grains Hazard 
3 F-G powder and 86 grain bullet, 1 part 
tin to 16 of lead using Ideal reloading tool 
No. 4. 

F. L. Palmer, Haileyville, I. T. 



Success to Recreation and the work you 
are doing. I would never use an auto- 
matic shot gun, and if any firm which ex- 
pects the support and favor of sportsmen 
should put a gun of that stamp on the 
market in this enlightened age, it will be a 
shame and disgrace to all intelligent Amer- 
icans. What will our grandchildren say 
of us when they hunt through birdless 
covers and find deserted woods and waters? 
They will curse the day we allowed the 
manufacture and sale of such unsportsman- 
like guns. 

Leslie R. Fairn, Wolfville, N. S. 



C. E. Baird tells in June Recreation of 
his 6 pound, 11 ounce gun having too much 
recoil. Any gun of that weight would 
have more recoil than the 7 pound, 9 ounce 
gun he shot before; but provided his stock 
fits him, especially in lengtli and drop at 
cone, the gun should not punish him unless 
overloaded. I am using a 6% pound, 26 
inch, 16 guage Ithaca, $60 list, and with 
2^2 drams of Dupont smokeless and 7-8 
ounce shot, it is pleasant to sh®ot and the 
hardest hitting little gun I ever saw. 

John Nelson, Varna, N. Y. 



I saw in December Recreation a query 
about Harrington & Richardson revolvers. 
I am not authority on small fire arms, but 
I have a double-action, 22 caliber H. & R., 
5 inch barrel revolver, and I can vouch for 
its good service and accuracy. I have never 
made what would be counted a bad score 
at a target, and it has never failed in its 
action. I use 22 shorts, and they give 
me best satisfaction. My gun will pene 
trate 2% inch pine boards and is accurate 
up to 25 feet. 

S. W. Gould, Jersey City, N. J. 



From an experience of 30 years as a 
hunter I advise those who want big game 
to use the heaviest gun obtainable, espe- 
cially for moose. If a big bullet is thrown, 
by plenty of powder there is no need to 
inquire whether it mushroomed or not. 
No gun on the market has the penetration 
its makers claim. I know by actual test 
that there is not a difference of half an inch 
in the penetration, in dry spruce, .of the 
.303 Savage and the 38-55 and 40-72 Win- 
chesters. 

P.' H. Welsh, Chipman, N. B., Can. 



In May Recreation G. E. Cecil asks 
what kind of gun to buy for squirrel shoot- 
ing. I advise him to get a 12 guage, 



7 to SV2 pounds. If possible choose a 
hammerless ejector, 30 inch barrels, left 
full choke, right modified. I have always 
shot a Davenport and can vouch for it. It 
is not so handsome as some guns, but I 
have never seen a better. The Parker is 
generally considered the best American 
gun. 

M. G., North Abington, Mass. 



W. M. S. of Deposit, N. Y., says the 
Baker gun has the only positive safety. His 
experience is either limited or he is look- 
ing for a Christmas present. Since reading 
his article I have tried in every way I 
could think of to discharge a Syracuse 
and an Ithaca with the safety on, but with- 
out success. 

Lou N. Van Dreyer, Grand Haven, Mich. 



I greatly admire the stand you take 
against the use of automatic guns. Two 
chances at a bird are enough for anyone but 
a hog. Some men prefer a single barreled 
gun, and I -see no reason why they should 
not be permitted to use pump guns pro- 
vided they load but one shell in the maga- 
zine. 

H. J. Henry, Bradford, Pa. 



Your action in condemning the automatic 
shot gun is highly commendable and no 
one but a game hog would use one. A few 
dealers in our town handle them but so 
far none have been sold. Sentiment is 
against them and it is only a matter of time 
until they will be barred by law. 

C. Holdfer, Perry, la. 



I own a 12 gauge Francotte, and think 
it the best gun I ever fired. I should 
like to hear from other readers of Recrea- 
tion regarding this make of guns. The 
automatic shot gun, the game hog's friend, 
has made its appearance here. Game is 
scarce but game hogs are plentiful. 

Sam Lowther, Louisville, Ky. 



Will some one tell his experience with 
the 50-110 Winchester? How does it com- 
pare with the 30-30? What is its effect on 
large game? I have a .303 Savage and 
think there is no better gun made. Is the 
33 Winchester center fire a good gun? 

Kid, Eaton, O. 



I want to get in line with W. M. S., 
Deposit, N. Y., as regards the Baker gun. 
I have owned a Baker 15 years and it has 
always given perfect satisfaction. 

A. Weenstra, Paterson, N. J. 



I am with you in the fight against pumo 
and automatic guns. In the hands of game 
hogs the pump gun has nearly exterminated 
the game of York county. 

A. J. Fisher, York, Pa. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. If nhotographed, it may still live 
and its educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



GORDON WRIGHTER'S SNAKE STORY. 

I read Mr. Gordon Wrighter's'- article 
about the snake and the pickerel. I have 
seen thousands of water snakes swimming 
but never saw one hold his head above the 
water while swimming. Ordinarily, if not 
invariably, it is difficult, even with good 
eyes, to see the head of a swimming water 
snake at a distance of 30 feet. When 
swimming they carry their heads perhaps 
54 or 1 inch above the surtace. They do 
not always swim with the body exposed on 
the surface. Frequently they swim many 
yards completely submerged. According to 
my observations, the only time a water 
snake lifts his head above the water is when 
standing still by the side of some old, partly 
submerged log, or behind some rock or 
other shelter in the water. Then he will 
stealthily lift his head high enough above 
water to make observations. 

It is rare, too, to see a 4 foot water 
snake. This, coupled with the carrying of 
its head one foot above the water when 
swimming, would indicate with certainty 
that Mr. Wrighter's snake was not a water 
snake. Undoubtedly it was of the black 
snake family, which carries its head high, 
usually a foot or more when swimming, and 
is a rapid, graceful swimmer. Undoubtedly 
also it„was the rarity of this species of 
snake to the pickerel that led the fish to 
make the attack, the fish imagining the 
snake to be food, fit for his use. The vora- 
ciousness of pickerel is proverbial. In their 
choice of food they show unmistakable de- 
pravity and cannibalistic tendencies. The 
victims of pickered are often nearly a? 
large as the pickerel. 

I can believe that a 4 or 5 pound pickerel 
would cut a 4 foot snake in 2, and do it 
quickly. All old pickerel fishermen know 
of the keen, pointed teeth in the jaw of the 
pickerel. On several occasions I have had 
my fingers cut to the bone by them when 
taking a hook loose. I have seen green- 
horns when removing the hook from a pick- 
erel, have their fingers lacerated until it 
was dangerous. The teeth of a fish that 
will cut human flesh, will cut the flesh of 
a snake ; also, a strong line. I have fre- 
quently had lines that I could not break 
with my hands cut by pic^ pr eL This is the 
experience of many others. The teeth of 
a pickerel are not situated like those of 
man, or some of the animals ; the rabbit, 
for instance, which has teeth adapted to 
cutting off twigs, as smooth as if cut with 
a knife. The teeth of the pickerel stand 
out from his jaws irregularly, and as Mr. 



178 



Shields said, no 2 correspond, or fit against 
the other ; but they stand up like so many 
sword points, and are admirably arranged 
to chafe, grate, file away, as it were, the 
strongest fish line. 'We must bear in mind, 
when we hook a pickerel, that his positions 
from that time, are numerous, and that the 
line is passed many times over his numer- 
ous needlelike teeth while under great ten- 
sion. The tension of the line adds to the 
cutting capacity, or ease with which the 
pickerel's teeth cut. the* strongest line. If 
anyone will boldly insert his ringers in the 
mouth of a live, fighting pickerel he will 
be a convert to all of the foregoing, and un- 
til he does that he undoubtedly will fail to 
comprehend Mr. Wrighter's article. Fur- 
thermore, it is well known that to avoid 
the numerous cuttings of the line by the 
pickerel's teeth man}' anglers use protec- 
tive apparatus on the line, at the hook end, 
such as wire or gimp. On the use of this 
wire or gimp their trouble ceases. A few- 
years ago, on Lake Poponoming, Monroe 
county, Pennsylvania, 2 prominent Philadel- 
phia gentlemen were fishing, when a large 
rattlesnake swam out in the lake, presum- 
ably to cross it. Their attention was first 
called to the snake's performance by the 
splashing made by a 5 l / 2 pound pickerel 
which attacked the rattler. The 2 men 
rowed up close to the combatants and from 
their boat viewed the conflict. Eventually 
the pickerel killed the rattler, and after the 
snake was apparently dead, the pickerel con- 
tinued tugging at the snake's carcass. 
Gradually it became apparent to the 2 men 
that the pickerel was growing weaker. Af- 
ter a few minutes more he arose to the sur- 
face and lay there quivering as if in a 
spasm. Then he was dipped into the boat, 
and the dead rattler also was dipped in. 
The rattlesnake's skin was badly cut and 
torn, and his body had received wounds 
severe enough from the pickerel's teeth to 
kill him. 

Both the pickerel and the rattler were 
placed in a Philadelphia taxidermist's care, 
and he mounted both specimens, which I 
think are either in one of the gentlemen's 
hands yet, or else have been given to a mu- 
seum. 

M. L. Michael, North Watergap, Pa. 

In looking over the March issue of Rec- 
reation I noticed the Munchausen yarn to 
which Mr. Gordon Wrighter, of Kingston, 
N. Y., signed his name. His wet bait must 
have been fearful stuff ! I fished a few 
days at Picatinny lake, Government Pow- 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



179 



der Depot, near Dover, N. J., last fall, and 
one afternoon, to amuse one of the young- 
sters, I fished below the dam with a light 
fly rod for sunfish, using one of the small- 
est fly hooks. The last sunfish I caught I 
left on the hook. The fish was fairly well 
hooked through the upper lip. and was 
about 4^2 inches long. The boy had gone 
up the bank and with a minnow had hooked 
a small pickerel. When I went up to see 
the fish he had caught I carried with me 
my rod and line, with the sunfish still alive 
on the hook. While watching the boy fish 
I dropped the sunfish into the water and 
let him swim away with the line until about 
25 yards were off the reel. I then had a 
strike that made me think I had a whale 
on the hook. I worked the fish slowly and 
got him where I could see what it was. It 
proved to be a pickerel that would have 
weighed about 3V2 pounds. He had the 
sunfish crosswise in his mouth and tugged 
hard to get his bait loose. When I tried to 
work the pickerel into shallow water at the 
side of the boat landing he let go and swam 
away. I let the sunfish swim away again, 
and 4 or 5 times the pickerel struck him. 
holding on hard. Finally he gave up and 
left in disgust because he could not get the 
fish off the hook. When I examined the 
sunfish I found that the scales had been 
scraped off by the pickerel's teeth. 

My point of difference with Mr. Wrighter 
is that a fish that could bite a 4 foot snake 
in half should certainly have strength 
enough in his jaws to tear the slight hold 
of a small fly hook such as I had on the 
sunfish. I should like to hear through Rec- 
reation where Mr. Wrighter witnessed 
that wonderful sight. I have seen lots of 
snakes in the water but never yet have I 
seen a 4 foot snake swim with *4 oi his 
length out of the water. My opinion is 
that Mr. Wrighter and his brother both 
had snakes before they went fishing. 

Geo. R. Mansley, Newark, N. J. 



WANTOX CRUELTY. 

I am much interested in your magazine 
as it pleads the care of the helpless and 
persecuted. I am also desirous of seeing 
our gentle neighbors protected from the 
violence and greed of cruel, thoughtless, 
selfish men. 

The town where I live has a stream run- 
ning through it, dividing it into 2 parts, 
and on either side are flats, subject to over- 
flow in spring, autumn and winter. These 
flats are not built on, and in some parts 
large trees overhang the stream, spreading 
into a grove or park. In this seclusion 
wild birds and animals are sometimes seen, 
and often killed. 

One summer day an old lady came into 
my house saying, 

"Get your sun-hat quick ! and come with 



me. Mr. Dumanois has taken his gun and 
gone down to the water to kill our king- 
fisher." 

I went after the man with the gun, but 
we were too late. As we got near 'him, 
the report of the gun rang out and the 
lovely bird fell dead, all his bright plum- 
age stained with his blood. My friend be- 
gan to upbraid the gunner. I said nothing, 
but I looked first at the beautiful bird, then 
at the killer. I presume my eyes said a 
good deal, for he began to explain, 

"I shot it for my ferret.'' 
^ The ferret was to have something to eat! 
There are 4 or 5 meat markets in town, 
one not half a mile from that man's house, 
and a bit of fresh meat was as good for 
his ferret as the bird was. I did not an- 
swer him. He took up the bird, cut off the 
wings, and gave them to me, saying, 

"You can wear them in your hat;" but 
those wings were never worn in a hat. 

I remember the joy I had as a child in 
seeing a kingfisher haunting a shady stream 
where I played. I pinned the wings on the 
wall of my snuggery and often looked at 
them in sorrow for the owner's fate. 

I went to see the man's terret, and as 
the cruel little beast snuffed and gloated 
over the dead bird, I looked from it to its 
owner. There seemed to me a resemblance 
between the 2 — something bloodthirsty and 
vile. I think the man was grlaa to take the 
life of that rare bird. It was the only one 
ever seen here. I think he felt a joy 
in slaying. I did not speak. I let my 
friend do all the talking, but the man was 
even more uneasy under my silent reproach. 
Nothing could undo the deed, and bring 
life to the slaughtered bird. 

Last winter was hard for the birds. 
After January tnere was little bird life 
to be seen. The stores ot suet and seed 
were almost unvisited, and only a blue jay 
now and then was in sight. I think the 
birds went farther South. I can not see 
how they got any food otherwise, as storm 
after storm covered all the food provided 
for them, and the cold was most bitter. 
Even the English sparrows stayed away, 
and I felt lonely without my bird friends 
and neighbors. I trust they all went South 
and did not perish in the storm-ridden 
woods and fields. 

Two weeks ago there were many robins 
here. Mrs. H. P. Pyer, Lapeer, Mich. 



FEEDS THE ROBINS. 
I am a constant reader of Recreation, 
and take great pleasure in noting the num- 
ber of people who express themselves 
in sympathy with your views. I see in 
your Natural History department something 
not to my taste, where Mr. J. A. Krunkel 
says "kill the robins and sparrows." That 
is the most absurd thing I ever heard of. 
A person who would kill a robin here in 



i8o 



RECREATION. 



Michigan would be looked on as a loafer 
and a pot hunter and not only that but 
would be arrested and fined. A man who 
can not see something good in a robin is 
not a lover of nature. 

I am aware the robin is somewhat de- 
structive to small fruit ; but when I set 
out a cherry tree I always set out; 2 if pos- 
sible, one for myself and one for the boys 
and the robins and I am willing they should 
have a share of the fruit. A few years ago 
I set out a small park and in it put some 
sweet cherries, mulberries, etc., for the 
express purpose of _ coaxing the robins 
around. Woe to the person I catch throw- 
ing a stone or disturbing a nest of any of 
the birds which fill the trees. During the 
spring and summer I take great pleasure in 
watching the birds feed on the various 
fruits, although my wife sometimes scolds 
and says we do not get our share. If Mr. 
Krunkel had been raised near the woods, 
as I have been, he would love nature to 
such an extent that he would not advise 
killing the robins. It is wrong. As to the 
boys, I have never lost any fruit at night. 
I do not believe anyone could induce a boy 
who is acquainted with me to disturb my 
fruit at night, for they all know they are 
welcome to a share as long as it lasts and 
they help themselves in daylight without 
fear of being driven away. Where is the 
man who "has not, when a boy, slipped 
through an opening in the fence or under 
the bottom rail to get a choice bunch of 
grapes or a big red apple from a farmer's 
yard? The robin has her young to feed 
and is tempted bv the ripe fruit and knows 
not but it is free plunder. Save the robin 
and see to it that the boy gets plenty of 
fruit and no one will be injured. I do not 
wish to find fault with Mr. Krunkel's arti- 
cle, but I believe he is mistaken. 

G. S. Y., Alma, Mich. 



THE EUROPEAN CUCKOO. 

This bird (Caculus canorus) is found 
from Eastern Japan to Western Ireland. 
His name is a household word in all that 
vast extent of country and his coming 
looked forward to as the harbinger of 
spring. The Siberian convict who makes 
up his mind to hide from slavery in the 
vast forests of Central Siberia, says "he is 
under the orders of General Cuckoo," 
meaning that he runs away when the note 
of the cuckoo announces that spring has 
arrived. This bird, like all the cuckoos, is 
a destroyer of noxious insects, especially 
the hairy caterpillars °nd tent caterpillars 
that are such a pest to our fruit trees. 

I believe the New York Sun tried to im- 
port cuckoos to this country some years 
ago. I never heard whether the attempt 
succeeded. Probably the birds were lost 
off the Florida coast. If the cuckoo could 
be naturalized in Mexico first, he would 



spread Northward over the whole conti- 
nent. The only failing of the cuckoo is an 
aristocratic one. Madame Cuckoo, wish- 
ing to avoid the care of maternity, lays her 
eggs in another bird's nest. Our own cow- 
bird, or cow-blackbird has the same habit. 
It is a great mistake to suppose that the 
acclimatization of desirable foreign birds 
would cause our own birds to be neglected. 
The true lover of birds can find some good 
in all of them. The truth is the great mass 
of people take no interest in birds except 
to destroy them. Women who wear birds in 
their hats, are the greatest enemies of the 
birds. E. K. Carr, Knoxville, Tenn. 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 

Will you kindly tell me the name of a 
bird I recently saw? It was about the size 
of a sparrow. I found its nest. One of 
the birds had a yellow breast streaked with 
black, while the other had a yellow breast 
with no streaks, but one spot in the mid- 
dle. I could not tell anything more, as 
the 2 were exceedingly shy. The nest was 
4 feet from the ground, situated at the base 
of 2 branches of a small evergreen, in 
dense woods. At the time of discovery the 
nest contained 4 young. 

A Bird Student, Seal Harbor, Me. 

ANSWER. 

It is impossible to identify the bird with- 
out a fuller description.- — Editor. 



You have no doubt correspondents in 
British Columbia who could tell Recrea- 
tion what has been done, or is to be done 
for acclimatizing English song birds 
there. I think there is a great public in 
all parts of America who would welcome 
the coming of desirable song and game 
birds. Give both sides a hearing and Rec- 
reation can win as much fame as it has by 
its war on the game hog. 

E. K. C, Kerrville, Tex. 

Will British Columbia readers, who know 
of